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kachtz
04-20-2010, 07:17 PM
does anyone know the forumula for elevation into distance?
for disc golf.

for example..its been a long time since i looked but golf is something like 15 yards per 1000ft above sealevel carry...

so a 200 yard drive at sealevel would be a 215 yard drive 1000 ft above sealevel carry.

is there a conversion elevation formula out there? or a estimated

Apothecary
04-20-2010, 07:18 PM
i could tell you, but i charge a few bucks for a caddy fee.:\

Jukeshoe
04-20-2010, 07:25 PM
i could tell you, but i charge a few bucks for a caddy fee.:\

Mercenary. :|







;)

Apothecary
04-20-2010, 07:28 PM
Mercenary. :|







;)

i almost birdied a (somehwat) flatish 519' hole this morning. hit basket on a tough 35'er. im qualified. :|

Cgkdisc
04-20-2010, 07:57 PM
Not sure that's even been calculated. With the exception of slopes steeper than maybe 15%, the rule of thumb for effective distance on a hole is 30 feet for every 10 feet of vertical elevation change. So, a 300 ft hole with a 15 ft rise from tee to pin would effectively play like it was 345 on level ground.

Apothecary
04-20-2010, 08:18 PM
Not sure that's even been calculated. With the exception of slopes steeper than maybe 15%, the rule of thumb for effective distance on a hole is 30 feet for every 10 feet of vertical elevation change. So, a 300 ft hole with a 15 ft AVERAGE rise from tee to pin would effectively play like it was 345 on level ground.

Fixed.:p

The trick is to develop a good eye for it. the only way is two fold:

play a lot of courses where elevation is a significant factor.

throw a lot on flat land so you have a refined frame of reference.

solomon.trenton
04-20-2010, 08:22 PM
Not sure that's even been calculated. With the exception of slopes steeper than maybe 15%, the rule of thumb for effective distance on a hole is 30 feet for every 10 feet of vertical elevation change. So, a 300 ft hole with a 15 ft rise from tee to pin would effectively play like it was 345 on level ground.

im assuming that t he downhill would be opposite?

Cgkdisc
04-20-2010, 09:03 PM
Yes. Where it breaks down is really steep drop offs with slopes greater than 15% like a 150 ft hole with a 60 ft drop. That would work out to a -30 feet effective distance using the 3-to-1 ratio.

Matt
04-20-2010, 09:30 PM
To me it sounds like he isn't asking about throwing up and down hills but the distance a disc will fly at elevation as opposed to sea level. The answer is discs fly pretty much the same distance at 2000' as they do at sea level. Unlike ball golf, discs actually fly so the decreased air resistance at elevation is cancelled out by the lack of lift and glide.

Apothecary
04-20-2010, 09:45 PM
To me it sounds like he isn't asking about throwing up and down hills but the distance a disc will fly at elevation as opposed to sea level. The answer is discs fly pretty much the same distance at 2000' as they do at sea level. Unlike ball golf, discs actually fly so the decreased air resistance at elevation is cancelled out by the lack of lift and glide.

ok, noob.:\

where are you from? do play high-altitude courses regularly? if you did, youd realize that effective disc selection is WAY different at sea level than at high altitude.

optidiscic
04-20-2010, 10:08 PM
ok, noob.:\

where are you from? do play high-altitude courses regularly? if you did, youd realize that effective disc selection is WAY different at sea level than at high altitude.

Actually discs characteristics chain with changes in air density so disc choice is more important but I believe your both correct it's just that apothecary is more of a hater

leppard
04-20-2010, 11:31 PM
I've searched but it is hard to find any reliable info about this because there doesn't seem to be alot of people throwing at different elevations and accurately measuring their throws.

Apothecary
04-20-2010, 11:43 PM
nah...only thing to hate on in this thread is bad punctuation.








:p

optidiscic
04-20-2010, 11:56 PM
Haha I knew that was coming. Damn I phone predictive text got me. Truce

leppard
04-20-2010, 11:56 PM
Any noticeable change in distance at different elevations in your throws Apoth?

ChainMan
04-21-2010, 12:37 AM
ok, noob.:\

where are you from? do play high-altitude courses regularly? if you did, youd realize that effective disc selection is WAY different at sea level than at high altitude.

My home courses are above 6,000ft. I don't notice much difference in distance but discs fly more overstable here.

kachtz
04-21-2010, 10:55 AM
well i figured since disc golfs popularity is growing, but at the same time, not many people play in comparison to other sports, that no one would of created elevation calculator for it, but to think more about it, golf balls are all the same size, and each one of these discs are a different thickness, so the formula would be more complex.

im 100% sure there is a distance gain by gaining elevation but to how much, it would be hard to say, and i guess it doesnt really matter unless your a pro traveling around.

but in some cases it would be nice, especially if someone that is 6000ft above sealevel is throwing 500' !! to find out that is = to about 415' at sealevel...just a thought, for when people talk about distances.

and also, im trying to start using feet instead of yards in here, since that is how distances are talked in this game, takes a little getting used too.


:clap::clap:

Cgkdisc
04-21-2010, 11:05 AM
Gravity actually changes as you move around. There's a gravity map that shows how much more it is in certain mountainous areas. Because a specific disc will become more stable at higher altitudes, I think it would be difficult to do a "fair" experiment to even determine an altitude effect on distance. The player (or robot thrower) will have to adjust their throwing angle for identical wind and direction conditions to attempt to match the same flight path at sea level versus say 8000 feet for the same disc whatever it is.

leppard
04-21-2010, 12:21 PM
Someone needs to go to Death Valley(282' below sea level) and then up to Mount Whitney(14,505 feet.) Throw all your discs at both locations and report longest throws.

Dave242
04-21-2010, 04:39 PM
The density of the air does indeed change with altitude, but it also changes with temperature. Cold air is denser than hot air. So, cold air will act on the aerodynamics of a disc moreso than hot air. Have you ever noticed that your flippy discs are almost unusably flippy in the winter?

So, you also have to factor temperature into your altitude testing. :)

optidiscic
04-21-2010, 06:17 PM
I think the distance changes have way more to do with flight characteristics changing than any different gravity etc...the air is just less dense so theres less resistance but also less glife....your discs become more of a knife and more prone to flipping. I just play with a guy who had been out in Colorado for a few years...he kept commenting on how he had to get used to all this stability again.

leppard
04-21-2010, 09:32 PM
FWIW, everything I've read on this forum and others, very few say anything about extra distance at higher altitudes. Everyone talks about stability. Seems like even with the ideal disc, distance will be about the same.