#11  
Old 07-02-2013, 11:07 AM
Spinthrift Spinthrift is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 331
Quote:
Originally Posted by bnbanbury View Post
There's lots of aspects to learn and your biggest ally is going to be patience.
I agree with Ben. Newcomers want to be better now. I did. Give yourself a year of being patient. Your learning curve will be a lot shorter, and more enjoyable, if you practice more than you play.

The worst place to learn to throw is on the course. You feel the pressure to perform on every shot, judging yourself with each throw. So you focus on your many failures rather than your few successes.

As soon as you can afford it, get a set of five or ten of the same DX midrange, one you're comfortable with. Find a field and throw to a near target, then a little farther away, etc. Throw a set of straight shots, then hyzers and anhyzers. Throw against the wind and with the wind. Concentrate more on clean release than accuracy, which will come.

You will see improvement much more quickly than slinging shots down the fairway and muttering to yourself while looking for your wayward disc.
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  #12  
Old 07-02-2013, 01:16 PM
depster depster is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: St. Louis, MO
Years Playing: 7
Courses Played: 31
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 259
Just get the innova DX starter pack and you'll be good as far as disc selection. Then go to an open field and huk until you get consistency hitting or landing near a target of your choosing on a straight line. Then move to hyzers, then to anhyzers. From anhyzers you can go to learning rollers but you don't really need to at this point. I'd also get like a banshee but strictly for ridiculous head winds and thumber/tomahawks. I live about 35-40 min south of Louisville. I'll send you a txt so you have my number incase you ever venture this way for a day.
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  #13  
Old 07-02-2013, 02:44 PM
JDalhoff JDalhoff is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Lanesville
Years Playing: 1
Courses Played: 2
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 8
Thanks everyone for the encouragement and insight on the sport, I actually already have 15 disk and have quickly figured out the ones I'm good with and not so good with, I'm good with my prodigy driver and good with my money putter but I can't quiet find a midrange suitable for me. I usually just go to my local course and practice at the two practice holes. But I know it will take time, I just can't get the form and release down at all, and everything goes right. I'm getting ready to buy a banshee disk and excited for that because I practiced threw one and did fairly decent at first I concentrated on power because in highschool in track when I threw disc and shot out I just did power because I had no form haha but now I'm concentrating on form and release and it's just not working and no distance at all, it's like taking 50 yards at a time haha
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  #14  
Old 07-02-2013, 09:28 PM
Almost_Gets Almost_Gets is offline
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Join Date: May 2013
Location: Batavia, IL
Years Playing: 1
Courses Played: 8
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 16
Putter and what i've learned.

I've been playing for only a short time. Here are my thoughts and a collection of what's been told to me:

Play the hole from the target backwards, not from the tee box forward.

"If you really want to get good, play with only your putter for several rounds." -@bigmanbailye (on dgcr)

Learn your discs and what they do. Fewer discs with more shots is going to be easier to remember than many discs and not remembering them. Know your favorites and use them. Currently I am using about 3-4 discs per round.

Talk to people at the courses.

Read these forums.

Watch the videos of the pros. Don't try to replicate what they are doing, until you understand why they are doing it. And not everything they do will work for you.

Ask questions.

Understand what each disc does and what shots you can make with that disc, and what shots you can't.

IMHO, you're not trying if youre not making mistakes, especially as a beginner. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. I can't tell you how many times people have said to me, "you threw what?!"

Get a target for use at home if you can.

Stop if you're not having fun and enjoy the moment you are in.


I don't know if this is helpful, but this is the little that I've gathered thus far. I hope it helps.
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  #15  
Old 07-02-2013, 10:44 PM
knettles's Avatar
knettles knettles is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Charleston, WV
Years Playing: 4.9
Courses Played: 56
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spinthrift View Post
I agree with Ben. Newcomers want to be better now. I did. Give yourself a year of being patient. Your learning curve will be a lot shorter, and more enjoyable, if you practice more than you play.

The worst place to learn to throw is on the course
. You feel the pressure to perform on every shot, judging yourself with each throw. So you focus on your many failures rather than your few successes.

As soon as you can afford it, get a set of five or ten of the same DX midrange, one you're comfortable with. Find a field and throw to a near target, then a little farther away, etc. Throw a set of straight shots, then hyzers and anhyzers. Throw against the wind and with the wind. Concentrate more on clean release than accuracy, which will come.

You will see improvement much more quickly than slinging shots down the fairway and muttering to yourself while looking for your wayward disc.
These are not necessarily true. You will improve alot faster playing a course with people that can give you good advice rather than throwing by yourself in a field. Throwing by yourself in a field when you don't know what you're doing is basically just practicing the wrong thing. If you can get some field practice in with a friend, great. I would also recommend sticking to some of the easier courses in the area for a while.

As far as the clubs go, I don't think there's a single person in my club that is bothered by the "noobs" in the group. For the most part, we're excited to see new people playing the sport. Also, remember to ask for advice. Many of us don't just give out advice because we don't want to sound bossy or condescending. But if you ask, we'll gladly help.

So, moral is, wherever you play, try to play with people that are better than you so you can learn from them.
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