#11  
Old 09-06-2013, 04:08 PM
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megamerican megamerican is offline
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3D printers are great for making prototypes and small runs of specialty parts. The cost for high quality 3D printers are going down drastically each year and the usefulness of them is increasing exponentially.

As for making discs, it would be interesting to see some hobbyists do it and it wouldn't surprise me if some disc making companies use one to make prototypes.
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  #12  
Old 09-06-2013, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fritothedog View Post
I played with this in high school. My idea was to have one "base" (read flight plate and part of the rim) with detachable profiles. Basically a flight plate with removable rims. At this point I didn't realize that flight plates varied all that much.

When I threw it the rims almost always came apart but the ABS plastic took a few hits and was ok. I didn't throw it very hard though, just in our classroom. I bet a tree would eat the ABS pretty quickly. The way our 3D printer worked was it layered the plastic. What is a small knick in DX would turn into rips and gashes probably on an ABS printed disc.
Very interesting. It wouldn't surprise me in the future to see removable/replaceable rims become the next step in disc technology. Probably not for a long time but it'll have to go somewhere.

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Originally Posted by Lukeslayerski View Post
They're good enough to make gun parts with so I don't know.
The 3d printed pistol only fires once though, unless we're talking about something different.
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  #13  
Old 09-06-2013, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by JTacoma03 View Post
The 3d printed pistol only fires once though, unless we're talking about something different.
There are a lot of different gun parts being made with 3D printers. The most famous one is the lower receiver for an AR-15, because according to law that IS the gun. The lower receiver is what needs to have a serial number on it and tracked.

It is perfectly legal to make your own gun and not have it registered. So if one made a lower receiver you could order all other parts for the gun and not have to go through any legal obstacles.

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  #14  
Old 09-10-2013, 02:32 PM
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whatXhappened243 whatXhappened243 is offline
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ive used 3d printing methods to produce parts for my senior design course for mechanical engineering, and IMO they are not particularly practical for disc making. My observations come from experiences using technology available at the university level and I just don't see it happening for a few reasons...

1) Cost. For one thing, 3d printers aren't cheap. Comparing the cost of 3d printers to common inkjet printers is like comparing Kias to Cadillacs. They're just in two different leagues. Also, printing a disc would require an enormous of plastic.

2) Time Required. The amount of time and plastic that would be required to print a disc is HUGE. While not an issue for injection molding, 3d printing is typically done using a 2 polymers extruded from a "printer nozzle" to lay a single layer of plastic at a time. And the parts produced typically take FOREVER to be completed, to produce an object as large as a disc would take somewhere on the order of 2-3 weeks (at least) to be complete.

3) Resolution. Like i said before, objects produced using 3d printers are done in layers, kind of like a pyramid. So there is a small step that as produced as each successive layer is stacked on top of each other. IMO there us no doubt that each of these steps, albeit very small (theres about 50 layers per inch), would greatly affect the aerodynamics of the rim and flight plate. The technology required to give the smooth profile seen in golf discs just isnt there yet.

4) Hardness. Not to be confused with the strength of the part... In my experience, pieces produced from 3d printers tend to be very brittle. We dropped a piece off a 3 ft desk onto a linoleum floor and it cracked in two.

Basically, when it comes to prototyping on the small scale, 3d printers are great. But really, they are better for showing form rather than function.
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  #15  
Old 09-10-2013, 02:41 PM
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10 years from now 3D printers won't be printing in plastic, it'll be all about Graphene. The revolution is coming.
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2013, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New013 View Post
10 years from now 3D printers won't be printing in plastic, it'll be all about Graphene. The revolution is coming.
Graphene is strong, for sure. But isn't it a single layer of carbon in a chain link fence orientation? How would once extrude that? I don't know anything about the 3D printing industry by the way, just curious about this revolution you speak of.
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  #17  
Old 09-10-2013, 02:52 PM
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it'll be layered just like plastics, they're just scratching the surface of what can be done with graphene. it's the strongest material on the planet and it's flexible and conducts electricity; not to mention it's extremely abundant.
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  #18  
Old 09-10-2013, 05:33 PM
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I think what it would be good for is seeing what a new design would look and fly like. Print a few of them, see how they go, if it's good use a printed disc as a basis for a mold.
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