#31  
Old 07-29-2013, 04:04 PM
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Kenny53691 Kenny53691 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hammer View Post
The only benefit I feel I get from a run-up is allowing me to set the rhythm of my throw, and to load my hips more from the x-step.
About the same here!
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  #32  
Old 07-29-2013, 04:18 PM
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fountg fountg is offline
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I feel like when I do a full run up I end up releasing late and throwing wayyyy off to the right. Something about the timing, idk. 90% of my drives are an X-step pattern of 1 slow step then a quicker X-step. During the quicker X-step I will pivot my hips away and then rip all the way around and through. But it all ends up just being 2-3 steps.
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  #33  
Old 07-29-2013, 05:32 PM
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Dan Ensor Dan Ensor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sneakytiki View Post
In one of his articles Blake mentions that how quickly a disc flips to flat on a hyzer flip release is a good indicator of how much snap you are getting. The quicker it flips, the more snap you have. More snap, more spin, more stable. Always thought that was a good indicator, for anyone wondering "Do I has snaps?"
I don't think that's right; at least it's not what you made me think of.

Somewhere, Blake says something like "If you want to know if your throw is snap dominated or speed dominated, look at the flight. If it flips right out of your hand, you're speed dominated; if the flip is delayed, you're snap dominated."

I think I'm right ... it's been a while since I've read it.
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  #34  
Old 07-29-2013, 09:05 PM
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DiscFifty DiscFifty is online now
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Who and why did someone first call this a "run" up? It really is more like a walk up, or at the least a "slow speed up". When I see young players literally taking 7 steps and running at first it's a bit comical, most seem to do a "stutter step" dance, etc, etc. There is no doubt they would throw farther, expend less energy if they took fewer steps, slowed down, etc, etc. I've had a chance to see several local pros and all of them start very slowly in their walk up and right before the last step, that's when the take off (acceleration) happens.

I only use the x-step for max d. Other wise it's a combination of single step and stand still throws. Like others have said, the more accuracy needed, the less I move.
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  #35  
Old 07-30-2013, 09:14 AM
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Nasty Nate Nasty Nate is offline
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So more snap comes from bending/loading your wrist more on your setup? I used to throw like that but have been doing it a bit less after reading a bunch of different dg stuff. This is probably the missing link in my throws right now...
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  #36  
Old 07-30-2013, 09:19 AM
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sneakytiki sneakytiki is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Ensor View Post
I don't think that's right; at least it's not what you made me think of.

Somewhere, Blake says something like "If you want to know if your throw is snap dominated or speed dominated, look at the flight. If it flips right out of your hand, you're speed dominated; if the flip is delayed, you're snap dominated."

I think I'm right ... it's been a while since I've read it.
Ok, yes, I guess I should have said its an indicator of your snap to speed ratio, rather than a measure of snap. But if you increase your snap without changing the speed, you should see a quicker flip.
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  #37  
Old 07-30-2013, 11:09 PM
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Stardoggy Stardoggy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fountg View Post
I feel like when I do a full run up I end up releasing late and throwing wayyyy off to the right. Something about the timing, idk. 90% of my drives are an X-step pattern of 1 slow step then a quicker X-step. During the quicker X-step I will pivot my hips away and then rip all the way around and through. But it all ends up just being 2-3 steps.

This is where I'm at, as well. It's one of those things that seems counter-intuitive, but I'm constantly having to remind myself to slow down, and let my game progress naturally. I think it's a function of wanting to throw 400' now, DAMMIT. I'm still searching for that elusive "hit", and have stalled out at about 320-330, but I can feel it getting better and better.
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  #38  
Old 07-31-2013, 12:12 AM
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Kodachrome Kodachrome is offline
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^^you and me both, brotha.

i vary between a scissor step and a standstill. i take 3 SLOW steps, starting with my right - it's unnecessary, but it helps me get my timing. i've found it gives me time to match my backward extension with my front foot hitting. i tried speeding it up and failed hard. currently i hit about 300-320 with my axis, and my fairway drivers don't go much farther - usually exactly the same, actually. max D will go longer, obviously, but i always wind up going back to building from the bottom up. i don't think i've ever really felt the "hit" either.
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  #39  
Old 07-31-2013, 12:44 AM
tampora tampora is offline
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I liken a good run-up to the approach in bowling: slow, accelerating, controlled, and entirely done with purpose.
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  #40  
Old 07-31-2013, 12:45 AM
justinf67 justinf67 is offline
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Its kind of funny. I have played with a standstill for the past 4-5 months. I could get 300-330ish from a standstill with pretty good accuracy. I have tried to implement a runup a few times during the past few months and failed. I finally keyed in on what I was doing wrong. I turned back way too early in the runup. I delay and now I feel smooth in my runup. Power has increased a bit. Now, in my runup, I feel my timing getting better. Throwing drives farther than ever before. This has come with a hiccup though. My standstill now feels forced. Has thrown off everything else, lol. The power increase has my drivers doing different things. Kinda crazy. I feel like the runup is needed to time things and build power from the uncorking. I hit the limit on standstills, for me, I couldnt throw farther till I got my runup down.
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