#101  
Old 11-16-2013, 03:34 PM
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Ripper Ripper is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampstead View Post
This has to be a troll post, right? I mean, is anybody seriously this misguided about life? Like, it's impossible to have multiple hobbies, passions, pursuits while simultaneously working on mind, body and spirit? What a completely odd thing to spew all over a disc golf forum.
I know a bunch of people like he described. Its pretty normal in comoetitive disc golf circles.
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  #102  
Old 11-16-2013, 05:07 PM
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turbine712 turbine712 is offline
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Originally Posted by BigSky View Post
When you realize you'll never be the greatest, a lot of pressure is taken off, and you can enjoy it more.

Besides, how can you quit? The flight of a well thrown disc as it curves through the air is one of the most beautiful sights in all of sports. I could never give that up.
This right here sums it up for me to a tee. With all of the orthopedic surgeries (17) I have had, the flight of the disc is magical for me.
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  #103  
Old 11-18-2013, 02:59 PM
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Deuces Deuces is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtreadwell View Post
You are clearly on the wrong site my friend. Family, friends, travel, religion, and growth can all happen on the disc golf course after all.
I don't see any of that going on during any sort of real competitive play. Competition really brings out the worst in some people. Between all of the cheating, lying, arguing, and poor sportsmanship that I've witnessed in nearly 7 years of competitive play, I'm really not sure why it took me this long to move on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal View Post
Hate to rain on your parade, buddy, but some folks I know can maintain a 980+ rating in their sleep. No unbalanced lifestyle necessary.
I don't know of anyone that has any sort of real career plus a family that meets this criteria. What I have instead witnessed is great players being pulled away from the game by the everyday demands and responsibilities of real life. If you don't think that having those sort of things directly affects your ability to play, then I suggest you go do 2 hours doing laps in the pool. One by yourself, and the second with a baby in one hand and your boss on a cellphone in the other to get some idea of the difference these things can make on your performance. You will try to keep up and for a while you might, but eventually, you will fall behind... considerably.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampstead View Post
This has to be a troll post, right? I mean, is anybody seriously this misguided about life? Like, it's impossible to have multiple hobbies, passions, pursuits while simultaneously working on mind, body and spirit? What a completely odd thing to spew all over a disc golf forum.
What I said is that if you have a balanced life, you are distinctly disadvantaged against those that choose instead to specialize in just one thing. It is very difficult to throw down $50 time and again essentially betting on yourself at tournaments against competition that has 3 times the amount of free time to practice than you do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ripper View Post
I know a bunch of people like he described. Its pretty normal in competitive disc golf circles.
Yep. It's what I've seen, so it is my viewpoint that I chose to share.
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  #104  
Old 11-18-2013, 03:24 PM
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ru4por ru4por is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deuces View Post
I don't see any of that going on during any sort of real competitive play. Competition really brings out the worst in some people. Between all of the cheating, lying, arguing, and poor sportsmanship that I've witnessed in nearly 7 years of competitive play, I'm really not sure why it took me this long to move on.



I don't know of anyone that has any sort of real career plus a family that meets this criteria. What I have instead witnessed is great players being pulled away from the game by the everyday demands and responsibilities of real life. If you don't think that having those sort of things directly affects your ability to play, then I suggest you go do 2 hours doing laps in the pool. One by yourself, and the second with a baby in one hand and your boss on a cellphone in the other to get some idea of the difference these things can make on your performance. You will try to keep up and for a while you might, but eventually, you will fall behind... considerably.



What I said is that if you have a balanced life, you are distinctly disadvantaged against those that choose instead to specialize in just one thing. It is very difficult to throw down $50 time and again essentially betting on yourself at tournaments against competition that has 3 times the amount of free time to practice than you do.



Yep. It's what I've seen, so it is my viewpoint that I chose to share.
I get it Dueces. I don't play competetively, don't spend much time on the practice field, and usually only get a couple rounds per week in. But, honestly, I find your take a little self absorbed. You assume that family, friends, religion.... are the paths to self actualization. Well, for you, that can be true. Really is it about what make you happy. I don't expect anyone here should tell you that disc golf should be all important, anymore than I would expect you to tell anyone that your other pursuits are more important than theirs. Sounds like you have the best of many worlds, you should count your blessings.
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  #105  
Old 11-18-2013, 05:10 PM
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Norcal Norcal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deuces View Post
I
I don't know of anyone that has any sort of real career plus a family that meets this criteria.
I know many top ams and many open players who are nothing more than weekend warriors. They have families, careers, and full, well-balanced lives, and yet they have no problem remaining competitive disc golfers. These types of players are the norm in this area, not the exception.

