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-   -   Snap vs. Hit (http://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81556)

Dan Ensor 02-02-2013 09:52 PM

Snap vs. Hit
 
Can someone clarify "snap" for me? Is a full hit automatically good snap, or can you hit it without snapping it?

digital 02-02-2013 10:45 PM

if you're in california, you can hit it without snapping it. but that's something different.

New013 02-02-2013 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digital (Post 1827187)
if you're in california, you can hit it without snapping it. but that's something different.

:clap:

rocthecourse 02-03-2013 12:07 AM

I would think that even a half hit would be good snap, but I could be wrong.

BogeyNoMore 02-03-2013 12:18 AM

While "snap" and "the hit" are terms commonly used in DG circles, I'm not so sure they have meanings that are clearly defined enough to be understood across the board by all. I genuinely think these terms mean different things to different people.

When I think of snap, I think of how much you "snap"the disc forward as you are about to, and through the release of the disc - which would impact a bit more speed (fwd velocity), while generating quite a bit more rotation (spin).

I'm a bit fuzzier on how to interpret the hit - but again I think it's a somewhat vague term.

Use the Google search feature for "the hit" as there are many threads on the subject.

morefadeplz 02-03-2013 12:53 AM

I'll take a stab...

The hit is describing an event in a good swing that is the culmination of many forces coming together in unison (i.e. feet, legs, weight shift, hips, torso, core, shoulders, upper arm, lower arm, wrist, pivot). In order to really throw far, consistently, and dependably you must be able to control the hit. By control the hit I mean be able to cause it in varying degrees from barely to full blown crush. It is called hit because, well, it is what it feels like. Imagining that you were going to strike someone in anger in a similar fashion as you throw a disc, it would be the point that you make contact with the recipient of said aggression.

Snap refers to a few things:
Snap 1: Snap is the amount of torque applied to the disc. Snap can refer directly to the numerically ascertainable (through observational science) number of rotations. It is the rotational force applied to the disc at the time of the "hit."

Snap 2: Snap can also refer to the ability of one to "hit." i.e. that guy has great snap. This doesn't necessarily mean that he spins the disc fast, but rather that he "hits" well.

Snap 3: The audible sound when a disc is released. There is a difference between "snap" and "slip" and even more dispute over whether hearing snap is good, bad, or neutral.

Snap 4: The physical act of snapping the disc. (Very similar to Snap 2) This refers more to the mechanics in themselves as opposed to the form as a whole. Primarily wrist pivot only, and more to do with controlling the Snap 1 type rotational force.

Long story short, snap can be equivalent to hit, snap can be produced by the hit, snap can be one aspect of the hit.

BogeyNoMore 02-03-2013 01:39 AM

^ good post.
Quote:

Originally Posted by morefadeplz (Post 1827398)
Snap 1: Snap is the amount oftorque applied to the disc. Snap can refer directly to the numerically ascertainable (through observational science) number of rotations. It is the rotational force applied to the disc at the time of the "hit."

Thank you! I was thinking exactly the same thing! Just prior to release, the disc actually rotates about an axis that is not the center of the disc; it's actually the point where you're holding it as the disc pivots fwd. Upon release, there's nothing remaining to "pivot" around, so it begins to rotate about its Center of Mass = spin.

While your use of the term torque seems accurate, I didn't want anyone confusing it with Off Axis Torque (completely different), so I avoided the word "torque" altogether.

And the fact that you have all that "snap" just illustrates now nebulous these terms are.

hiflyer 02-03-2013 06:06 AM

From what I've understood after reading many, many, threads on this site, and talking to people on the course. As well, discussing with my friends:

SNAP: A qualitate term to describe the number of rpms exerted upon the disc, around an axis perpendicular to the flight plate, resulting from the sudden rotation of ones hand about the wrist at the end of a throw.

HIT: A sequence of bio-mechanical actions involving the entire body, used to describe when and how a disc should be positioned through the latter half of a backhand golf throw (not including follow-through).


But I could be wrong

CBoyle 02-03-2013 06:10 AM

Hit = the point in which the disc is ripped from your hand. Simple as that. To have good hit you would have to control all the different variables.

Snap = When you apply spin to the disc after the Hit. Too have good snap would mean to make it have a lot of spin. Spin is what makes are discs fly. More spin = more lift and glide.

Dan Ensor 02-03-2013 04:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CBoyle (Post 1827539)
More spin = more lift and glide.

More air speed = more lift

More spin = more stability
Spin probably also has to do with momentum; I'm pretty sure it effectively makes the disc significantly heavier.


"Hitting" is the act of getting the disc into the power zone before it rips out. The further into the power zone, the better the hit (as I understand it).

So is 'snap' ... like ... how quickly you can move the disc through the power zone?


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