#31  
Old 03-12-2012, 02:41 PM
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harr0140 harr0140 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
I think that's what I said. I recommend chemicals UNLIKE Roundup so the grass is undamaged.

Actually, in my limited experience Roundup isn't great on woody plants. Versions of 2,4 D do a better job. At Stoney Hill we use both, where necessary. Along with tons and tons of mowing and weedeating lopping and even some overseeding with grass to choke out the rest.
Ahh I misread that statement . . .sorry about that. And I recommended de-pantsing yourself in my own post (when I clearly meant plants not pants) . . . I should slow down or get a new keyboard that can keep up with my typing, and a brain that can kee up with my reading.



Agreed roundup on woody plants doesnt do much except shrivel the leaves and it might stunt the growth temporarily but it will rebound. Concentrated roundup or other chemical painted ont he stump will do a great job in killing the entire plant. It must be applied immediately following the cut to be most effective.
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  #32  
Old 03-12-2012, 03:47 PM
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Fleshgordon Fleshgordon is offline
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I know a guy that swears he used a deer lure like buck buster or something. Says he sprays it on small trees or overgrowth and they will eat their way through it. Purely hear-say as I have never seen it...
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  #33  
Old 03-12-2012, 09:59 PM
pdiddy71 pdiddy71 is offline
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This course isn't really a public course. It belongs to the Bedford YMCA, not the city or county. So it probably won't receive the foot traffic needed to help trample it down. This particular fairway gets partial sunlight and shade. The resources that I know of are limited for this. Goats are most likely not an option since it is owned by the YMCA. And probably burning is a bad idea because of that also. The baskets are no where near where the grass has been reseeded. I was just showing where people would throw from on that particular hole.
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  #34  
Old 03-13-2012, 08:46 AM
1978 1978 is offline
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ahh but who doesnt love the smell of Napalm in the morning?
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  #35  
Old 03-13-2012, 02:27 PM
biscoe biscoe is offline
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roundup first, cut the remaining woody stuff afterwards.
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  #36  
Old 03-14-2012, 11:09 PM
Royal Hill Royal Hill is offline
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From the rainy pac northwest, so a different forest type. But from what I see in the pictures I'd say...

Mow it into submission. (or weed whack, etc)
Keep the "playable area" clear of branches and piles. Rake it out, and then comfortably mow it until it gets enough casual play to find an equilibrium.

You may find that this leads to one or two cut down events per year, and maybe drop one later as the course gets trafficked in. Or start with a spray, if you're set on it, then do all the above.

What I see on the pics seems relatively open compared to dense forest golf. The main component of fairway clearings is to make it easier to logically track down and find wayward discs. And to eliminate many of the "hiding spots" that you get with brush piles, downer branches, etc. I'm ok with shaggy growing grasses, as long as there are not a ton of tripping downed limbs strewn throughout it.
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  #37  
Old 03-15-2012, 02:34 PM
pdiddy71 pdiddy71 is offline
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The majority of the course is "open" woods. To me that means not alot of tightly grouped trees. The fairway and hole I have in question is. The fairway has the scraggly weeds and saplings, and either side of the fairway is tight further along it goes, the denser the foliage is. Its mainly just the fairway I am concerned with. Its quite possible to trip up and fall due to the weeds and saplings.
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  #38  
Old 03-15-2012, 04:49 PM
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ohtobediscing ohtobediscing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ox View Post
Yet you suggest taking a blowtorch into a wooded area ?

OP, taking a blowtorch into a wooded area is a bad idea.
That's why I said "...and burn the new shoots during the growing season." Not only did I not say "set the woods on fire", I also said "during the growing season", when everything is green and wet, and its difficult to start a fire. Nor did I advocate taking the torch into the woods---from the pictures, you can see he's talking about a cleared fairway with continued growth. And I'm talking about a very small area, not even prescribed-burn size.
As far as pollution, its only carbon monoxide/dioxide, which the plants will refix back into their cellular structure. Unlike Roundup/Arsenal chemical attacks, which poison the surrounding ground and leach into the water table for years.
If you don't know what you're talking about, you shouldn't criticize those who do.
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  #39  
Old 03-15-2012, 05:15 PM
Oklahyzer Oklahyzer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohtobediscing View Post
Unlike Roundup/Arsenal chemical attacks, which poison the surrounding ground and leach into the water table for years.
If you don't know what you're talking about, you shouldn't criticize those who do.
Respectfully, while there are some chemicals that do this, one of the two you mentioned does not. Maybe you need to brush up a bit on your ag-chem knowledge. Any chemical requires knowledgeable and safe application, especially where runoff and proximity to water is an issue. Systemic products applied as either spot treatment or limited-area misting are fairly safe, all things considered. If they aren't used judiciously, then yes, there is risk. Most of these types of products are short-lived and leaching isn't an issue unless applied repeatedly in larger volumes or broad-coverage techniques. Products like Arsenal, Triox, etc., are used more for soil sterilization and would be a poor choice for what the op is needing, both in scope and in potential risk. I'm in favor of non-chemical methods of control and maintenance, but chemicals can be used smartly and safely when needed.
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  #40  
Old 03-19-2012, 02:00 AM
Out of Bounds Out of Bounds is offline
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Sorry I have been traveling for business just getting back to this thread. The use of chemicals will work, but the original post was askign for alternatives which often take a bit more effort. One idea mentioned here was mulch. After you weed the area laying a thick layer of mulch down will often reduce the number of weeds on future trips if the mulch is maintained, butthe mulch also may affect course playability as it can be uncomfortable to walk on.

Mulch is probably the easiest non=toxic solution, just make sure you use weed free mulch or you can compound the problem. Often local landfills will have inexpensive weed free mulch they make from local treecutting operations if you call around.

I am afraid I don't know much about your particular forest area as most of my experience is in the southwest.

@har040- Interesting I have not heard that before. I would be interested in seeing what kind of compaction was done where you mention it not protecting against weeds. In my experience you can always compact the soil to a poitn where plant growth stops or is greatly reduced. but this is rarely desirable unless you are creating a patyhway.

Last edited by Out of Bounds; 03-19-2012 at 02:02 AM. Reason: typos
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