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  #11  
Old 03-10-2014, 05:10 PM
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HyzerUniBomber HyzerUniBomber is offline
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Almost done w/ Zen Golf which is a great read and an easy read.

I feel ya on the finding good guys to play with. I'm lucky in that my brother is really solid - and I play w/ my buddy Kyle (who is a dgcr poster) who is equally obsessive.

I think there's probably a difficulty in BEING a coach, which is miles away from being a solid player. Teaching somebody to fix mechanics, have worthwhile drills, etc - is also probably not very fun if you have limited time to play.

And then you throw in the reality that DG has a stigma about it not being cool to put effort into improving. When people hear that I throw field work 5 days a week on top of playing rounds, they think I'm absolutely insane. Honestly I don't care - I can laugh about it too, but then again I'm playing at a pretty solid level for somebody in the first year.

If your reality is that you're it in terms of finding a support network, then hopefully you can find some like minded players along the way that want to improve and support each other. Until, then - dgcr is here for ya!
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  #12  
Old 03-10-2014, 05:19 PM
PerpetualNewbie PerpetualNewbie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckless_pedestrian View Post
The thing that turned the corner for me (not all the way there yet, by any means) was Sidewinder on here saying heel up on the pivot foot.
Just so I'm clear, he was talking about during your x-step when he said this, and not the actual plant and drive/release, right?

I believe general consensus is that your plant foot should be flat on the ground and you pivot on your heel in order to generate power and reduce knee stress up through the actual release... if that's what you're saying then we're on the same page.
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  #13  
Old 03-14-2014, 01:34 PM
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luckless_pedestrian luckless_pedestrian is offline
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Hmmm... now you've got me rethinking it. Here's what he said:

Quote:
Well your shoulder turn in the backswing isn't that terrible, you aren't turning your hips back though. The second video you actually land on your front heel, so your hips are already open. You need to turn the hips back and land toes and roll to the heel which transfers your weight forward from behind you, so you can stop/brace/clear the front hip from continuing forward and leverage the shoulders/arm from it.
I took that to mean the I was landing directly on the heel of my last (pivot) foot. If I walk through it slowly, doing that opens the hips. If I concentrate on putting the toe down first, that keeps the hips closed and as the heel comes down with the weight transfer the hips open up. That little delay made a big difference to me. Or at least it seemed too.
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  #14  
Old 03-14-2014, 02:56 PM
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A rod A rod is offline
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This was the biggest part of transitioning standstill power to x step power. Lead with the plant heel keeps the hips closed. But the ball of the foot/big toe touches ground first.

I figured I'd post my findings because like you, finding it was easy with good focus and attention, but I would always lose it in a few hours to a week. I feel like I have simplified the process in my head enough not to lose it again. That was inspired by your thread, so thanks!
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  #15  
Old 03-14-2014, 02:57 PM
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Rob Martin Rob Martin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieMachine View Post
Basically you are talking about keeping the hips closed till your right foot hits and start to uncoil from the ground up pivoting on the heel?
For a RHBH player, can you explain this more? Hips closed part. X-step or running x-step
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  #16  
Old 03-14-2014, 03:19 PM
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BirdieMachine BirdieMachine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Martin View Post
For a RHBH player, can you explain this more? Hips closed part. X-step or running x-step
This is the last step (RHBH = right leg). You want the hips and shoulder facing away from the target, you initially land on the right toes and roll to the heel and then rotate on the heel. You rotate from the ground up creating a whip action or kinetic chain. Power from the foot transfers into the hip, then shoulders, then arm and finally wrist.

So you want to focus on sequencing that correctly. If you start with any part to early you cut off the power from the previous body action. This way you can create the maximum power into the throw.

So simply you are not moving any body part actively until you get a transfer from the lower part.

"Strong arming" comes from not having the sequence correct. Most of the power in that throw comes from the arm going to soon and out of sequence. I know I do this and thus have been working on getting the correct motion, just doing a single step throwing action indoors and focusing on that sequence. I've been doing this all winter so hopefully my body can learn this new movement and make it natural.

