#51  
Old 05-15-2013, 09:37 AM
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New013 New013 is offline
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It's relative, just like stability.
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  #52  
Old 05-15-2013, 10:57 AM
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Teebird Elvis Teebird Elvis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whentherainscome View Post
Yeah man, no reason to carry everything. You got 10 molds in your sig, that's not, you know, exactly minimalism.
The Wizard and the Ion are shaped the same.
The Element, Scout, and Karma are exactly the same diameter and feel.

In those 5 discs I really only have 2 different molds.

I do not say that to argue, but to suggest those discs, especially the Gateway mids, it is like having one disc that is US, stable, and OS.
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  #53  
Old 05-15-2013, 02:20 PM
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whentherainscome whentherainscome is offline
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Getting a bit OT, but that's cool. The Ion and Wiz are real close on the outside profile, but way different when you grip them. The curve from the rim to the plate give it a completely different feel from the Wizard.

I have similar synergies in my bag. Rivers and FDs both have a lightly slanted rim at 1.8cm. OLFs and Firebirds have the exact same rim, and I could mix PDs in as well if I wanted. Viking and SW feel the same to me So all those drivers come out to 3 changes in handfeel and a wide variety of flights/stabilities.
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  #54  
Old 05-15-2013, 02:40 PM
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Toro71 Toro71 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New013 View Post
It's relative, just like stability.
This, I think.

For me, a control driver is any driver that the player can control a line for the majority of the flight. Not to HS turny, not to LS dumpy.
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  #55  
Old 05-15-2013, 02:52 PM
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Toro71 Toro71 is offline
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*too....too
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  #56  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:18 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crd 81 View Post
I consider speed 9 (rim width measurement on PDGA) to be in the realm of a control driver, what about a speed 10? Regardless, I think it is faster than a fairway and slower than a distance driver. I think there is a need for them sense courses are getting bigger.

What are you all's thoughts?
I think there's a bit of a problem with how this question is asked, and that's not a shot at the OP, it's a common issue with disc golf discussions.

There are two ways to talk about discs, from the players perspective and from the physical makeup of the disc.

From the player's perspective discs will act differently depending on who's throwing them. We all have different defects in our throw, preferred release angles and lines and power levels. When we talk about discs from this perspective we're generally talking about "slots" in our bag. A "control" driver is one we'll throw when we want good distance but also a decent level of control. Because we're all different, we may use wildly different discs for this slot.

From the physical makeup perspective it makes the most sense to categorize discs that all act similarly to one another. This is what flight charts do. When we talk about discs it's convenient to have categories of discs to talk about. Nothing about the player will change the physical makeup of the disc, so how these categories are made will be player independent.

The problem is that we use the same terms for both perspectives. Someone could choose a Boss as their putter and if they always use it for putting it is their putter. However, you wouldn't say that a Boss is a putter.

With all that in mind, it seems like on this forum the term "control driver" from an equipment standpoint is a relatively easy to control, speed 9-10 disc. Speed 6-8 are "fairway" drivers and 11+ are "distance" drivers. From the player's, bag building, standpoint I'll refer to this:

http://www.discgolfreview.com/resour...coverlap.shtml
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  #57  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:56 PM
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Flip Hyzerman Flip Hyzerman is offline
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A driver designed (and thrown) primarily for control instead of max distance. The PD is an excellent example IMO.
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