Your rant struck me as sour grapes. The fact that someone's better than you at disc golf does not mean that they devote an inordinate amount of time to the game.
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  #106  
Old 11-18-2013, 05:34 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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I find it odd at how many people are having such a negative reaction towards Deuces' observations. He's not advocating quitting, he's saying that he's observed people either quitting or severely cutting back for the reasons he's given. I've seen it (and done it myself) in several different activities for many different reasons. I have a lot less time to myself as a married father of two than I did when I was a single guy. There isn't any more time in the day so I can't possibly do everything I did back then with my current responsibilities (quite frankly, I don't want to do all the same things, either), so am I a trolling, whiny quitter because I didn't change the fabric of space-time to accommodate all of my hobbies while raising two kids and hitting my stride in my career?

I don't doubt that some people prioritize certain hobbies (in this case disc golf) to a high enough extent to still be able to make time to play competitively from time to time, but saying that if you don't do that then you're trolling or whining is absurd. Some people managed to achieve a greater skill level and are able to maintain it with less practice, and my guess is that Deuces would lump those people in with the people who can still play a lot.
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  #107  
Old 11-18-2013, 05:36 PM
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bpierce08 bpierce08 is online now
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Every time I have a bad day I say I'm done and I'm quitting. Than the next day I'm out there throwing plastic. I'll be playing until I can't.
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  #108  
Old 11-18-2013, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal View Post
I know many top ams and many open players who are nothing more than weekend warriors. They have families, careers, and full, well-balanced lives, and yet they have no problem remaining competitive disc golfers. These types of players are the norm in this area, not the exception.

Your rant struck me as sour grapes. The fact that someone's better than you at disc golf does not mean that they devote an inordinate amount of time to the game.
They certainly aren't making a living in Northern California on DG tournament winnings and sponsorships. So they must have day jobs, or money in the bank/trust funds. For instance, I think I've heard Nate Doss's family is well off, and certainly Peter McBride has the money.

But I'm sure it is frustrating to Deuces that he is competing against young guys with tons of time on their hands, that can focus most of their time and effort on DG.

It is important to know that family, friends, work, life should come before DG. Maybe you can mix the two, if you are lucky. I like how the Rico family has the Legacy business.
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  #109  
Old 11-18-2013, 06:37 PM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garublador View Post
I find it odd at how many people are having such a negative reaction towards Deuces' observations. He's not advocating quitting, he's saying that he's observed people either quitting or severely cutting back for the reasons he's given. I've seen it (and done it myself) in several different activities for many different reasons. I have a lot less time to myself as a married father of two than I did when I was a single guy. There isn't any more time in the day so I can't possibly do everything I did back then with my current responsibilities (quite frankly, I don't want to do all the same things, either), so am I a trolling, whiny quitter because I didn't change the fabric of space-time to accommodate all of my hobbies while raising two kids and hitting my stride in my career?

I don't doubt that some people prioritize certain hobbies (in this case disc golf) to a high enough extent to still be able to make time to play competitively from time to time, but saying that if you don't do that then you're trolling or whining is absurd. Some people managed to achieve a greater skill level and are able to maintain it with less practice, and my guess is that Deuces would lump those people in with the people who can still play a lot.
I don't think the "negative reaction" was about Deuces whining that he can't commit enough time to be competitive. It was his categorizing those who do as having an "unbalanced life" and making poor decisions about what's important in their lives, because they're perhaps missing out on things that he values.
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  #110  
Old 11-18-2013, 07:00 PM
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wake_rider wake_rider is offline
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I've had such a bad game recently, that I've been awfully close to walking off the course and being done with it all. I think it will take me a completely laughable round (similar to one I had yesterday) to remember that this is all for fun. I'm a reasonably good player and have the ability to shoot well in the negatives, but it seems like as of recent that has become the exception.

It all starts with putting for me. When I putt well, my game gets hot and I'll shoot with the local pros. When it's off, my game falls apart and I'll consistently shoot around 10 over on the more difficult local courses. That drives me nuts. To hit positive double digits makes me so freaking frustrated that I have come close to quietly dropping my bag off in the pond and walking away.

Knowing that the problem is my putting, I should just work on that, right? Well, there is the problem. The little time that I have for disc right now, I try to get out on the course. I'm a grad student who also works full-time hours at my job aside of my university obligations, and I'm a father/husband. When I have spare time at the end of my day, it's spent with my wife and daughter. When I have spare time on the weekend, it is spent either hanging out with them, or trying to sneak in a quick round. Oddly, those fast rounds I usually shoot pretty solid and right around par or better. However, now whenever I have a bit more time and I play a mini or with a friend or two and the round slows down, I shoot like an absolute turd and get beat by guys that have never been in my range. It's almost infuriating.

I don't really know how to change this mental break down as of now, but it has me teetering on the verge of being done with it until either winter break or next summer. It's sad because I still enjoy playing, at least when I shoot reasonably, but those fall-apart rounds are coming more and more often and my frustration levels are building; it might be best to hang them up for a bit and hit the restart button a few months from now.
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