#21  
Old 10-04-2013, 11:39 AM
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ejvogie ejvogie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MNThrower View Post
That's a fair statement but I think you underestimate her strength. I bet she's got a lot more in that arm than some of us! I also think you are confusing what I am saying regarding arm strength.

Just because you have arm strength doesn't mean you can throw far.

But a new player likely hasn't worked certain muscles hard enough yet in order to throw the faster discs.
It's not strength. It's form and timing and snap. I think you're getting arm speed confused with arm strength.

If I throw a mamba with only my arm instead of using my whole body, it will turn right (RHBH) shortly after it leaves my hand. If I use good form, it will go straight for a while and turn later in flight because of the higher amount of spin imparted on the disc.
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  #22  
Old 10-04-2013, 12:58 PM
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knettles knettles is offline
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As far as learning with or without a run-up goes, I think that depends. I know some players focus too much on the run-up, which causes errors in their throw. Learning to throw without a run-up can help simplify the process, and the player will be able to focus more on the mechanics of the throw.

Personally, I think the best way is to start learning from a standstill or one step. After starting to learn the basics, then you could build up to a 2 or 3 step run-up.
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  #23  
Old 10-04-2013, 01:29 PM
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Stardoggy Stardoggy is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knettles View Post
As far as learning with or without a run-up goes, I think that depends. I know some players focus too much on the run-up, which causes errors in their throw. Learning to throw without a run-up can help simplify the process, and the player will be able to focus more on the mechanics of the throw.

Personally, I think the best way is to start learning from a standstill or one step. After starting to learn the basics, then you could build up to a 2 or 3 step run-up.
Here's what I've learned in my first two years.

"Run-Up" can be a misnomer. Sure, you see the pros really getting through their approach quickly, but I think the average joe should think of it more as a "walk-up". Slowing down the approach, for me, is the best way of slowing everything else down, which in turn smooths it all out and results in more distance.
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  #24  
Old 10-04-2013, 01:32 PM
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A rod A rod is offline
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The run up/ x step is to help impart more forward momentum on the disc. It also to get your body in the right positions to do that.

Arm strength as a term needs to go away bc its misleading.

Arm speed comes from proper hip timing, not throwing your arm as fast as you can. Thats asking for injury and max distance below 350'.
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