#11  
Old 07-17-2013, 03:37 PM
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Daubers Daubers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuajames View Post
Sharp is probably an accurate description...it subsides as soon as I drop my arm. There is no pain if my arm is at my side or during the RHBH throwing motion.
def get to the doc to make sure but sounds like a bursitis. The bursa sack acts as a cushion between joints, and if you inflame it it will press between the deltoid head and get pinched on overhead movements. This is why overhead presses or incline benching probably kills it. VERY common weightlifting issue. For a bit of background, I went to school for kinesiology and was a personal trainer, and have battled this myself for years ( again, get a real dr's opinion over random internet guy ).

Disc makes mine react the same way. IF it is bursitis you just have to get the inflammation down and it will slowly go away ( until agitated again). Terribly annoying but you learn what movements to avoid.
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  #12  
Old 07-17-2013, 04:30 PM
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joshuajames joshuajames is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daubers View Post
def get to the doc to make sure but sounds like a bursitis. The bursa sack acts as a cushion between joints, and if you inflame it it will press between the deltoid head and get pinched on overhead movements. This is why overhead presses or incline benching probably kills it. VERY common weightlifting issue. For a bit of background, I went to school for kinesiology and was a personal trainer, and have battled this myself for years ( again, get a real dr's opinion over random internet guy ).

Disc makes mine react the same way. IF it is bursitis you just have to get the inflammation down and it will slowly go away ( until agitated again). Terribly annoying but you learn what movements to avoid.
This sounds exactly like what I have going on.

I'll look into the doctor's opinion.

It's been a long battle for about 18 years of off and on issues with it.
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  #13  
Old 07-17-2013, 04:51 PM
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justactnormal justactnormal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daubers View Post
def get to the doc to make sure but sounds like a bursitis. The bursa sack acts as a cushion between joints, and if you inflame it it will press between the deltoid head and get pinched on overhead movements. This is why overhead presses or incline benching probably kills it. VERY common weightlifting issue. For a bit of background, I went to school for kinesiology and was a personal trainer, and have battled this myself for years ( again, get a real dr's opinion over random internet guy ).

Disc makes mine react the same way. IF it is bursitis you just have to get the inflammation down and it will slowly go away ( until agitated again). Terribly annoying but you learn what movements to avoid.
This is true. I've had trouble with both my shoulders and have dislocated them both multiple times tearing up a lot of stuff along the way. My right one (I'm a righty) was originally hurt while playing ultimate in college, diving for it and landing stiff arm on the ground. It popped out of the rear of the joint, which structurally is worse than coming out of the front, and I've never been the same, even after surgery.

You definitely want to take it easy and probably should consult an orthopedist, especially if it doesn't get better. Even though it seems like a natural motion, don't underestimate the amount of torque that throwing forehand puts on your elbow and shoulder. It's hella tough and don't even think about throwing anything overhand until you know you're good to go.

It's not unusual that throwing backhand wouldn't hurt, either. Pulling through and across your body is much easier on the shoulder than pushing hard away from your body, which is what a forehand is. Adduction v/s abduction and all. Just to illustrate it, you can stand in a doorway with your elbow close to your body and push against the frame with your arm bent away from you. You'll feel the stress on the inside of your elbow and front of the shoulder. That's what a forehand throw does and where it stresses your body. It can be tough, b/c that's where all the torque from a forehand is concentrated, even if your form is perfect and smooth. Add in anything off axis, or strongarming a throw, and it's easy to imagine how tough that is on those two joints.
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  #14  
Old 07-20-2013, 10:36 PM
discgolfer25 discgolfer25 is offline
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I am a college baseball pitcher and disc golfer. I also had a similar experience while disc golfing. I could only throw the disc soft without any pain, anytime I would crank it up, it would hurt. It was a sharp pain and would only happen when throwing a disc or baseball hard. I got it checked out and it was a torn labrum. I am currently one week post op and have to wait over a year to play either sport again. One thing about the labrum is that it's not constant pain, sometimes it hurts other times it feels okay.
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