#51  
Old 01-30-2013, 09:40 PM
Cgkdisc Cgkdisc is offline
.:Hall of Fame Member:.
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Twin Cities
Years Playing: 25.5
Courses Played: 586
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 7,709
You simply calculate the elevation difference on each hole and add them up. One of the courses I have lots of quality stats on is Granite Ridge at Highbridge. Even though it starts and ends at the top of the hill, there are 11 downhill holes, 4 uphill and 3 essentially level. That's because several holes have uphill walks from the pin to the next tee as you suggest.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 01-30-2013, 09:54 PM
TheWCG's Avatar
TheWCG TheWCG is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Silverthorne, CO
Years Playing: 6.3
Courses Played: 264
Posts: 3,458
I'm a big fan of granite ridge. I've played it once and the amount of downhill shots were the best I've seen.

Last edited by TheWCG; 01-30-2013 at 09:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 01-30-2013, 10:38 PM
BogeyNoMore's Avatar
BogeyNoMore BogeyNoMore is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Walled Lake, MI
Years Playing: 10.3
Courses Played: 168
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 6,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
I think those terms have a bit of a regional bias, just like the ratings. If everything in one area is completely flat, the course with one small hill is going to get labeled hilly. Same thing with the park style course among desert courses.
To Mashnut's point (lifted from a different thread about Selah Ranch):
Quote:
Originally Posted by grodney View Post
Help me out, those that have played at Selah.

Creekside is listed as Mostly Flat and Lightly Wooded.
Lakeside is listed as Moderately Hilly and Heavily Wooded.

Huh?

Is that right?

If not, please update the listing.

See here for fun comparisons:
http://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums...ad.php?t=81274

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuMagoo View Post
I would consider both to be moderately hilly and lightly/moderately wooded.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Dewgarita View Post
I'd consider both to be pretty damn flat.
StuMagoo and Martin see things a bit differently. The difference is that Stu's played 53 courses: a decent amount, (and certainly more than quite a few folks), but all in Texas. That's his "DG frame of reference." I wouldn't doubt Selahs courses are moderatlely hilly, for Texas.

But having played tons of courses in essentially every (and not just a couple in each state, but many courses in pretty much each state) Martin probably has very little (if any) "regional" bias. His concept of wooded/open, hilly/flat is based on "DG frame of reference" most of us can't even dream of. Wouldn't surprise me if every course he's played in Texas seems flat.


No offense intended toward StuMagoo (or anyone else for that matter). This just seemed like a perfect example to illustrate how regional bias can affect what we read.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 01-30-2013, 10:40 PM
BogeyNoMore's Avatar
BogeyNoMore BogeyNoMore is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Walled Lake, MI
Years Playing: 10.3
Courses Played: 168
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 6,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgkdisc View Post
You simply calculate the elevation difference on each hole and add them up. One of the courses I have lots of quality stats on is Granite Ridge at Highbridge. Even though it starts and ends at the top of the hill, there are 11 downhill holes, 4 uphill and 3 essentially level. That's because several holes have uphill walks from the pin to the next tee as you suggest.
thx!
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldsCoolestGuy View Post
I'm a big fan of granite ridge. I've played it once and the amount of downhill shots were the best I've seen.
that's gotta help peg the fun-o-meter, which is likely a major contributing factor towards it being listed in the top 10.

Last edited by BogeyNoMore; 01-30-2013 at 10:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 01-30-2013, 10:44 PM
Fishy Fishy is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Colorado
Years Playing: 4.7
Courses Played: 50
Throwing Style: RHFH
Posts: 1,752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadjo View Post
North Georgia...the top 3rd of the state is considered foothills of the Smoky Mountains and extreme Northeast Georgia is in the mountains. Might not be as high elevation wise as places out west but when you compare North Georgia to, let's say, Indiana or Kansas, then yes, Georgia has plenty of courses you can consider hilly.
.


Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:07 PM
Dave242's Avatar
Dave242 Dave242 is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Years Playing: 20.3
Courses Played: 366
Throwing Style: LHBH
Posts: 4,347
Yeah yeah yeah.....CO has a reputation of overrating things around here.

On a more on topic note, you do not need big mountains to make it very hilly. If say 9 holes have elevation of 20'+ and another 3-5 have have elevation of 10-20', that is a very hilly course in the scheme of things (in the top 1/3 of hilliness).
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:11 PM
Sadjo's Avatar
Sadjo Sadjo is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Carolina
Years Playing: 34.5
Courses Played: 101
Posts: 2,095
I played the AM world in Fort Collins CO in 1993 and don't recall those courses being very hilly. Even Grandma Millers Farm Course up at 10-thousand feet elevation had more flat holes than holes that played up or down hill.
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:12 PM
optidiscic's Avatar
optidiscic optidiscic is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Discopolis Pennsylvania
Years Playing: 12.3
Courses Played: 155
Posts: 6,564
Send a message via Yahoo to optidiscic
quite often those mountain courses don't play as well as courses that utilize "hills"

I am the only disc golfer in the world who doesnt get excited about mountain golf
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:13 PM
optidiscic's Avatar
optidiscic optidiscic is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Discopolis Pennsylvania
Years Playing: 12.3
Courses Played: 155
Posts: 6,564
Send a message via Yahoo to optidiscic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadjo View Post
I played the AM world in Fort Collins CO in 1993 and don't recall those courses being very hilly. Even Grandma Millers Farm Course up at 10-thousand feet elevation had more flat holes than holes that played up or down hill.
I was gonna say I'd take the rolling hills of Kentucky over some big boring mountain anyday
Reply With Quote
 

  #60  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:24 PM
Fishy Fishy is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Colorado
Years Playing: 4.7
Courses Played: 50
Throwing Style: RHFH
Posts: 1,752
Ft collins isn't exactly hills, much less mountains. I was thinking either Beaver or Bailey.. or Leadville as mountain courses.
I was just poking fun at the "Mountains" back east since I live higher than any place east of the Mississippi. I've hiked some brutal hills with serious steep elevation gains in Michigan, but your mountains back there aren't very tall, or very rugged. They are older than the Rockies, more like our foothills.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.