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  #21  
Old 02-27-2013, 12:02 AM
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Bultx1215 Bultx1215 is offline
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Surface applied once dry and cured, you can get away with most anything. Integral color, you need to be careful. No telling how some of that stuff will react to the admixtures.
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  #22  
Old 03-13-2013, 10:09 PM
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scarpfish scarpfish is offline
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I'm of the opinion that tee pads much like tee signs are a utilitarian object first and any extra effort and expense to make them aesthetically pleasing is going to be in vain when you consider the toll that usage, the elements, and unfortunately vandalism is going to take on them. Putting simple tee marker signage like say these, and adding color bands to distinguish tees will work just as well, and when the inevitable happens, sprucing things up should be cheap.

And there's nothing wrong with paint on the back corners like was shown earlier. Looks a little tacky, but it gets the job done.
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  #23  
Old 07-11-2013, 03:50 PM
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jkdisc jkdisc is offline
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it took me awhile but i got a pic of the red tee at my local course

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  #24  
Old 07-12-2013, 10:54 AM
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joshmo65 joshmo65 is offline
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That looks slick.

You can actually dye the whole batch of concrete straight from the plant. This would probably be the best way so that the stamp doesn't wear off. This picture is a project I did in school where we dyed the lower concrete red and the upper black. I see no reason why this wouldn't work great for teepads.
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  #25  
Old 07-12-2013, 11:12 AM
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DiscChainBasket18 DiscChainBasket18 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
Whatever you do, make sure it isn't causing a slick surface on top of the pads. A course in the Chicago area has tee pads with some kind of green coloring, but when there's even a tiny bit of moisture they turn extremely slippery. Another option is to just paint the front corners, it'll be less expensive and still obviously shows which pad is which. Here are a couple pictures from James Dillon Park in IN with red and blue tees:



^^ To me this is the cleanest idea I've seen for colorizing your tee pads!
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  #26  
Old 07-12-2013, 11:32 PM
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Kenny53691 Kenny53691 is offline
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I really like the dyed corners!
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  #27  
Old 07-17-2013, 01:00 PM
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JeremyKShort JeremyKShort is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
Whatever you do, make sure it isn't causing a slick surface on top of the pads. A course in the Chicago area has tee pads with some kind of green coloring, but when there's even a tiny bit of moisture they turn extremely slippery. Another option is to just paint the front corners, it'll be less expensive and still obviously shows which pad is which. Here are a couple pictures from James Dillon Park in IN with red and blue tees:



Something similar to this, I've seen courses put a number in the front corner. A metal number in the corner doesn't make much of a slip hazard, rarely is anyone in the corner. A colored number would tell you hole number and tee color.
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  #28  
Old 07-17-2013, 01:55 PM
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DiscinFiend DiscinFiend is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
Whatever you do, make sure it isn't causing a slick surface on top of the pads. A course in the Chicago area has tee pads with some kind of green coloring, but when there's even a tiny bit of moisture they turn extremely slippery. Another option is to just paint the front corners, it'll be less expensive and still obviously shows which pad is which. Here are a couple pictures from James Dillon Park in IN with red and blue tees:



Great idea, I defiantly recommend doing it this way
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  #29  
Old 07-17-2013, 01:59 PM
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NOStheBOSS NOStheBOSS is offline
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I would just say spraypaint the desired color on the back of the teepad. Cheap, easy, won't add any additional slickness
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  #30  
Old 07-18-2013, 08:19 AM
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Kenny53691 Kenny53691 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOStheBOSS View Post
I would just say spraypaint the desired color on the back of the teepad. Cheap, easy, won't add any additional slickness
The only thing bad about that would be that you'd probably have to repaint them twice a year to keep them looking "bright" with the weathering.
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