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robbrews
04-30-2010, 12:15 AM
I need some advice on field practice. Ever since I implemented field paractice into my weekly routine my game has improved quite a bit. I am throwing much farther with better accuracy. But I have no strategy when I field practice. I just empty my bag and try to laser beam almost every one of them to practice keeping it down. Any advice would be much appreciated.

GLong
04-30-2010, 12:38 AM
1. Get multiples (same weight/plastic) of discs you like.
2. Throw similar discs (putters/mids/drivers) together.
3. Try to throw similar lines/types of shots with different discs.
4. If you don't throw both forehand and backhand, work on whichever one is weaker

leppard
04-30-2010, 12:45 AM
I try lots of different lines with all my discs and from different distances 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 feet, etc. One way I aim at my practice basket and the other way a tree. Try different grips and work on form. Easier to see what works and what doesn't on the practice field. One thing I need to add to my routine is forehand practice. Welcome to the forum.

Jax11
04-30-2010, 12:48 AM
My biggest problem with field practice was taking what I worked on in the field to the course. The distance translated, but the left to right aiming did not. I was throwing beautiful BH shots, straight about 50 feet or more to the right of the basket. Ever since then I try to pick out a tree and try to treat every throw just like I would treat my shot on the course.

shoe59
04-30-2010, 12:55 AM
Well I just checked your bag out -- looks like you could definitely use some new mids and putters to work with. Other than that looks like you have a nice selection of drivers.

I mean if you're a 2 Roc and 1 putter kinda guy I'm not gonna tell you what to carry, but if you pick a few more up you'll be walking back and forth less during field practice. Working with your mids and putters should really help your form and control. See how far you can get them consistently (hint: put some air under them), and then you'll know on the course "I can tee off with my aviar/roc on this hole". Doing this can also translate into more D from your drivers due to improved technique. Plus you'll be more confident with your upshots.

Some days you can get out there and practice your Max D like you already do, and others you can work on specific shot types e.g. hyzers/spike hyzers, anyhyzers, flex shots (s-shots). If you throw backhand maybe try and develop a forehand or even overhand.

robbrews
04-30-2010, 01:02 AM
Yes agree, as i am reading more on this forum it seems like I need slower discs because i am LHBH and I my max D is 350. I have a 171 San Marino glow Roc on the way and I think I want to get another Eagle. Maybe DX. Oh By the way is it wierd to throw your KC Roc as far as your Teebird consistently?

TalbotTrojan
04-30-2010, 01:26 AM
I have this wonderful little park across the street from my house and there should be a nine hole course at it but there isn't. There is a nice soccer field that I tend to throw across for field practice. Every throw is just like it would be if I were playing a course. I pick out the target and the line I want to take to get there. Then I throw. Everything is just the same, or as close as I can make it to throwing during an actual round. Typically I work backhand in one direction and forehand going back the other direction. I usually only take four or so discs with me, all of which are usually in a similar category of disc, Distance Driver, Fairway Driver, Mid Range or Putters. Seems to work well for me.

Lithicon
04-30-2010, 02:33 AM
Yes agree, as i am reading more on this forum it seems like I need slower discs because i am LHBH and I my max D is 350. I have a 171 San Marino glow Roc on the way and I think I want to get another Eagle. Maybe DX. Oh By the way is it wierd to throw your KC Roc as far as your Teebird consistently?

It is pretty normal, don't worry about that. If you're throwing them that far, just keep working on throwing them farther! Lol, that's pretty good though, you've got the basics down if you're throwing that far. Putters and Rocs are VERY good practice tools also.

As far as field practice goes, ALWAYS go to the field with an idea of what you want to work on. This is usually a little better to get maybe 1-2 things at a time. Don't overload yourself with practicing EVERYTHING in one session.

Distance, accuracy doesn't matter as much. Work on throwing as far as you possibly can. Once you get the distance, working on line shaping you'll translate accuracy to your distance from that.

Then when you want to work on Line shaping, get into like these guys are saying a course mentality. Find a target, pick the route you want to throw to get there. Practice hyzer, and anhyzer and different distances, and different degrees of turn. Meaning don't just do a HUGE looping Anhyzer. Try to throw different degree so it'll turn just a little on one practice session, then up it and throw it so it turns more. This doesn't have to be done with different disc, some disc can perform these all. Practice with what you have, see what they do when you throw them, LEARN what the disc does when you throw it a certain way.

Controlling these will be the key to learning what disc you'll need for certain shots. This will help you later when you're on the course, and give you a much bigger picture of how disc are flying, and give you a much better perspective on which disc fit what role in your bag.

