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Old 05-06-2014, 10:59 PM
Stover Stover is offline
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Tennis elbow Prevention

So this is a problem I have been dealing with for the last 3 years. I use to be able to throw forehands all day long. Now, if I throw 7-8 forehand drives (325-400) in a round I get tennis elbow. Pain in the outside muscles connecting your forearm to your elbow.

I have changed my game to avoid throwing more then 3-4 forearm drives a round (100-200 foot upshots don't seem to cause any problem). However, I am wondering if there is an easy remedy for this. I consider myself to be a pretty good forehand player and not using that shot limits my game.

The internet talks about bands, sleeves, exercises and form for this. But most of them are related to tennis or ball golf. Anyone have any experience with a good remedy/prevention for forehand shots in disc golf?
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  #2  
Old 05-06-2014, 11:09 PM
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brutalbrutus brutalbrutus is offline
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Somebody in the cincy area please help, lol. The guy who used to own The Nati proshop, Fred Salas, sells these elastic bands, that you can use to strengthen your arm muscles. It has a handle on one side that you hold in the hand like a disc and mimic BH and FH. I cant for the life of me think what its called. I also have an issue with tennis elbow. I use a 3lb weight and just do simple arm lifts at varying angles, and it seems to help by strengthening the muscles around the injury.

Last edited by brutalbrutus; 05-06-2014 at 11:12 PM.
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Old 05-06-2014, 11:16 PM
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brutalbrutus brutalbrutus is offline
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The Equalizer there is actually a thread on here about it.

http://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums...ead.php?t=3198

Last edited by brutalbrutus; 05-06-2014 at 11:19 PM.
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Old 05-07-2014, 01:35 AM
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tylerc tylerc is offline
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have you tried giving your forehand time to warm up? for instance throwing like 5 to 10 of the 150 foot upshots forehand before trying to drive?
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Old 05-07-2014, 01:56 AM
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wake_rider wake_rider is offline
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Being a lifelong tennis player, including 4 year D1 collegiate player, Tennis elbow is a bastard. Normally, muscle fatigue and pain is not really tennis elbow, rather there is swelling in the tendons. Once swelling occurs, the pain is really coming from repeated abrasion of that tendon over other connective areas that normally are out of the range of that tendon when it's at a normal size.

The best way to deal with it is prevention. By first strengthening the connective tissues through exercise (we normally used ropes on pulleys with weighted ends and did slow movements from all different angles, and combined that with stretch band exercises which plenty will show up on the internet to guide you along) is your initial priority. From there, plenty of stretching and warming up prior to playing is the next step. There is also a band that you can wrap across your forearm that helps relieve a bit of the shock transferred to those connective tissues, but they tend to be hit or miss on who they help. Those that benefit from them will swear to their usefulness, but I've never had any luck.

Finally, when you start to feel this being an issue... rice is about all you can do. Rest-ice-compression-elevation, combined with your preferred NSAID. Seriously. Rest it and get the swelling down. The problem with not doing so seems nothing greater than annoying, but real damage can occur when you keep pushing it. As the swelling makes the tendon larger, it rubs and rubs, eventually fraying at the locations where it is rubbing. That just makes the healing process all the longer and greatly frustrating.
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Old 05-07-2014, 02:07 AM
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sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
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Flex bar is great, ice, warming up, stretching, and physical therapy. I'd also highly recommend looking at your technique on video and make sure your elbow is bent during the throw and follow through and the palm/thumb doesn't finish pointed down at the ground.
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:59 AM
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dashiellx dashiellx is offline
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I found the streches found here: http://www.hughston.com/hha/a.seven.htm to be helpful.
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:04 AM
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bcr123psu bcr123psu is offline
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Work on strengthening your shoulder, specifically, the smaller muscles that might not get worked out regularly. You should be able to look up a PT routine for lateral epicondylitis and follow that. Basically, you want to rehab your arm.

In the short term, we a compression band around your forearm.
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:04 AM
burdphil burdphil is offline
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Learn to throw left handed. That's how I solved my shoulder/elbow problems. It took a few months, but it allowed me to keep playing.
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  #10  
Old 05-07-2014, 08:41 AM
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Tfire25 Tfire25 is offline
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I learned to throw left handed until my arm didn't hurt everyday. Mine was really bad though. I went to the dr and he said that I tore my tricep and had tennis elbow. He gave me 3 or 4 cortisone shots and made me sit out for 3 or 4 months.

I quit side arming and learned a nasty anny shot. But while I was rehabbing I played left handed. Left handed is terrible and I didn't ever get it down. It kept me on the course though.

I also wear a compression sleeve everytime I play now.
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