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  #11  
Old 11-14-2012, 04:39 PM
theabacus theabacus is offline
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If forehand throws produced more spin, I would imagine that would result in greater distance. The disc fades and falls to the ground when spin is expended.

A lot of newer players throw forehand because it is easier/quicker to get initial distance. Backhand takes more technique, but with proper form can go further. Distance records are set backhand.
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  #12  
Old 11-14-2012, 04:43 PM
Karl Karl is offline
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Mr. Elbing,

Tests in California (Adler, Hemmings, et al) have shown that for most people* somewhat equally adept at throwing both forehand (sidearm) and backhand, their backhand will produce 150% the rpm of their forehand.

In different tests, a VERY high speed (radar gun "clocked") backhander will release somewhere in the high-70s mph; a VERY high speed forehander / overhander will clock in at the low-90's mph.

So to echo (with supportive data) that which others have said here, 'muzzle velocity' is higher with the forehands but rpms (that which help a LOT in keeping a disc flying straight) are higher with backhands.

Karl
* There are exceptions like Stokely, Wittman, etc., but these are very rare AND even they might only be more like bh is 110% rpms of fh....
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  #13  
Old 11-14-2012, 05:26 PM
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optidiscic optidiscic is offline
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Yep bh spins more but travels slower and a fh spins less but travels faster. Thus the difference in an anhyzer bh and a flick fh.
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  #14  
Old 11-14-2012, 05:46 PM
garublador garublador is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl View Post
Mr. Elbing,

Tests in California (Adler, Hemmings, et al) have shown that for most people* somewhat equally adept at throwing both forehand (sidearm) and backhand, their backhand will produce 150% the rpm of their forehand.

In different tests, a VERY high speed (radar gun "clocked") backhander will release somewhere in the high-70s mph; a VERY high speed forehander / overhander will clock in at the low-90's mph.

So to echo (with supportive data) that which others have said here, 'muzzle velocity' is higher with the forehands but rpms (that which help a LOT in keeping a disc flying straight) are higher with backhands.

Karl
* There are exceptions like Stokely, Wittman, etc., but these are very rare AND even they might only be more like bh is 110% rpms of fh....
I hadn't seen that before, that's interesting.

I'll maintain that discs turning with FH is probably an OAT issue for most people, though.
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  #15  
Old 11-14-2012, 06:16 PM
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Pwingles Pwingles is offline
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Originally Posted by garublador View Post
I hadn't seen that before, that's interesting.

I'll maintain that discs turning with FH is probably an OAT issue for most people, though.
Link to this study?

Same thrower? I would buy that he could get more arm speed with a fh motion, but 20 mph more sounds like a lot. At any rate, I agree with most of what has been said. Especially the levers explanation.
The fh motion is so quick, abrupt, explosive...w/e that it no doubt is faster, sooner. That being said, the grip and overall leverage, combined with getting more of your body involved in the throw, makes the bh a more viable source for distance throws.

It would be interesting to know how soon a fh throw hits cruising speed, exceeds it (if it does on that throw), and how quickly it slows its spin, compared to a bh throw, thrown at approx same mph...
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  #16  
Old 11-20-2012, 04:34 PM
kerplunk kerplunk is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garublador View Post
I don't think that:

A) Sidearm drives generate more spin. It's likely OAT that's causing discs to turn over.

and

B) Worrying about how much spin your drive generates is at all useful. How the disc flies is much more important and you can't control spin enough to make a difference on drives, anyway.
I beg to differ on point B. About a year ago I stared using what I call the Avery Jenkins forehand power grip (middle finger extended, index finger bent and touching the rim behind the middle finger) for long drives, and I noticed my discs fly much more like they are supposed to, i.e. an actual "glide" phase rather than just acceleration and deceleration, resulting in a consistent distance increase of ~50 feet. I am pretty sure this is mostly due to the increased spin created with this grip.

Back to the OP, I also think that FH generally results in less spin but higher "muzzle velocity."
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  #17  
Old 11-20-2012, 04:46 PM
garublador garublador is online now
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Originally Posted by kerplunk View Post
I beg to differ on point B. About a year ago I stared using what I call the Avery Jenkins forehand power grip (middle finger extended, index finger bent and touching the rim behind the middle finger) for long drives, and I noticed my discs fly much more like they are supposed to, i.e. an actual "glide" phase rather than just acceleration and deceleration, resulting in a consistent distance increase of ~50 feet. I am pretty sure this is mostly due to the increased spin created with this grip.

Back to the OP, I also think that FH generally results in less spin but higher "muzzle velocity."
But you fixed your grip, you didn't consciously change how fast the disc spun. Really my point is that worrying about spin won't help you, worrying about what you can change in how you throw will. You don't actually care how fast the disc spins or moves, you only care about how it flies and where it lands.
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