PanicKJ
04-30-2010, 03:54 AM
I love throwing in the field. Don't get to do it much because of all the long hours I put in at the J-O-B.
However when I go I concentate on one mold. I may take 20 KC aviars out and throw them hyzer, throw them straight, throw them anny. Drive as far as I can with them, How far can I throw them without looking away from my target?

Next I may take My floppy Rhynos out, same routine, I can drive these discs pretty far.

Next time I may take some FLX buzzzes out. then teebirds,

I have a stack of 155 gummy gazellez that I absolutely love to throw in the field. You can throw them all friggin day and your arm never gets sore. I am amazed at how these discs hold up in the winds as well.

I broke out a bunch of Katanas one time and went to the field and I probably will not do that again. They go way too far and I get tired of chasing them down after each throw. This is why most of my driving practice involves putters. Improves form, the only thing that you need to remember when you get out on the course with a driver is to keep the nose down.

Donovan
04-30-2010, 04:23 AM
First off, I always believe that just throwing for distance sake alone, is going to create bad habbits. I personally believe if you are not throwing toward a particularly fine tuned object, you are creating bad habits. If you want to get faster or stronger, muscle wise, then go to the gym. Now, if you want to get faster and longer in disc golf, it is about your form and accuracy that will gain you the most distance and best progress that will last longer. Think Muscle Memory!

Secondly, pay attention to the environment. If it's windy, it isn't doing much for you to throw really understable discs into a headwind. So, if you are throwing back and forth, you may need to take the proper discs with you to the otherside by carrying them.

Third thing that comes to mind in this quick response is, know your discs. Learn to throw flat and smooth in no wind conditions so you know how each disc performs for you. Your buddy will almost never throw the exact same disc and get the exact same flight path that you do. You can look up the thousand threads and websites telling you how a disc was designed and what it is supposed to do, but that means nothing if you don't take the time to learn what the disc in your hand does for you. It's cool to know what a disc should do, but it is invaluable to know what it does for you.

Last thing is to make it fun. Find ways to make a game of your field practice. Score how many discs out of 10 throws you get within a certain number of steps of your target or something like that. Make up your own games. Throwing for throwing sake is going to make you lose interest or focus eventually. So, don't just throw all day long, throw with a purpose.

Enjoy this journey and love the practice. Peace brothers.

robbrews
04-30-2010, 07:18 AM
Thanks guys for all of the great advice.

toothyfish
04-30-2010, 08:12 AM
I practice in groups of discs, meaning i don't just empty out the bag, but have extras of my main molds for practice.

Ex: Rocs. I'll have 4 or 5, throw them easy for a warm up and then work on something specific, such as hyzers, annys, distance, etc, one type of shot at a time. I won't throw a Roc, then a Gazelle, then a putter, because I'm trying to get consistency.

One thing that I do, as much as possible, is to have a target for each throw. Could be anything (I have a small local course with a few baskets that criss-cross a field) throw at a tree, a gap, a soccer goal, something. This will force more discipline into your stance, run up, and throw, and help you judge accuracy and consistency.

I'll also use certain holes for practice, throwing 4 or 5 discs, if it has some type of shot that I'm trying to improve on. You can practice annys and hyzers into a soccer goal by standing along the goal line (like a corner kick) just further away.

If you can swing it, create a practice bag. I have one that has 5 Rocs, 3 Comets, 4 Gazelles, 4 true putters, 4 driving putters, 3 Predators (for nose angle/snap drills) I can just grab this and head out and have almost everything I need for basic skills improvement and "tune ups". These discs are all basically newish, so I get the same flight out of each disc.

Bubbajoe
04-30-2010, 08:20 AM
The only thing I would add to the posts above would be to practice on a football or soccer field if it's availble. Having an accuracte gauge for distance, I belive, is important. It will help you better guage your progress as well as establishing realistic limits for what you can do on the course.

garublador
04-30-2010, 08:45 AM
If you're working on technique, then you're doing pretty much the same thing I do.

If you want to work on skills, this is a great exercise:

http://www.discgolfreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=595

Jak3
04-30-2010, 12:54 PM
I like to go to soccer fields, ill throw back in forth. I can try to throw thru the netless soccer goal for accuracy (ill try to hit my bag behind the opposite goal) or ill just work on distance. Either way those soccer goals help ya keep track of your discs.

Ive been trying to hit up a field at least 3 times a week before i play a course that day.

Ive been doing this constantly for about 2 weeks now and ive notice about a 50-65 foot distance gain. (Recently quit driving RHFH due to injurys, prior i was maxing out 150 feet RHBH).

I also find it easier to work on form when ur out at a field, i can read my body better when im not focusing on a basket.

