#121  
Old 03-05-2014, 02:36 PM
Shamis Shamis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Dub View Post
No it is not.
Everyone knows what a ball golf course looks like, can't say that about Frisbee golf...What? Oh yeah, disc golf. Most people don't even know what it's called.
Hence my original point: you shouldn't put a dg course in a crowded park, and if you do, you better put up a lot of very descriptive signs.
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  #122  
Old 03-05-2014, 03:12 PM
JC17393 JC17393 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamis View Post
Hence my original point: you shouldn't put a dg course in a crowded park, and if you do, you better put up a lot of very descriptive signs.
I think stopping at the bolded is enough. Disc golf really isn't an activity suited for a shared public space. It really needs to be isolated as much as it can be from non-golfing users of a park.

Frankly, all the signage in the world does no good for the people who don't bother to read them. That goes for signs aimed at the non-golfers and golfers alike. The woman who was struck that sparked this thread wasn't wandering aimlessly through the park. A warning sign wouldn't really have changed her situation, since she was in the park for a specific purpose and in a part of the park specified for that purpose (and not for disc golf). From what I can tell, she didn't encroach on the disc golf course unwittingly and get struck by a disc thrown in the "fairway". The disc left the "fairway" and entered a space that was presumably safe from the disc golf course (assuming responsible design).

Also, there are apparently a few unsanctioned layouts of the course that undoubtedly strayed far from the original design. Any warning signs that might exist would presumably only cover the official layout. She could have been paying full attention to any signs on the course, intentionally chose a place to sit/stand where she was reasonable "safe" from the course, and still found herself in danger from some fools playing an unofficial, unmarked layout.

Signs, no matter how descriptive, aren't nearly enough.
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  #123  
Old 03-06-2014, 12:07 AM
gdub58 gdub58 is offline
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The city and the individual disc golfer who threw the disc are only marginally responsible for this situation - the majority of the blame is on the disc golf community at large - all of us here included.

We are so anxious to have more courses in our areas, will throw discs just about anywhere a basket is placed, and will often abuse the privilege when someone works hard to install a proper course.

Forget the analogies. Do we really think it was the city's idea to have this course, or did local disc golfers convince them to put it in? And was it new players who don't know any better who made the case, or was it likely an established, experienced group who wanted to have another course they could play, to pat themselves on the back and demonstrate that they are "growing the game"?

And what about courses like Flyboy and, more recently, the Blockhouse? These gems close because the disc golf community either acts irresponsibly themselves or are too laid back to police the idiotic behavior that causes courses to shut down and make the sport look bad.

It's time we started doing better - lobby for unsafe courses to be pulled, call people out for their inappropriate behavior in shared public spaces, and interact positively with people who don't have a clue and dare to get in our way.

This quote seems fitting: "A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury. - John Stuart Mill
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  #124  
Old 03-06-2014, 02:18 AM
Improbably Improbably is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdub58 View Post
The city and the individual disc golfer who threw the disc are only marginally responsible for this situation - the majority of the blame is on the disc golf community at large - all of us here included.
Agree with all but only quoting the beginning. Disc golf needs to transform as part of growth. High traffic multi-use areas simply are not good places for disc golf courses any more. I hate to say it but some courses should be pulled. This woman's misfortune is unfortunate, but disc golf communities perusing a growth strategy which creates more conflicts is a tragedy.
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  #125  
Old 03-06-2014, 06:27 AM
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davetherocketguy davetherocketguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdub58 View Post
The city and the individual disc golfer who threw the disc are only marginally responsible for this situation - the majority of the blame is on the disc golf community at large - all of us here included.
Hmmm...I disagree - a little bit. I just spent a bunch of time with my local muni and made a point of demonstrating that while disc golf is a great sport safety has to be a big consideration. I did that by handing everyone on the committee a disc and then asking them to tap their heads with the edge of the disc and then asked if they would like to be hit by a disc thrown by me as hard as I could. They laughed but my point was made.

