#41  
Old 03-02-2014, 12:28 PM
Kodachrome's Avatar
Kodachrome Kodachrome is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: South St. Paul, MN
Years Playing: 2.5
Courses Played: 16
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 3,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by davetherocketguy View Post

I've also wondered, what prevents these holes in the ground from becoming filled with water? Seems like a 20" diameter hole after an entire summer is going to be filled with all sorts of nastiness.


-Dave
drainage rock, son. i don't know if that's what they use but that's what makes sense to me. i know the water table is higher down south than it is here, but i assume drainage rock would solve a lot of problems.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 03-02-2014, 01:02 PM
davetherocketguy's Avatar
davetherocketguy davetherocketguy is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Southwest Michigan
Years Playing: 10.1
Courses Played: 36
Throwing Style: RHFH
Posts: 847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodachrome View Post
drainage rock, son.
Well Dad, by drainage rock I assume you me an open graded aggregate meant for leaching the water away from the hole. That works great when you are in areas of moderately to well drained soils. I'm not saying these holes are impossible to build or they shouldn't put them in or anything like that. Just pointing out they look like something that if it isn't maintained it could be slightly annoying.

Also, Dad water tables can very shallow "up north" and very deep down south. It's all a matter of topography, soils, climate, etc. and not geographical location.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 03-02-2014, 01:30 PM
Kodachrome's Avatar
Kodachrome Kodachrome is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: South St. Paul, MN
Years Playing: 2.5
Courses Played: 16
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 3,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by davetherocketguy View Post
Well Dad, by drainage rock I assume you me an open graded aggregate meant for leaching the water away from the hole. That works great when you are in areas of moderately to well drained soils. I'm not saying these holes are impossible to build or they shouldn't put them in or anything like that. Just pointing out they look like something that if it isn't maintained it could be slightly annoying.
you are correct. "son" was not meant in a derogatory way, fyi. along the lines of "science, bitch" or "straight cash, homie". more exclamatory than anything.

i know you never said not to use it. and i agree it could be annoying, absolutely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davetherocketguy View Post
Also, Dad water tables can very shallow "up north" and very deep down south. It's all a matter of topography, soils, climate, etc. and not geographical location.
also correct. i generalized. when i was taking a class to become NCMA certified we focused a bit specifically on installation techniques more common in the south to combat saturation - obviously if you live in an area that has sandy soils, elevated, not near a lake/aquifer etc, you won't have to worry about it.

clearly drainage rock will not solve everything if you have a course on top of straight clay, but if you dig it deep enough it should help quite a bit.

i wish we had some courses up here ready to go when spring comes; i think it'd be a welcome break from DG.

Last edited by Kodachrome; 03-02-2014 at 01:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 03-03-2014, 09:53 AM
Lewis's Avatar
Lewis Lewis is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Marietta, GA
Years Playing: 7.2
Courses Played: 16
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 4,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarpfish View Post

You know, if you think about it, you could integrate a footgolf course with a disc golf course a whole lot easier, and I think the former would be a lot more fun with all those obstacles in the way.
I was thinking the same thing. It wouldn't be hard to add footgolf to a lot of disc golf courses around the country. Davetherocketguy has a good point about hilly courses not being well suited for footgolf, and I doubt you'd want to play footgolf next to a fast running creek (floating balls would be harder to fetch in that case than sinking discs), but there are plenty of courses that would work fine for adding footgolf. And I think the trees and other obstacles would do more to add to footgolf than roots and rocks would detract from it. As long as the greens aren't placed where the balls will roll away on their own, I figure footgolf could be installed in lots of disc golf courses. Probably better than on ball golf courses, and it would give municipal parks management people another reason to approve installation of new courses.

As long as soccer moms don't get all scary about their kids getting beaned by disc golf players on the course, footgolf should be an ally, not a rival. Etiquette will be important to establish early on, especially if the footgolfers play faster, and want to "play through" groups of disc golfers all day.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 03-03-2014, 10:33 AM
nolangherity nolangherity is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: MPLS
Posts: 1,719
im going to step in the hole, twist my ankle, and shut the whole thing down before it starts.
Reply With Quote
 

  #46  
Old 03-03-2014, 10:58 AM
Kenny53691's Avatar
Kenny53691 Kenny53691 is offline
Noodle Arm
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: West of Dayton, OH
Years Playing: 4.6
Courses Played: 64
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 1,732
Maybe I could use footgolf as a gateway drug to try to get her into disc golf again.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.