WillACarpenter
04-30-2010, 02:55 PM
I just bought a 300' tape measure and some 2" tall plastic "cones"

I first set up a tee, then I throw some warm ups, as does my dad. Then we mark our longest throw each.

Then we'll throw "for real" and see how far we can get out there under those specific conditions.

Depending on the day and skill we're working on I may measure out several hundred feet with a cone every hundred or fifty feet. Often I'll just put the cone at my longest throw, and a cone that is directly in front of the tee at that distance.

The idea with that is to get the same distance I've already thrown, but more controlled.

I also bring my basket out sometimes and use that with my field practice. Makes for a really fun time, especially the funny looks from locals walking their dogs!

\/\/

toothyfish
04-30-2010, 03:02 PM
If you're working on technique, then you're doing pretty much the same thing I do.

If you want to work on skills, this is a great exercise:

http://www.discgolfreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=595

GREAT DRILL!!! I've done something similar, but not with quite the variation in the discs. Gonna try it some time this weekend.

BTW, to make a disc act more overstable, it's a bit of wrist roll down, but is it a touch more nose up? By error, it seems that nose down can make some discs turn and dig in (putters, for example)

garublador
04-30-2010, 03:13 PM
BTW, to make a disc act more overstable, it's a bit of wrist roll down, but is it a touch more nose up? By error, it seems that nose down can make some discs turn and dig in (putters, for example)Either or both will work. It just depends on the shot.

Bubbajoe
04-30-2010, 05:00 PM
I like to go to soccer fields, ill throw back in forth. I can try to throw thru the netless soccer goal for accuracy (ill try to hit my bag behind the opposite goal) or ill just work on distance. Either way those soccer goals help ya keep track of your discs.

Ive been trying to hit up a field at least 3 times a week before i play a course that day.

Ive been doing this constantly for about 2 weeks now and ive notice about a 50-65 foot distance gain. (Recently quit driving RHFH due to injurys, prior i was maxing out 150 feet RHBH).

I also find it easier to work on form when ur out at a field, i can read my body better when im not focusing on a basket.
I totaly agree that throwing in the open helps to focus on mechanics. One additiinal thing i would add is to throw down the midfield line on a soccer field or down the side line of a football field. This will give you an accurate mesure for fade & glide as well as distance. Knowing what to realisticly excpect at the end of a disks flight will help keep you out of trouble in a round.

wolito
05-01-2010, 02:58 AM
Don't try to kill your shots each time you throw. You think you have such an open space that you can just let them rip and get distance that way. Focus on technique. Try something new like a grip and throw it 30 times or so and see what that does. Then focus on changing things until it clicks. Try to learn how to throw it correctly and not just for the sake of throwing the discs down the field.

Lithicon
05-01-2010, 03:47 AM
First off, I always believe that just throwing for distance sake alone, is going to create bad habbits. I personally believe if you are not throwing toward a particularly fine tuned object, you are creating bad habits. If you want to get faster or stronger, muscle wise, then go to the gym. Now, if you want to get faster and longer in disc golf, it is about your form and accuracy that will gain you the most distance and best progress that will last longer. Think Muscle Memory!

It only creates bad habits if you have no idea what you're doing. Throwing to increase distance is working on technique, has squat to do with throwing at a target. Because you're focusing on hitting the target then. YOU MUST FOCUS on technique to improve it. Otherwise you revert the thing you referred to called muscle memory. If you can't consciously alter your technique and manipulate your body to change the technique away from your muscle memory, you're going to stand in a field and throw exactly the same way for hours and do nothing, while blindly shooting at a target. That's completely ass backwards and is why people make no strives in their distance.

This is why when I wrote my first post I said ALWAYS GO IN THE FIELD WITH A SET GOAL, the majority of accuracy doesn't come from distance throwing. It comes from line shaping drills, which is THEN translated to your distance with repetition further gaining muscle memory.

When you go into the field to work on distance technique, you need to have a goal for yourself, not just to throw farther. That's the blind leading the deaf, as you're blindly shooting at a target you have no idea how to reach. If it's "keep the disc closer to my body" THAT SHOULD BE YOUR GOAL, not just throwing farther. "shorten my run up last step, make sure to get my weight forward." You have to have a goal even if it's that for 400 throws a day. It's not easy as walking in a field and, "I'm going to throw farther today."