I see what you are saying and you are not completely off base though. There probably needs to be more of a push for safe course design.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdub58 View Post
We are so anxious to have more courses in our areas, will throw discs just about anywhere a basket is placed, and will often abuse the privilege when someone works hard to install a proper course.

Forget the analogies. Do we really think it was the city's idea to have this course, or did local disc golfers convince them to put it in? And was it new players who don't know any better who made the case, or was it likely an established, experienced group who wanted to have another course they could play, to pat themselves on the back and demonstrate that they are "growing the game"?

And what about courses like Flyboy and, more recently, the Blockhouse? These gems close because the disc golf community either acts irresponsibly themselves or are too laid back to police the idiotic behavior that causes courses to shut down and make the sport look bad.

It's time we started doing better - lobby for unsafe courses to be pulled, call people out for their inappropriate behavior in shared public spaces, and interact positively with people who don't have a clue and dare to get in our way.
Yes yes yes...a thousand times YES.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdub58 View Post
This quote seems fitting: "A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury. - John Stuart Mill
eeeehhhh...not sure I completely agree with that lol. I think the key qualifier there is "may."
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  #126  
Old 03-06-2014, 07:37 AM
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KniceZ KniceZ is offline
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Come on - I'm surprised no no has mentioned the obvious group that's at fault and that can solve the problem.

It's the federal governments fault - they should force DG manufacturers to put warning labels on every disc warning that they are dangerous.

But back to the point - does anyone KNOW if the DGer was playing the Official course or one of the alternatives.
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  #127  
Old 03-06-2014, 07:47 AM
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KniceZ KniceZ is offline
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Oh I almost forgot - there needs to be federal safety regulations imposed on every course. Standoff distances, fencing, standard warning signs, federal regulations on disc shapes & weights, required training before you can play, and don't forget head gear.

Hyperbole - just for fun. But where does it end?
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  #128  
Old 03-06-2014, 07:58 AM
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nightmare nightmare is offline
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ive played on some courses that are insanely integrated on park property with patrons way to close to the play area. I've played others where it would be shocking to see anyone but golfers on the property.

I'd blame the golfer for now being more aware of his surroundings... just like if a kid hit a baseball into the woman, or someone letting their dog off the leash.
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  #129  
Old 03-06-2014, 08:33 AM
coupe coupe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davetherocketguy View Post
I did that by handing everyone on the committee a disc and then asking them to tap their heads with the edge of the disc and then asked if they would like to be hit by a disc thrown by me as hard as I could.
Years ago Craig Gangloff taught me a similar trick, that I've used whenever I do a clinic or a demonstration at a school/church/camp/kids club, etc., I pass out midranges and have kids tap the edge against the side of their head, and demonstrate what I want them to do (of course, I use an 86 Softie, so I can bang my noggin pretty vigorously, but they don't know that and I ain't tellin'.) Inevitably, it elicits surprised "OW!"s from a few showoff boys (it's always boys) who whack themselves too hard. The point having been made, I introduce Rule #1, Don't throw when there's someone in front of you, and 1A, Stay behind the person who's throwing.

That's all it takes for most kids to get it, but there's usually a few MS/HS boys and adults who need to get whacked a couple of times before they achieve enlightenment.
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  #130  
Old 03-06-2014, 08:35 AM
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chalos13 chalos13 is offline
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I've got to agree with gdub that disc golfers need to be more responsible and take better care of the courses they have, not be desperate to put in more on every park in town. When I tell people I'm playing disc golf this weekend, and then have to explain what it is, they typically say "is that what those weird metal things are for?" For the most part, the public doesn't know what DG is in my town, and with 6 disc golf courses around town, if they were going to learn they'd know already. Responsibility comes back to us. Blind shots always make me nervous because I don't know if anyone is going to be where I'm landing. Crowded parks I have to add about 30 minutes to an hour just for waiting on a tee box for people to move to a safe distance. We have to share the park. Those other people aren't just in our way, we're in theirs.
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