#11  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:01 PM
bhadella bhadella is offline
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If you live locally in Columbus join the Columbus Flyers Disc Golf Club. Lots of good events and a great way to get some "competitive" rounds in before playing something as big as a National DG event (like the Hambrick Memorial).
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  #12  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:05 PM
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Jax11 Jax11 is offline
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Nothing about your tournament eve ritual Roman? haha Get them discs clean!

I have one answer to being prepared for a tournament: McDonalds Breakfast Burrito

On a serious note, I will say that of the majority of people I have played with in tournaments are really nice people. If you treat them with respect and how you would want to be treated most will return that attitude.

As far as dealing with rules sticklers; if I were in your situation I would make sure to let them know you are new to the tournament scene. Also, its something simple, but if you have a weird stance coming out of the rough, or one with tough footing, just ask your card if they deem that you are in a legal stance to throw. You can also ask if you are outside the circle before committing to a jump putt. I have found that when I do this rules sticklers are more apt to approach me in a friendly manner and they tend to warn me before I break a rule, instead of calling me on it after I break it.

The rounds are definitely slower, I try to keep myself busy in between shots either talking to other competitors or keeping my own score through out.

Lastly, bring extra socks. Makes that second round that much more comfortable.

Sorry I talked about more what I do during, but I think what notroman said before me was very valuable and good advice, I don't have much to add.
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  #13  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:06 PM
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811rv 811rv is offline
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BHMO is A Tier this year. Check YouTube videos on past BHMO events to get an idea about the courses. The famous dam shot is real cool. Also postage sized green by dam on West course is cool too (took me a while to figure this hole out
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  #14  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:09 PM
burdphil burdphil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcr_russell View Post
When the round begins try and have friendly conversation with your group. If there is enough of an air of positivity and friendliness among the group the whiners either don't pitch in or they isolate themselves from the other 3-4 of you.
I have to respectfully disagree with this from my perspective. I find that constant small talk distracts the hell out of me and makes me play much more slowly and poorly. If someone talks to me I'm always friendly and don't blow them off, but otherwise I'm pretty quiet. If that makes me a "whiner" than so be it I guess... it's just what works best for me.
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  #15  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:11 PM
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notroman notroman is offline
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Originally Posted by 811rv View Post
Gotta to deal with any weather conditions during tournament rounds so I bring rain gear, umbrella, extra shoes, extra socks, hat, sunblock and some other things. You might want to bring stool to sit and rest while waiting for others to throw etc... I carry energy bars to fuel me up when my fuel is low. Get mentally excited to challenge the course in any conditions. I do see some players carry music player to help them relax and focus better.
I definitely play with music in my ears. I get distracted really easily, so the less sudden noises in my routine/throw the better for me. I usually only do it when I throw, then I take one earbud out when I'm done so I can still socialize with the players on my card. Unless they're having a bad round and are loud about it. Then I keep the music in Another benefit.

I should also clarify that for me personally, adjusting casual play for tournaments meant playing the high percentage shots, not laying down a mini for every throw. A big part to scoring well is being committed to your shot, but you want to be sure it's a shot you can execute consistently, not some crazy gap that if you hit you can score. I see this a lot among ams, especially in the lower divisions. They go for these crazy lines that are beyond their ability to hit consistently, then they get a bad break and complain about it and take high numbers. My first time winning intermediate was when I finally decided to stop trying to score on every hole, even if I felt there was a decent chance of me getting it, if an error meant scrambling to save par. I just threw hyzers when I could, laid up, took the easy threes. I picked up birdies when the opportunity presented itself, but I never forced them. At the same time the people on my card were more aggressive, playing outside the intermediate level of play, hitting trees, giving away strokes.

Obviously in advanced you want to pick up more birdies, but the same principal applies. Play within your game. Throw the high percentage shots and avoid trouble. Most of the time the winner of a division does not win because they went after every birdie, but because their level of play allowed them to throw the more aggressive lines while still having it be a high percentage shot for them. Essentially you win by being a better/smarter player, not by trying to chase strokes.

That is what I had to adjust in my casual play Finding out where my limits were, finding those high percentage shots, and playing smart. Once I started doing that in casual play, then it became a no brainer in tournament rounds, and it took a lot of the indecision out of each throw for me. Now I just combine that with field work to improve my consistency and shot selection so that I can be more aggressive on the course without actually going beyond my skill level and getting into trouble off the tee.
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  #16  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:12 PM
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notroman notroman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdphil View Post
I have to respectfully disagree with this from my perspective. I find that constant small talk distracts the hell out of me and makes me play much more slowly and poorly. If someone talks to me I'm always friendly and don't blow them off, but otherwise I'm pretty quiet. If that makes me a "whiner" than so be it I guess... it's just what works best for me.
Yeah, but usually you can tell when a person doesn't want to talk. I don't bother those people. I know some people need to stay in the zone to keep focused and don't like being distracted by others. You're usually not going to find an entire card full of people like that, so there's always someone to chat with.
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  #17  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:23 PM
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gcr_russell gcr_russell is offline
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Originally Posted by notroman View Post
Yeah, but usually you can tell when a person doesn't want to talk. I don't bother those people. I know some people need to stay in the zone to keep focused and don't like being distracted by others. You're usually not going to find an entire card full of people like that, so there's always someone to chat with.
Agreed. There are whiners and quiet people. The quiet people get congratulated on their good shots and a quieter friendliness. The whiners are allowed to dwell on their own apart from the group.

When the entire card is quieter and interacts less the Whiners can really ruin the round. If their negativity is the most vocal part of the card, and they feel like their negativity is welcome I can guarantee you won't be enjoying yourself near as much as you could. If we're not out there to have fun, then what are we doing?

And quiet folk.. keep doing what you're doing. You are good to go.
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  #18  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:24 PM
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dusty5150 dusty5150 is offline
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Originally Posted by Mike C View Post
What things do you do to prepare? How is the round different for you?
1. Putt. Lots. Then putt more. I find if I'm comfortable putting, everything else just falls into place. I also try and stretch and warm up by throwing half a dozen putters/mids. That's about it.

2. Mentally I try to treat a tournament round just like any other round I play. Of course, the only way to benefit from that is if you play casual rounds like tournament rounds, which I try and do. Think of it as just another day in the park.
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  #19  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:25 PM
BillTard BillTard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcr_russell View Post
Agreed. There are whiners and quiet people. The quiet people get congratulated on their good shots and a quieter friendliness. The whiners are allowed to dwell on their own apart from the group.

When the entire card is quieter and interacts less the Whiners can really ruin the round. If their negativity is the most vocal part of the card, and they feel like their negativity is welcome I can guarantee you won't be enjoying yourself near as much as you could. If we're not out there to have fun, then what are we doing?

And quiet folk.. keep doing what you're doing. You are good to go.
I want to print this out and hand it to everyone I play with.
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  #20  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:26 PM
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gcr_russell gcr_russell is offline
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Originally Posted by dusty5150 View Post
1. Putt. Lots. Then putt more. I find if I'm comfortable putting, everything else just falls into place. I also try and stretch and warm up by throwing half a dozen putters/mids. That's about it.
And putt within a range you will make 90%. Right before a tournament isn't the time to improve your skills, but a time to make sure they are as tight as possible. Your mental game will strengthen much more when you make 9/10 from 25' more than when you make 3/10 from 40'.
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