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-   -   Dye Tee-Pads (http://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=83337)

Jaredav 02-26-2013 11:52 AM

Dye Tee-Pads
 
What is the opinion on dying tee-pads a particular color?
we are in the process of constructing two disc golf courses at lake mcmurtry in Stillwater OK and we want our course to not only designed well but also be appealing. Any suggestions on colors? Is dying the tee-pads even worth it?
we have two tee pads per hole and we are thinking of dying them different colors in order to distinguish them.

thanks

blazerico 02-26-2013 12:07 PM

I think its a great idea. Based on what I know about concrete(little) it shouldn't be very hard at all. One of the colors should be white, that way you don't have to add anything. :)

Bultx1215 02-26-2013 02:39 PM

Dye on rough concrete will wear down and fade depending on traffic. They use sealers to prevent that in most concrete, but a sealer would make a tee pad slick..no good. As long as you don't mind some maintenance every year or two, I think its a cool idea. Skill level needed is low as the acid is done after it is dry and cured.

There is an other idea you could use...integral color. The color is added to the concrete just before you pour it and the color is all the way through the mix. No fading or wearing off that way. Only drawback is price and color choice is limited. You would have to pour one color at a time this way.

The other way to color is a dry shake color that is applied to regular concrete after the first floating. It gets applied and worked in two or three times, giving you a color depth of about 1/4" if you do it right. It can be pricey as well, but will afford better color choice. Skill level needed on this process is high. Timing is critical on application an working the color in.

Stemplejg 02-26-2013 03:12 PM

If I were going to dye tee pads, I would do them in the color that tee is. What I mean by that is on some courses you have white, red and blue tees. If you could dye all the white tees white, and all the red tees red, it would help limit confusion on which tee is what. Also if you could figure how to incorporate the tee number that is associated with that tee either into the concrete (without creating an uneven surface) or into the dye some how, that would be amazing looking!

Of course you could just go crazy with the dyes, and make them extreme looking!

wilsondl 02-26-2013 03:23 PM

I think its a killer idea especially in areas with those pesky things called winters...Are there any current courses that utilize dyed tee pads.

wilsondl 02-26-2013 03:26 PM

I have seen black pads (asphault before) however that is not a very practicle application in extremly hot or extremly cold climates...Lets see some pics people

sloppydisc 02-26-2013 03:34 PM

Agreed
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Stemplejg (Post 1869800)
If I were going to dye tee pads, I would do them in the color that tee is. What I mean by that is on some courses you have white, red and blue tees. If you could dye all the white tees white, and all the red tees red, it would help limit confusion on which tee is what. Also if you could figure how to incorporate the tee number that is associated with that tee either into the concrete (without creating an uneven surface) or into the dye some how, that would be amazing looking!

Of course you could just go crazy with the dyes, and make them extreme looking!

It sounds like a great idea if executed well. Good luck. Send pics when done.

Bultx1215 02-26-2013 04:32 PM

Color chart for ya....http://www.scofield.com/dye_colorchart.html

KGroff25 02-26-2013 04:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bultx1215 (Post 1869735)
There is an other idea you could use...integral color. The color is added to the concrete just before you pour it and the color is all the way through the mix. No fading or wearing off that way. Only drawback is price and color choice is limited. You would have to pour one color at a time this way.

We used this method in some precast tee pads that are now installed at Keizer Rapids Park. We used a brown dye per request of the parks department so the pads would look less invasive. The professionals at the precast place did all the mixing for us so that wasn't a problem, but it looked fairly easy to do as long as you used the proper amount of dye.

Frankly, when the pads dried up they didn't look that different than the couple of pads that didn't get dyed. Furthermore, when they were installed and not next to each-other for comparison, nobody would ever realize that some of the pads were dyed and some weren't. The change in color/shade just wasn't that significant.

Honestly, I would probably recommend either saving the money and not dying the pads or make sure that you chose a color that will significantly stand out.

mashnut 02-26-2013 05:20 PM

Whatever you do, make sure it isn't causing a slick surface on top of the pads. A course in the Chicago area has tee pads with some kind of green coloring, but when there's even a tiny bit of moisture they turn extremely slippery. Another option is to just paint the front corners, it'll be less expensive and still obviously shows which pad is which. Here are a couple pictures from James Dillon Park in IN with red and blue tees:

http://www.dgcoursereview.com/course...e8f4a2ce_m.jpg

http://www.dgcoursereview.com/course...019d424c_m.jpg


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