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-   -   Sidearm Lever (http://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=90135)

JayChum 06-10-2013 02:07 PM

Sidearm Lever
 
I've been playing for a couple months. Used to play baseball so I decided to concentrate on the sidearm throw. I have only been successful throwing this style on one occasion. I have no clue what I was doing right that day. My problem is understanding the shoulder, elbow, and wrist creating the lever. All kinds of info on grips, but I can't find an explanation on the lever. Any advice would be appreciated. I don't have much more hair to pull out.

KatanaFrenzy 06-10-2013 02:12 PM

Sarah Hokom explains it very well in this video!

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She comes up at around 16 minutes.

joegraham 06-10-2013 02:18 PM

You may be trying to put too much arm into the throw and not enough wrist. Try practicing throwing with as minimal back swing as possible and use your wrist, then increase back swing to go where you're comfortable. You want a bent elbow and keep that elbow close to your body so your forearm and wrist does the work. Snapping the wrist is where you get both spin and speed. Step into the throw, not run. Follow through like you would throwing a ball. The main "lever" in this throw is the forearm. The secondary "lever" is the hand because it doesn't move too much relative to the forearm. The fulcrum is the elbow although it moves throught the throw. The secondary fulcrum is the wrist because it doesn't move too much relative to the elbow.

Think about "pushing" the disc rather than throwing like a ball. With a ball your shoulder is a fulcrum too. Not too much in forehand disc throw. Try to keep the plane of the disc on line to your release point as long as possible for cleaner faster releases. This is a common problem. Again practice slowly with the disc flat and "push" it, then increasing backswing (reach) and "push" it faster.

Jax11 06-10-2013 03:09 PM

With my sidearm mechanics my shoulder initiates the movement, but my elbow leads into the throw. My fore arm and wrist then follow.

Also try to throw slow. A lot of beginning side-arm players have too much arm speed relevant to the amount of spin they can get on the disc. Your distance will suffer at first, but getting clean releases throwing slow will help you build up clean distance in the long run.

NOStheBOSS 06-10-2013 03:21 PM

Palm to the sky. A lot of people have trouble with forehand because they roll their wrist (including me)

JayChum 06-10-2013 03:29 PM

I've kept my palm up and side of my arm towards throw. It's creating the fulcrum that has me frustrated. I'm just whipping my arm around. (the wrong way) Like I said, for an hour and a half I had the throw right. Really Right in fact. Low flat straight throws. That was a couple weeks ago. Hasn't happened since. I go play at least several times a week, and I'm better than I was when I started, but I feel like I'm getting better at bad form. The disc isn't rolling off my fingers at all.

Jax11 06-10-2013 03:34 PM

What discs are you throwing?

McBurdy 06-10-2013 03:45 PM

if you are using a two finger grip(fore finger and middle finger) your middle finger beside the fingernail should be the fulcrum. try putting the pad of your middle finger in the corner between the rim and flight plate.

jimcramer24 06-10-2013 03:47 PM

I found this video to be really helpful when learning forehand:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7ewCoZ8BwM

Tiny 06-10-2013 03:49 PM

Maybe learn how to use your offhand for backhand. So it imitates your baseball swing?


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