Then when it's, "I want to work on accuracy." You get line shaping drills down. This is where you learn how your disc fly. I want to pick this target, I want to hit it with a slight hyzer angle about 5-8 degree, but have it land 300' or so out. THAT builds accuracy, and YES you must focus on your technique here as well. As altering hyzer angles is the key to reaching the target. Which ultimately translates to your distance game. Then you do the same thing for anhyzers, you pick a target, pick specified line. You throw 400 or so throws till it you're hitting that line do a degree you're comfortable with.

I'm not saying distance doesn't build accuracy, as it does also build accuracy. But, you don't need a target to do it. As your ability to exert control over a disc at say 400' makes your ability to control it on every thing under some % better the farther you go down. Get to 500', then your accuracy at 300' is almost double what it was when you were throwing 400' as your ability to control your body, and your disc have increased substantially. Then your control at 400' then has increased as well. But, ultimately distance has less affect then doing line shaping drills in a field to increase accuracy because you must manipulate your body to correctly throw the disc in a very controlled fashion to hit your intended line, once you get good at that at lower distances, you step up distances and go until you're throwing controlled lines up to your max distances. Throwing 400' annies that start and finish on an anhyzer plane is not easy.

I'm sure I missed something I meant to put in here. But, someone said you're throwing Rocs and Aviars. THOSE two disc you will be able to throw generally up to 400' with control, they are all you "need" when you're throwing 300-350' controlled lines. And, I generally use putters when working on distance technique drills. You said your Rocs were going the same nearly as your Teebirds which is good. So work on getting your Aviar up there with it. IT WILL do it, and don't let anyone say it won't. I'm throwing 350' controlled lines with my putters. Work on getting all three of those disc going WHERE you want them on controlled lines, and you're heading in the right direction.

Lithicon
05-01-2010, 04:24 AM
Ps, on the last part, it's going to take some practice for the Rocs and Aviars to really get those distances, especially on the course. It just takes getting them a slight bit higher overall than the Teebirds. But, those disc will reach those distances, that's what open field line shaping drills are for though. The Teebird, Rocs, and Aviars, are all good disc and should pretty much be taken to the field to practice shaping lines with all of them. Just remember start low, give yourself a realistic goal, 200' controlled lines, then work your way up in distances when you're hitting them comfortably will all your disc.

robbrews
05-01-2010, 06:45 AM
Ps, on the last part, it's going to take some practice for the Rocs and Aviars to really get those distances, especially on the course. It just takes getting them a slight bit higher overall than the Teebirds. But, those disc will reach those distances, that's what open field line shaping drills are for though. The Teebird, Rocs, and Aviars, are all good disc and should pretty much be taken to the field to practice shaping lines with all of them. Just remember start low, give yourself a realistic goal, 200' controlled lines, then work your way up in distances when you're hitting them comfortably will all your disc.
That sounds like sound advice. I am going to stock up on some more aviars and more rocs.

mcmyers640
05-01-2010, 08:02 PM
I'm not saying distance doesn't build accuracy, as it does also build accuracy. But, you don't need a target to do it. As your ability to exert control over a disc at say 400' makes your ability to control it on every thing under some % better the farther you go down. Get to 500', then your accuracy at 300' is almost double what it was when you were throwing 400' as your ability to control your body, and your disc have increased substantially. Then your control at 400' then has increased as well. But, ultimately distance has less affect then doing line shaping drills in a field to increase accuracy because you must manipulate your body to correctly throw the disc in a very controlled fashion to hit your intended line, once you get good at that at lower distances, you step up distances and go until you're throwing controlled lines up to your max distances. Throwing 400' annies that start and finish on an anhyzer plane is not easy.

I'm sure I missed something I meant to put in here. But, someone said you're throwing Rocs and Aviars. THOSE two disc you will be able to throw generally up to 400' with control, they are all you "need" when you're throwing 300-350' controlled lines. And, I generally use putters when working on distance technique drills. You said your Rocs were going the same nearly as your Teebirds which is good. So work on getting your Aviar up there with it. IT WILL do it, and don't let anyone say it won't. I'm throwing 350' controlled lines with my putters. Work on getting all three of those disc going WHERE you want them on controlled lines, and you're heading in the right direction.

Most specific field advice I've read in a while. Thanks!

mcmyers640
05-01-2010, 08:05 PM
Hey lithicon,

What aviar do you use? KC? P&A?

Lithicon
05-01-2010, 08:32 PM
I personally don't use Aviars. I use Darts as my main putting, approaching, driving. R-Pro for putting, and I use Star for approaching and driving. But, I can throw them all the same distances, and all on the same lines.

Eagle
05-01-2010, 09:28 PM
It helps if there are a couple of targets in the field to utilize. If not, most use their DG bag. Let's say you throw 300 ft. Pick a target 300 feet away, and throw one shot e.g. hyzer at the target with all your discs. Try to get all the discs within 30 feet of your target.

