#21  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:00 PM
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dashiellx dashiellx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgkdisc View Post
FYI - Tech standards spot checks have been done for several years now and the PDGA follows up on all reports from players when a disc may have a problem.
What do these "spot checks" entail?
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  #22  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:08 PM
Cgkdisc Cgkdisc is offline
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Jason at the IDGC randomly selects discs every so often and checks them for max weight and flexibility. They sell most if not all of the manufacturers discs there so he has a wide ranging sample pool. And the PDGA regularly gets tips from members about certain discs and those are checked out. The early Prodigy problems were flushed out from the IDGC testing for example.
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  #23  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:13 PM
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mashnut mashnut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobwilson View Post
I absolutely agree with you that consistency is an issue, but I have a hard time seeing how the PDGA can actively enforce this. The PDGA does not have the resources to set up shop as QA/QC within disc manufacturers.

I do like the idea of random spot checking. The PDGA can go to a retailer, randomly grab a stack of new discs and put them through the standard testing (flex, weight, etc.). Again though, this requires resources. I've worked in a laboratory environment for 10+ years. If a sanctioning body is going to levee some kind of sanctions against an equipment manufacturer, it will have to set up Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), internal QA/QC and be subject to audits.

I believe the importance of technical specifications must be put in the hands of tournament directors, but I also understand the headache this would create for tournament directors.

I don't believe there is a correct answer to your question. I believe it is something that must be addressed, but it is going to take valuable resources to come up with any kind of viable solution.
You mention sanctions against manufacturers. Do you think that any of the manufacturers would be willing to pay the PDGA or do an expensive recall of a bunch of discs for being just slightly out of spec? MY guess is that those manufacturers would simply stop seeking PDGA approval and continue making their money off all the casual disc golfers who couldn't care less about that approval. The PDGA has absolutely no authority over manufacturers if it comes down to something like that, and taking a punitive approach IMO would be the wrong way to go.
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  #24  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeverett View Post
To me, this is the one absolutely unacceptable answer to this question. Enforcement of equipment standards absolutely *cannot* end up entirely in the hands of tournament directors, without the equipment standards being essentially dropped entirely. TD's simply do not have the time or resources to verify the material standards for every disc in every players' bag. Right now, as I've mentioned before, it is *solely* the culture of disc golf that has prevented every player at every event questioning the legality every disc in every players' bag. In the rulebook, it is entirely within the rights/responsibilities of players to do this, and entirely within the rights/responsibilities of the TD to enforce. This needs to change, one way or another.

Edit: I like essentially everything else you've had to say, but this one issue may be a deal-breaker for me.
I agree with you. I didn't do a great job of communicating what I was trying to say. I should have said "enforcement" rather than "importance".

As I said, making tournament directors wear another hat is a bad idea. We already have enough on our plates.

It is our responsibility though to enforce the rules, but not to necessarily seek out rulebreakers. This lies in the hands of the players.

The real question: How can a culture be created where players are encouraged to be adhere and enforce rules? This goes well beyond technical standards as well.
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  #25  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
You mention sanctions against manufacturers. Do you think that any of the manufacturers would be willing to pay the PDGA or do an expensive recall of a bunch of discs for being just slightly out of spec? MY guess is that those manufacturers would simply stop seeking PDGA approval and continue making their money off all the casual disc golfers who couldn't care less about that approval. The PDGA has absolutely no authority over manufacturers if it comes down to something like that, and taking a punitive approach IMO would be the wrong way to go.
I agree with you completely. I only brought up sanctions because I have seen it elsewhere listed as a possible deterrent to inconsistency.

The fact of the matter is that regulating manufacturer inconsistency is not a viable option for the PDGA. As jeverett stated, this lies in the hands of competitors. Unfortunately, I think it is going to be a long time until players are questioning the weights of other players' putters.
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  #26  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobwilson View Post
I agree with you completely. I only brought up sanctions because I have seen it elsewhere listed as a possible deterrent to inconsistency.

The fact of the matter is that regulating manufacturer inconsistency is not a viable option for the PDGA. As jeverett stated, this lies in the hands of competitors. Unfortunately, I think it is going to be a long time until players are questioning the weights of other players' putters.
Thanks for responding, I'm glad that you see it as an issue but not one the PDGA should have as a top priority right now. I have yet to see an instance where a player used a disc that should have been illegal and gained a competitive advantage from it, so I would much rather see the focus on some of the other things you've mentioned.
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  #27  
Old 06-17-2013, 02:04 PM
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There was some discussion over the weekend about ladies dress code.
It seems to me that this code needs to be updated.

I'd support a women's committee to come up with a revised code.
I would certainly not offer any opinions, but would completely support whatever decision the ladies came up with.
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  #28  
Old 06-17-2013, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobwilson View Post
There was some discussion over the weekend about ladies dress code.
It seems to me that this code needs to be updated.

I'd support a women's committee to come up with a revised code.
I would certainly not offer any opinions, but would completely support whatever decision the ladies came up with.
I would agree. I like the idea of asking competitors at the top events to look professional but I think the current wording allows for some people to follow the letter of the rule and look like crap and others to look very professional and still not be following the current rules on that.
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  #29  
Old 06-17-2013, 02:48 PM
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And now there is this.

https://www.facebook.com/JOBForBOD
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  #30  
Old 06-18-2013, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobwilson View Post
There was some discussion over the weekend about ladies dress code.
It seems to me that this code needs to be updated.

I'd support a women's committee to come up with a revised code.
I would certainly not offer any opinions, but would completely support whatever decision the ladies came up with.

There is already a PDGA Women's Committee. They will be reviewing the current female dress code. They will make a recommendation to the Competition Committee, which will then make a recommendation to the PDGA BOD.
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