#31  
Old 02-13-2014, 02:07 AM
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jongoff09 jongoff09 is offline
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Originally Posted by cjrogus View Post
How often do you actually use the hole length when deciding what disc to throw? I don't think I've ever used a hole length to make me change my disc selection. I can tell where my discs are going to land and how far they will go so why should I use a length.
The only way I could see it helping is when the elevation is changing and there fore might play a little longer or shorter than it actually does but I've only seen a handful of signs that display that kind of info.
Like others have said, I use the distances at new courses. I know exactly how far my discs will fly when I make a good throw.

Quote:
Also, how should you measure the distance? Should it be absolute length or flight of the perfect shot. Should a hole that goes 300ft straight then dogleg 50ft right be 304ft(the length of the hypotenuse) or closer to 340(the length of the discs flight?
I prefer the hypotenuse, especially for par-3s. Par-4s and -5s may be a different story. I say that because, again, I know how far my discs travel linearly. I can't easily go to a field and measure how far my disc will go straight before making a turn and then measure how far it travels after turning. I know that on that route, my disc went X' from where I threw it.

Par-4s and -5s, I prefer distance markers to the basket. I have played a par-70 course and it had distance markers at I think 250', 300', and 350' on the longer holes that really helped.
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  #32  
Old 02-13-2014, 08:34 AM
JC17393 JC17393 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jongoff09 View Post
I prefer the hypotenuse, especially for par-3s. Par-4s and -5s may be a different story. I say that because, again, I know how far my discs travel linearly. I can't easily go to a field and measure how far my disc will go straight before making a turn and then measure how far it travels after turning. I know that on that route, my disc went X' from where I threw it.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but if a hole has a dog leg fairway and the distance listed is the "hypotenuse" distance, that's the straight line from tee to basket (i.e. through the trees/obstacles on the inside of the dog leg). How exactly is that helpful for being able to choose the right disc/line to navigate the dog leg? Your disc isn't traveling linearly in this situation like it would be in a field. If it says 304 straight line from tee to basket, but the shape of the fairway forces a disc to travel ~360 feet to negotiate the turn and reach the green, isn't throwing the disc you *know* goes ~300 feet going to leave you well short?

I suppose if you're good with doing the math to extrapolate the distance (the old a squared + b squared = c squared thing), you can do it. But should courses be expecting players to do that kind of math?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jongoff09 View Post
Par-4s and -5s, I prefer distance markers to the basket. I have played a par-70 course and it had distance markers at I think 250', 300', and 350' on the longer holes that really helped.
Definitely. One of the handiest things about the caddy books players get at the USDGC (a par-68) is that the hole maps identify landmarks on the fairways and their distance both from the tee and to the basket. It's the only thing I've encountered that approximates ball golf and their use of sprinkler heads and the like to give approximate distances to the green. It's especially helpful on holes where there is a water or some other OB carry. Having the distance to go allows players to make a more educated decision about whether they should go for a shot or lay it up.
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  #33  
Old 02-13-2014, 09:07 AM
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blackcatsmith blackcatsmith is offline
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Yeah judging distance(depth perception) is a technique like any other. I will say that some are inherently better at it than others. It is a weak spot for me and I struggle on approaches because of this. On drives off the tee I usually choose which category(putter, mid, driver) of disc to throw according to the posted hole length(plus other factors such as wind, elevation, windows, ceilings, etc…).
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  #34  
Old 02-13-2014, 09:09 AM
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blackcatsmith blackcatsmith is offline
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Also, I was told there would be no math in disc golf.
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  #35  
Old 02-13-2014, 10:12 AM
ambroze ambroze is offline
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Distance does matter. It can be the difference between the disc I use.

I'm sure that how to measure the exact distance of a hole will spark up a lot of conversation and I believe that's been discussed here before. I believe it's determined by the fairway set by the designer of the hole. I recently played Harmon Hills, TN and I tell you what there are some holes out there that do a huge horseshoe. If you draw a straight line from the tee pad to the basket some would be say 175 to 200 ft away but there's no path there at all unless you are willing to play it through the thick woods or do what the designer intended and that is to follow the fairway path. Following the intended path makes the hole say 375ft.
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  #36  
Old 02-13-2014, 11:52 AM
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Basshunter Basshunter is offline
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I'm going to essentially echo Brad Harris from one of the early posts in this thread. Playing courses I play regularly, I don't need the distance. I know the lines I want to hit (my ability to actually do so aside).

But playing new courses, I find it invaluable, especially if the basket is blind from the tee. I also appreciate a hole map indicating dog legs, etc. i'd generally rather not have to walk the hole first just to see what it does. I like the surprise of discovering that my throw left me better of than I thought. It happens every once in a while, I swear.
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  #37  
Old 02-13-2014, 12:24 PM
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ohtobediscing ohtobediscing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcatsmith View Post
Also, I was told there would be no math in disc golf.
"Math is hard!"---talking Barbie, 1990s edition
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  #38  
Old 02-13-2014, 12:46 PM
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jongoff09 jongoff09 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JC17393 View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong, but if a hole has a dog leg fairway and the distance listed is the "hypotenuse" distance, that's the straight line from tee to basket (i.e. through the trees/obstacles on the inside of the dog leg). How exactly is that helpful for being able to choose the right disc/line to navigate the dog leg? Your disc isn't traveling linearly in this situation like it would be in a field. If it says 304 straight line from tee to basket, but the shape of the fairway forces a disc to travel ~360 feet to negotiate the turn and reach the green, isn't throwing the disc you *know* goes ~300 feet going to leave you well short?
No, the disc I would throw would be one I know can travel that 300 linear feet on that route through the air.

For example, I know I can throw my teebird on a big hyzer and have it land 360' in front of me. How far did it travel if you followed its flight path? I have no idea. So if I step up to a hole that is 360 linear feet, but you have to go way right and fade hard to get to the basket, I know my teebird will make it. If the tee sign distance follows the fairway and says something like 420', that wouldn't help me any. I'd probably throw a Boss and end up way overshooting it.

There is a hole that goes over water at a course around here that is measured along the fairway because few people attempt to clear the water. The sign says I think 460, but it is really like 380 to go right at the basket. I watched Will Schusterick unknowingly clear that basket by some 75' because of what the sign says. It is a partially blind shot, so if it wasn't for some of us nearby he may have never found his disc.
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  #39  
Old 02-13-2014, 12:52 PM
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Grungedude42 Grungedude42 is offline
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Don't need them. Usually hit a tree first, anyway.
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  #40  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:12 PM
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RUSSELL RUSSELL is offline
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all the time. my depth perception is terrible.
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