Repeat this throwing all anhyzers, then throwing all straight shots. The idea is to learn to throw every line with all of your discs. Learning to throw different shots, is all about learning the proper release.

When you can pick any disc out of your bag and throw any line with it, you'll learn how your discs fly, & you'll be able to commit to your shots with confidence.

You can also work on form, technique, accuracy & distance.

Daddy-O
05-02-2010, 01:02 AM
I like to hit a baseball field about once per month only to satisfy my curiosity about how far I'm really throwing and which discs go how far. Otherwise, I have a soccer field and a lacrosse field nearby and I often try to get into the goals from different locations. I like to move to spots that cause trees to be in my approach from changing positions.

If it's windy, I like to make sure to rotate around and throw from all 4 sides of the field.

Cory
06-24-2010, 03:36 PM
When you guys talk about getting your weight forward, what is "forward?" Is forward the direction the disc is going or is forward leaning your upper body so that your weight is more on your toes?

Just trying to get this straight in my head.

SpyderPride
06-24-2010, 04:04 PM
When you guys talk about getting your weight forward, what is "forward?" Is forward the direction the disc is going or is forward leaning your upper body so that your weight is more on your toes?

Just trying to get this straight in my head.
Your weight should never be anywhere other than the balls of your feet, so near the toes. "Weight forward" means getting all of your weight onto your plant foot, which is the right foot for a RHBH. You do this during your powerful body rotation and through to the follow-through.

Cory
06-24-2010, 04:36 PM
Ok that makes sense. Thanks.

So what's proper upper body positioning?

Still trying to get the nose down on my throws.

peppermack
06-24-2010, 04:42 PM
You want to make sure that your head is at least in line with your front foot as you get to the hit so that your momentum is all going forward and as you come on your follow through your arm stays on a straighter plane. If your weight is back at all it is sucking away a lot of that energy and you tend to get way more noise up. My head and right shoulder is in line withmy plant foot as I start to come toward my left pec so that everything is getting pulled around on and going forward as my hips start to open. if your weight is back your whole orientation will be more in a upward position making it really hard to keep noise down and looses you a lot of distance.

peppermack
06-24-2010, 04:47 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOMbSi_-3-k&feature=related

look at how Dan's body is positioned as he gets his plant foot down, very weight forward body orientation.

djjeremiahj
06-24-2010, 05:31 PM
For me field practice serves one of many different purposes... i practice each as according to my own need and personal improvement.

1) Testing Discs.
* Atleast once a week, i take my discs to a field and throw back and forth 1-2 times just to make sure they are still flying properly. A lot of people would be surprised at how their disc flies completely different than it used to or they expected it to (and thus killing their game in the process).

2) Gauging Distance
* This is very integral (imho) to consistent and competitive play. I know very clearly how far each disc goes, and how it travels in the process. This way i pick the disc that's appropriate (via range) for the shot.
When i do this, i try 2 methods.... The "same throw every time" and the "how far can i really rip this throw". The "Same throw every time" is what i try to really lock into as it's the most reliable accurate measure of what i can do. (But it is nice to watch your discs really sail when you let into them with max power.)
Example - I wont try to drive a 325' hole with my teebird when i know that distance is at the farthest range of that disc.

3) Remembering (or Unlearning) Proper Throwing Technique
* Sometimes, during the process of play, i pick up a bad habit, get lazy, or whatever. Just going to a field and throwing helps "unlearn" or "remember" how to throw properly.

4) Line Shaping / Understanding
* Sometimes i want to learn a particular throw, try to incorporate a specific technique or watch a disc in flight (if thrown properly) to understand its true line.

5) Disc Familiarity
* Do you really know exactly how YOUR disc flies if thrown correctly? Is your sidewinder still a bit new, and not turn over enough? Is your beast too broken in and flips.... Do you know how your discs will fly into the wind, against the wind, etc...
On almost every throw, i pick up a disc and try to remember (conciously) think of how i need to throw it (angle, power, etc) and how i need to throw it based on the conditions of that day (wind, etc).

Things i've learned from throwing in a field...
I have a *fairly* accurate measure of how far a disc will travel based on my own pace count.
A lot of times i throw without measuring just to watch the disc, and compare how each lands. (Destroyer always lands to the left of the wraith, but goes 10' farther, but the katana goes 10' farther than the wraith, etc...) i really watch the patterns. You'd be surprised to find that, in many cases, you have a lot of redundancy and overlap in your discs.

Cory
06-24-2010, 05:40 PM
He's just so fast. Crazy.

Watching those videos is a bit depressing.