#71  
Old 08-27-2014, 12:36 AM
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This is a one man show. I don't have a gas powered mixer, I don't have a concrete saw,I don't like spending money on over-kill.
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  #72  
Old 08-27-2014, 12:40 AM
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I'm pretty sure Mike wasn't saying to pour multiple times, but rather to divide the 5x10. If I pour a 4' sidewalk, 100' long...I am going to pour that whole sucker at one time. Once its floated and starting to set up, I'll come back and start cutting joints every 4-6', which ever length looks the best. No one will make it in multiple pours. It will make it weaker and way more time consuming.
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Old 08-27-2014, 12:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallpaul View Post
...that's like 40 minutes away...
Not far enough...I was born a poor black child.
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  #74  
Old 08-27-2014, 12:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mando View Post
This is a one man show. I don't have a gas powered mixer, I don't have a concrete saw,I don't like spending money on over-kill.
You really do need a helper. I could handle this solo easily, but then I have done millions of SF like this.

I don't have a gas mixer either.....I'd be doing it by wheelbarrow as I will be doing in a few days when I pour the column bases. Nothing wrong with that.

You don't need a concrete saw. A skil saw with a concrete/masonry blade, either abrasive or diamond will do just fine. You just run it along a 2x4 for a straight edge and cut it 1/2"-3/4' deep.

If you don't want to do that with the skil saw, buy a cheap 1/4" jointer and use it to cut the joints when its wet and finish accordingly. That would be the easiest way to do it. You just need that weakened spot on the concrete....it will crack there. Look at the joints in the sidewalks.....every one of them will have a crack at the bottom. Its why they are there. ( To do this would mean you make it a single pour and mix it fairly wet to give you enough time to work it. The added Portland will help with strength loss.)
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Old 08-27-2014, 12:53 AM
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Jointer...or groover.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Marshallt...3-HD/202091764
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Old 08-27-2014, 12:57 AM
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This is the broom I was referring to earlier.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Marshallt...0-HD/100318059

Most rental companies and even Home Depot and Lowes will rent basic concrete tools if you don't want to buy them.
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bultx1215 View Post
You really do need a helper. I could handle this solo easily, but then I have done millions of SF like this.

I don't have a gas mixer either.....I'd be doing it by wheelbarrow as I will be doing in a few days when I pour the column bases. Nothing wrong with that.

You don't need a concrete saw. A skil saw with a concrete/masonry blade, either abrasive or diamond will do just fine. You just run it along a 2x4 for a straight edge and cut it 1/2"-3/4' deep.

If you don't want to do that with the skil saw, buy a cheap 1/4" jointer and use it to cut the joints when its wet and finish accordingly. That would be the easiest way to do it. You just need that weakened spot on the concrete....it will crack there. Look at the joints in the sidewalks.....every one of them will have a crack at the bottom. Its why they are there. ( To do this would mean you make it a single pour and mix it fairly wet to give you enough time to work it. The added Portland will help with strength loss.)
So ,I can't do two pours with a gap in the middle?
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bultx1215 View Post
I'm pretty sure Mike wasn't saying to pour multiple times, but rather to divide the 5x10. If I pour a 4' sidewalk, 100' long...I am going to pour that whole sucker at one time. Once its floated and starting to set up, I'll come back and start cutting joints every 4-6', which ever length looks the best. No one will make it in multiple pours. It will make it weaker and way more time consuming.
Why would it be weaker with multiple pours ?
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  #79  
Old 08-27-2014, 01:32 AM
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Yes, you can do it in two pours. Not ideal by any means, but possible. It will involve setting a center form and finishing up to that.....once its finished, pull said center form with EXTREME care and pour other side. To do it that way in the same day is a lot more difficult since you have to be able to read how its setting up as to whether or not you can pull the form. You will need to edge that form for sure, or the surface will spall out when the form is removed. The resulting cold joint is not a strong way to do it. You basically have two independent pieces joined by the mesh. Not what you want to have. You can put dowels across that joint to strengthen it...and if you do it this way, I'd highly recommend it. It will involve yet more cost.
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  #80  
Old 08-27-2014, 01:49 AM
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I would pour and finish it as one piece, no cuts, no lines, nada. Just do it. 99% of the tees I play on have zero control joints. None have broken up...all have cracks, but no failures. I think way too much is being made of the control joints and cracking. As long as the mesh is mid-plane, I'd go for it in one piece and let the mesh hold it all together. It will be nice and simple that way.
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