Last edited by BirdieMachine; 03-14-2014 at 03:23 PM.
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  #17  
Old 03-14-2014, 04:11 PM
PerpetualNewbie PerpetualNewbie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieMachine View Post
This is the last step (RHBH = right leg). You want the hips and shoulder facing away from the target, you initially land on the right toes and roll to the heel and then rotate on the heel. You rotate from the ground up creating a whip action or kinetic chain. Power from the foot transfers into the hip, then shoulders, then arm and finally wrist.

So you want to focus on sequencing that correctly. If you start with any part to early you cut off the power from the previous body action. This way you can create the maximum power into the throw.

So simply you are not moving any body part actively until you get a transfer from the lower part.
I've heard this described many times and watched tons of youtube footage for the last year, but unfortunately I was in a chicken-and-egg scenario - I didn't understand it until I felt it, and I couldn't figure out the timing/sequence to make myself feel it.

Luckily this time I was able to analyze things enough to figure out what the key was, and I am now able to have correct timing "at will", but I don't think I could try and teach it to someone else at this point.

Not every throw is magically perfect, I have other issues to work out and tighten up with my form, but the difference this has instantly made in my game is beyond huge.

I just got back from a course that I hadn't ever thought I would shoot below par on. Most of the pins were set in their long positions with several par 5's and several more par 4's. I threw -3 for the round, and it would have been -7 if I hadn't missed a few putts. Ridiculous!

Excited for tomorrow's tournament!
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  #18  
Old 03-14-2014, 04:27 PM
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BirdieMachine BirdieMachine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerpetualNewbie View Post
I've heard this described many times and watched tons of youtube footage for the last year, but unfortunately I was in a chicken-and-egg scenario - I didn't understand it until I felt it, and I couldn't figure out the timing/sequence to make myself feel it.

Luckily this time I was able to analyze things enough to figure out what the key was, and I am now able to have correct timing "at will", but I don't think I could try and teach it to someone else at this point.

Not every throw is magically perfect, I have other issues to work out and tighten up with my form, but the difference this has instantly made in my game is beyond huge.

I just got back from a course that I hadn't ever thought I would shoot below par on. Most of the pins were set in their long positions with several par 5's and several more par 4's. I threw -3 for the round, and it would have been -7 if I hadn't missed a few putts. Ridiculous!

Excited for tomorrow's tournament!
Awesome dude and you've only been playing a year!
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  #19  
Old 03-14-2014, 04:36 PM
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notroman notroman is offline
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Only word of advice I can offer after reading through all this is to keep up with practice and don't get discouraged when you suddenly lose distance. When I first started throwing far it felt great and effortless, but then went away. I scrambled to break apart my throw to find what I was doing different which was frustrating but then it came back again. Great. Then it went away. Then came back. Eventually it was more consistent and after about a year or so it finally stabilized out. This happened with almost everyone I know that "got it". Sounds like you may be going through the same phase.

The point is until you drill all this into muscle memory, it will come and go. You got over the hardest part - learning how to actually throw the throw. The only challenge in front of you now is to not let your confidence take a blow when the throw magically goes away as quickly as it appeared. That's normal. Don't try to force anything since the timing is so crucial it's almost impossible to make things happen "on purpose". You can't will it, you just have to relax and let your body do its thing. To get it the throw to be more consistent is all about repetition. If you lose it, then break it down to the very basics and build it up again. Sometimes it's easier to just take a break for a few days instead of getting frustrated.

Glad you picked it up so fast! Keep it up!
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  #20  
Old 03-14-2014, 04:59 PM
PerpetualNewbie PerpetualNewbie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieMachine View Post
Awesome dude and you've only been playing a year!
Yeah, but honestly, as much as I practice and play, I've probably packed like three years of playing time for a "normal" person in the 10 months I've been throwing...not really a fair apples-to-apples comparison. My goal is to be playing open by the middle of next season.
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