#1  
Old 03-20-2014, 02:09 PM
Timeetyo Timeetyo is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Albion, NY
Years Playing: 0.7
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Posts: 701
Where to start

I am just starting out this spring and am currently mostly doing fieldwork in the yard while I wait for the remainder of the snow to melt (if it ever does). I have done a ton of reading both here and the links to DGR so I have an idea of the things I need to be doing - but know that I am not able to work on all of the pieces at once. It seems like every time I watch a new video or read a new thread I pick up that piece of the puzzle but lose something I thought I had the time prior. Unfortunately I am currently video challenged, so I don't have a video to post up (which would be best). So for someone brand new - what are the 'big' pieces to work on first? I know it takes a lot of time and practice which I am willing to put in I just want to be sure I am working on the most important pieces first.

Current discs and normal distances:

Nova: 150-165
Shark: 160-190
Foxbat: 165-200
Leopard: 175-215
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  #2  
Old 03-20-2014, 02:50 PM
ambroze ambroze is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Smyrna, TN
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I'm going to relate my reply to when I first started out playing. Work on your mid shots and don't rush into trying to get max distance. There's a local course that I would stick to because it was wide open and most holes were 200-300ish. My main focus was to par everything. Even if that meant throwing 1/2 or so to the basket, taking my upshot and getting close for a putt. I tried to stay away from the harder level courses in town until I was ready (wish a lot more new players would do this). I found that this approach helped me out so much in my development. Doing that for a while I worked up to getting more distance and trying to bridge that gap between taking a par and trying to get those birdies. If you really want to be good IMO the 2 things I found are key are accuracy (not distance) and of course learning to putt from 20-25 ft. Hope this helps.
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  #3  
Old 03-27-2014, 11:41 PM
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JFibeZZZ JFibeZZZ is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
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Posts: 416
I agree 100% with the post above. You'll find there are a lot of courses out there that you are doing good to simply par every hole, even as a pro. Distance still plagues me, but in all honesty playing what few tourneys I have have helped me more than the dozens of rounds I have played at a local course. Not only do you get valuable experience, you also get paired with people who likely have more knowledge than you and are willing to help.
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  #4  
Old 03-28-2014, 05:13 AM
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teemkey teemkey is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tigard, OR
Courses Played: 36
Posts: 989
Field work:
1: master a flat release (no wobble, let the disc do the work)
2: master the hyzer and anhyzer release (make the disc do what you want it to)

Game:
1: Sink every 20' or less putt.
2: approach within 20' (if within 200')

Then accept your winner's prize with polite humility. It's all very simple, but might take a while
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  #5  
Old 03-28-2014, 01:02 PM
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KniceZ KniceZ is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: King George VA
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Agree with all the above - but you may also want to link up with a local club. Find the better players, ask them to play a few rounds with you and give pointers. They may see things in your form that need to be corrected just so they don't get too ingrained in your muscle memory. It will be easier to work on distance if you don't have completely change what you've been doing doing.
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  #6  
Old 03-28-2014, 01:13 PM
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Cadmanic Cadmanic is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Alexis, IL
Years Playing: 1.7
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Posts: 130
Everything said so far is spot-on. I think the biggest thing to help move me from a terrible chucker to a not-so-bad novice was getting my own basket to practice putting. Buy or build one if at all possible... Your scores will thank you.
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