#31  
Old 09-09-2013, 05:13 PM
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I still fear all rubber teepads when it get wet. Nothing like sprained/broken ankles.
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  #32  
Old 09-09-2013, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by horsmanm View Post
I still fear all rubber teepads when it get wet. Nothing like sprained/broken ankles.
This kind of material is way different than the non-porous stuff you get with fly pads or horse stall mats, those are awful with any moisture or sand on them. This stuff is used on playgrounds, and is really grippy still when wet.
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  #33  
Old 09-09-2013, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
This kind of material is way different than the non-porous stuff you get with fly pads or horse stall mats, those are awful with any moisture or sand on them. This stuff is used on playgrounds, and is really grippy still when wet.
Then I would love to check this stuff out. I might have to take a look at this stuff them next time Im drunk and decide to play the floor is lava at a playground.
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  #34  
Old 09-10-2013, 08:38 AM
jdawg24 jdawg24 is offline
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This material is very grippy when wet, even with mud on your shoes. It's similar to the playground material, but is a lot harder. The difference is that the playground material is applied in a thicker layer on top of a softer surface to cushion impacts of falling; this is setup on a compacted surface in a thin layer with more binder, so its much more dense and doesn't have as much give to it.
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  #35  
Old 09-10-2013, 06:39 PM
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The whole story if you have some time to read... Perkerson Mikrocopter Footage too, scroll down!!!

http://perkersondiscgolf.com/
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  #36  
Old 08-02-2016, 10:44 AM
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Hey there! So I'm involved with a new opportunity for a course and actually the park manager brought up potentially using this material for the tee pads as well as a 4' ring around each basket.

Any comments on durability now that these pads have been in place for 3+ years?
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  #37  
Old 08-02-2016, 12:10 PM
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After looking at pics and reading the reviews for Perkerson Park, I don't see anything negative about the tee pad wear and tear..

My main concern would be damage from shoveling snow in the winter.

The foot grip seems to be good in the wet weather based on posts on this thread.

Lower impact as well, so overall I'm thinking this is a good call and frankly I'm surprised more courses aren't looking at this material. I'll post when I have more details on costs..
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  #38  
Old 08-02-2016, 05:11 PM
jdawg24 jdawg24 is offline
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After 3 years, the pads that were poured when it was hot and have proper sitework are holding up well. Some of the pads were poured in the winter due to a stream variance process and those have not held up well at all -- they started to fail within a month of being poured -- we're trying to get the company to fix them. The rubber cures quickly when its hot, but very slowly in cold and its tough to keep people off for days on end.

They are much more maintenance than concrete. The pads have a drainage system through the rocks that can get clogged up by silt from dirt or decomposed leaves on the pad. We purchased a backpack blower and try to keep them clean, and to keep water off as it clogs up the pads and makes them muddy.

We used a separate company to do the site prep for teepads than the rubber company, because they had issues with flat. That company did some questionable work in spots where some of the underlying gravel wasn't packed down properly, or eroded out below supports, which has caused sags.

Playability is great. I've seen people posting about them being slick when wet, but i would disagree on that. They will even drain off mud that gets tracked on them. Very easy on your joints and grippy.

So I'd say that if you had A+ site work and design of the teepads (no drainage issues), maintenance would consist of keeping leaves off the teepads and they would hold up well. But if you have any issues in the install (weather, spots not tamped well, erosion / drainage onto pads) then they are pain to maintain.

We only installed these because we were forced to and would have installed concrete (for cost, durability and ease of maintenance). That view hasn't changed.
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  #39  
Old 08-02-2016, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdawg24 View Post
Photos (more here):

]
These look absolutely traction-riffic, and I hope to come across some in the future.
I could swear, though, that that looks like crawfish shells on the pad. Is that part of the rubber, or...?
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  #40  
Old 08-03-2016, 10:39 PM
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Thank you so much jdawg! Feedback is invaluable.

I'm still in favor of concrete but our park manager likes this stuff and he is worried how concrete will "integrate" with the look of the park.

What worries me is that this course can flood in the spring so we need to be very careful about placement. Good to know the prepwork needs to be flawless.

I also wonder how these would work in the winter.
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