#11  
Old 06-05-2013, 11:55 AM
fusan fusan is offline
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I've never figured out what the hammer drills are are supposed to do.
Mayby Im doing it all wrong but I just didnt see the point of them.
Is it getting the feeling for the snap? Anybody care to explain?
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  #12  
Old 06-05-2013, 12:12 PM
Mocheez Mocheez is online now
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Focus on the disc. You want to be able to feel the weight of the disc. That is the aim of the hammer pounds. Once you can feel the weight of the disc using the hammer pounds, incorporate that feeling into the right pec drills / closed shoulder drills. Don't accelerate until you can feel the weight of the disc.

From there, add the reach back and subsequent one step, two step, cross step. This recent video from Feldberg regarding weight shift and hip rotation is excellent... Weight Shift
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2013, 12:50 PM
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jrawk jrawk is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loki993 View Post
What exactly is elbow chop?

Im having a lot of trouble getting the hit and snap, Ive tried all the drills...Im thinking has to have something to do with something I'm fundamentally doing wrong....
to explain this forget about your elbow for a minute... think of a karate chop with your hand. your hand is extending to make impact with your enemy.

Now instead of your hand, think about throwing an elbow at your enemy. in order to do so, your elbow is bent and coming forward at your enemy. Elbow Chop!

Apply that to your throw, your elbow should be elbow chopping your target before your forearm/hand/disc pivot around and karate chop your target.

So, somebody that does not have a lot of elbow-chop is straight-arming the disc (straight-arm, not strong-arm). The Swedish Style is a technique that does not use a lot of elbow chop. Feldberg is a good example.
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  #14  
Old 06-05-2013, 01:16 PM
fusan fusan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mocheez View Post
Focus on the disc. You want to be able to feel the weight of the disc. That is the aim of the hammer pounds. Once you can feel the weight of the disc using the hammer pounds, incorporate that feeling into the right pec drills / closed shoulder drills. Don't accelerate until you can feel the weight of the disc.

From there, add the reach back and subsequent one step, two step, cross step. This recent video from Feldberg regarding weight shift and hip rotation is excellent... Weight Shift
What I understand from this is... feeling the weight of the disc comes from the sling out of the arm, elbow and wrist. So the weight is actually the resistance from the rotation of the disc? The more leverage you can create with the arm and elbow, the more weight of the disc you can feel?
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  #15  
Old 06-05-2013, 01:44 PM
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Dan Ensor Dan Ensor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loki993 View Post
What exactly is elbow chop?

Im having a lot of trouble getting the hit and snap, Ive tried all the drills...Im thinking has to have something to do with something I'm fundamentally doing wrong....
Me and Jrawk need to get together on our terms. What he described needs to happen, but is not what I'm talking about.

What I'm talking about is the elbow has to stop going forward and start moving rotationally to your right (assuming rhbh). When it starts moving rotationally, it swings your lower arm. That swinging of the lower arm is the whip-like action you're looking for.



My biggest problem with the hammer pound drills was trying to make them more complicated than they are. Just put a nail in a board, and try to drive it with a disc with your throwing grip. It's that easy.
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  #16  
Old 06-05-2013, 02:49 PM
loki993 loki993 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrawk View Post
to explain this forget about your elbow for a minute... think of a karate chop with your hand. your hand is extending to make impact with your enemy.

Now instead of your hand, think about throwing an elbow at your enemy. in order to do so, your elbow is bent and coming forward at your enemy. Elbow Chop!

Apply that to your throw, your elbow should be elbow chopping your target before your forearm/hand/disc pivot around and karate chop your target.

So, somebody that does not have a lot of elbow-chop is straight-arming the disc (straight-arm, not strong-arm). The Swedish Style is a technique that does not use a lot of elbow chop. Feldberg is a good example.
Right an Garrett Gurthie is the sale way I was watching him throw last thursday, tried to emulate it a bit and miserably failed lol.

so let me ask you this, once the elbow can no longer move forward then what happens? Do you swing the elbow back or your forearm out?

this is good because this is the part of the throw that I least understand, is the most important and the one no one explains.

I've watched tons of videos and read everything I could find trying to find it. They all explain how to get there, but don't explain what to do or what happens once you're there like it happens naturally or something, which obviously it doesn't.....
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  #17  
Old 06-05-2013, 03:18 PM
Mocheez Mocheez is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusan View Post
What I understand from this is... feeling the weight of the disc comes from the sling out of the arm, elbow and wrist. So the weight is actually the resistance from the rotation of the disc? The more leverage you can create with the arm and elbow, the more weight of the disc you can feel?
Yes, that is essentially correct. You have to put your body in position to manipulate the weight shift. If you move too fast, too early, the disc will slip out before it makes its way aroud the arc.
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  #18  
Old 06-05-2013, 03:33 PM
wake911 wake911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loki993 View Post
Right an Garrett Gurthie is the sale way I was watching him throw last thursday, tried to emulate it a bit and miserably failed lol.

so let me ask you this, once the elbow can no longer move forward then what happens? Do you swing the elbow back or your forearm out?

this is good because this is the part of the throw that I least understand, is the most important and the one no one explains.

I've watched tons of videos and read everything I could find trying to find it. They all explain how to get there, but don't explain what to do or what happens once you're there like it happens naturally or something, which obviously it doesn't.....
I have never once thought about my arm after pulling my elbow through(other than insuring i follow through with my WHOLE body after release). The rotation I exert with my hips, pushing with my legs, forces my arm to whip through since I've already started that motion with the hip turn into the "lawnmower pull". For me the rest happens naturally. I can't stop my arm from finishing and extending for the release. I'm not forcing anything, but the previous forces (legs, hips, pull) just make it happen. I know that isn't much help overall.

The only things I've EVER thought about while throwing for distance.
1. Reach back - most important
2. Hip rotation - 2nd most important
3. Strong straight pull through
4. Smooth Follow through on the same plane as the expected flight plane.

Just last night I was helping a guy, and i had him do some stand and deliver throws. All round he was skying discs, and throwing with little power. By doing stand still throws, with an almost over exaggerated reach back. he was able to get the feel of the proper pull through, and released some really great drives, that out threw his in-round run-up throws.

take a look at this video. This is truly what i think about when I'm having a distance issue, so i can remind myself of the importance of hips in my throw. Obviously the way the arms come through is different, but the idea of the importance of the hips to generate the "easy power" that you see the big arm pros have, is the same.

Watch Griffey's hips. They explode open and then his upper body follows suit with immense power. He was never a big guy, but could belt the heck out of the ball because he used his whole body.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...ZvSzKn3U#t=15s
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  #19  
Old 06-05-2013, 03:45 PM
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BennettUA BennettUA is offline
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^^ agreed, and one of my all-time favorite sports families(Griffeys)

Watch baseball's power hitters, and you'll see more of the same that you see from the best in disc golf. Imagine these guys throwing discs:

-- Legs drive forward, moving all that stored energy of your body weight toward the target.

-- Hips blast through, using the biggest/most muscles at once.

-- Arms/elbows/wrists/hands come through at the end, in that order, and at the highest speed.

-- Follow through with your whole body.

Biggest differences are that baseball players have to have their eyes forward before they start their swing, and often they have to abandon their swing mechanics to chase a moving baseball with a wooden stick.

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  #20  
Old 06-05-2013, 11:32 PM
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wake and Bennett are spot on
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