#1  
Old 10-12-2011, 09:02 PM
duckychucky's Avatar
duckychucky duckychucky is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Years Playing: 12.6
Courses Played: 19
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 183
adding 2nd fairways

I'm super excited to add a 2nd fairway to most of the holes on my course this weekend!
The newly designed course will have red and blue tees from the existing wider fairways
and white and gold from the new, more narrow fairway.
Since we can't add the back nine baskets to the course til spring,
this redesign is going to make our 9 feel like 18 (or 36).
Thoughts, suggestions...
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-12-2011, 09:06 PM
Aim For The Chains's Avatar
Aim For The Chains Aim For The Chains is offline
FROLF OFF!
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: MINNESOTA
Years Playing: 6.5
Courses Played: 104
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 7,558
what course? post pics of current design.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-12-2011, 09:22 PM
duckychucky's Avatar
duckychucky duckychucky is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Years Playing: 12.6
Courses Played: 19
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 183
Ausable Chasm in New York. Only one pic on this site and all my maps and pics are on my work computer.
I guess my one question is should the old wider fairway always be red and blue and the new narrow one be white and gold on every hole?
Or should I mix it up so that the narrow fairway is sometimes blue and red so you go from tight to open shots every other hole?
I like the idea of the gold fairway playing like a heavily wooded back nine with a different character but not sure I want to play nine claustrophobic(sp?) holes in a row
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-12-2011, 09:43 PM
Aim For The Chains's Avatar
Aim For The Chains Aim For The Chains is offline
FROLF OFF!
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: MINNESOTA
Years Playing: 6.5
Courses Played: 104
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 7,558
Well... there are some courses which are just historically known as tight as wooded and TOUGH. Generally any tight wooded hole is cause for some kind of odd kicks off trees and horrible lies making them much more difficult but also keep in mine "gold" level players should be able to navigate those lines. I would not change the orginal layout if it has a good flow and is accepted as a good course-- not looking at the reviews or anything when writing this so that would be a good place to start and see what issues people have with any holes etc. The back 9 could get a little tough for less experienced players but also provide a different feel like you said. If a hole is narrow and only one tight line accessable it generally would be a white/gold shot assuming it is over 150-220 feet- if short then a few for a red/blue style player is fine and a good change of pace.

check out the pdga pdfs:

http://www.pdga.com/files/documents/ParGuidelines.pdf

http://www.pdga.com/files/documents/...Guides2009.pdf

3. LENGTH: Most courses should have at least one configuration for beginners and casual
recreational players that rarely averages more than 250 feet per hole (75 meters). This works out to a
maximum of 4500 ft (1350m) for an 18-hole course or 2250 feet (675m) for a 9-holer. The preferred
length range is 3600-4300 feet (1080-1290m) for the shortest setup on a typical 18-hole public course.
This is an average length of 200-240 feet per hole (60-73m). No hole should be shorter than 120 feet
(35m) even on courses for beginners, but 150 feet (45m) is the "normal" low end limit.
Longer configurations are achieved by installing alternate tees and/or target positions on several holes.
Typical 18-hole course setups for amateur White level players range from 4500-6000 feet (1350-
1800m). Course setups longer than 6000 feet (1800m) are primarily for better players at the Blue or
Gold level, and for tournament play. There is no maximum length allowed for a hole. The longest
holes in the world can get to 1500 feet (458m). See document: Course Design Guidelines for PDGA
Skill Levels & Divisions


4. HOLE NOTES: There should be at least one flight path that can be negotiated at the skill level the
route is designed for. There should be more than one flight path or type of throw (including rollers)
available on several of the holes. There should not be too many objects within 33 ft (10m) of each
target. An object near the target should never be so large that a player cannot find an unobstructed
flight path by stretching sideways, throwing from a low stance, throwing through or over the top of the
object.
No player throwing from the shortest (or only) tee on a hole should ever be "forced" to throw over
water that is normally greater than 18" deep (50cm). Design an alternate flight path (usually to the left)
that gives player the option to not cross water. Any normally dry trenches or bodies of water under 18"
deep that are regularly in play should have safe paths down and out to be able to throw and/or retrieve
discs safely.

5. TEES: Hard surface tee pads of textured cement or asphalt are preferred. Preferred size is 5 ft wide
by at least 12 ft long (1.8x3m). Maximum size is 6 ft wide by 18 ft long with the back end flaring out
to 10 feet wide. If you need to conserve materials, make tee pads shorter on short or downhill holes
and longer on long holes. For example, a hard surfaced tee pad at the top of a hill on a short hole might
only need to be 8 ft long because most players will just stand at the front edge of the tee to make their
throws.
Non-hard surface tee areas should be even surfaced and not contain protruding rocks or roots. Tee
areas should be level from left to right. They should not slope too sharply from front to back. Without
hard surfaced or rubber tee pad, the front edge of tee area must be indicated by the front edge of a tee
board buried flush in the ground or by the imaginary line between two stakes or flags that mark the
front edge.Beyond the front of each tee pad and either side should be adequate room for follow-thru so a player
doesn't risk twisting an ankle, falling off a ledge or whacking their arm on a tree or sign. If possible,
provide adequate level ground for a run-up behind each tee pad, especially on longer holes. Avoid
major obstructions that severely block the flight path up to 20 feet in front of tee.
On courses with alternate tees on some holes, the tee areas in the shorter positions should always be
better or at least equal in quality to those in longer positions. For example, avoid designs where the
long tee pads are cement and short tee pads are grass or dirt, especially when there are no tee signs.
The designated color for each set of tees used for course layout identification on scorecards should
match one of the four recognized player skill levels that set of tees was designed for: Gold, Blue,
White or Red. Sometimes there’s no room for two tees on every hole. Just make sure to mark each tee
on single tee holes with both colors.
Course managers are encouraged to move toward these color guidelines when the opportunity presents
itself for new installations, redesigns or course upgrades when their current color(s) do not match the
PDGA guidelines
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-12-2011, 10:24 PM
duckychucky's Avatar
duckychucky duckychucky is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Years Playing: 12.6
Courses Played: 19
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 183
Thanks for all the info, however i have read all that stuff before
and know what the lengths should be.
The biggest complaint we have now is that its only 9 holes,
so I foresee most people playing 2 rounds either red/white,
white/blue or blue/gold (maybe gold/red for those looking for cubby aces),
So most everyone will play from both fairways after playing 18
I just can't decide if all the extra wooded holes should be in the same round...
Reply With Quote
 

  #6  
Old 10-13-2011, 05:31 PM
denny ritner's Avatar
denny ritner denny ritner is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: deep in the heart . .
Years Playing: 16.6
Courses Played: 161
Posts: 666
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aim For The Chains View Post
3. LENGTH: Most courses should have at least one configuration for beginners and casual
recreational players that rarely averages more than 250 feet per hole (75 meters). This works out to a
maximum of 4500 ft (1350m) for an 18-hole course or 2250 feet (675m) for a 9-holer.
I agree that courses should have multiple sets of tees that include a beginner set. I also think that if there's only enough money in the budget to pour one set of cement tees, then the beginner set should get poured first and the longer tees can remain natural until additional funding becomes available.

I do not agree, however, with the idea that holes shouldn't average more than 250 feet for beginners. Shots shouldn't average more than 250 feet for beginners, but not holes. i.e. Par 4's can be 350-500 and par 5's can be 500-650ish for the red tees.

My course plays to 5,500 ft. and par 62 for the red tees. This works out to an average shot of 212 ft. (5,500/(62-36)) Even par on the reds is about an 870 rated round.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.