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  #11  
Old 04-01-2014, 11:07 AM
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BogeyNoMore BogeyNoMore is offline
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Zen and the Art of Disc Golf

I find that on approaches if I think about it, I'll probably screw it up (other than compensating for wind). However, I instinctively either do or don't take a step into my throw on approaches... I'd say that cutoff is probably around 125 ft... 'ish? Any closer, and I don't need any "help" reaching the basket -seems less moving parts makes for a more consistent and accurate delivery. Any farther, and it I need to "strong-arm" it to reach unless I step into my throw.

Even though I may have fewer moving parts when I stand and deliver, it seems the extra oomph I need to get there messes me up, but a nice smooth step when I throw nets better results. Either way, when I over think it, I'm toast. As Bruce Lee said, "Don't think. Feeeeeeel."


If you want to practice longer apraoches with your feet planted, try playing in deep snow or icy conditions.
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  #12  
Old 04-02-2014, 10:21 AM
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whentherainscome whentherainscome is offline
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I make more mistakes at the 150' range, I find it harder to gauge the power. I had to stop using my Aviar at that distance due to overthrowing. I know "when in doubt, hyzer" but I still throw the straight-and-fade shot whenever it's an option.

At >100' I usually do a jump putt form and lay up. This is the real reason I carry an Aviar with Wizards. The extra glide is very noticeable. I don't make putts with it, really. What it does do is allow me to keep my normal putting stance out to 60/70' and jumper stance out to 100' or so, allowing me to be squared up to the target with less chance to get off-line vs a backhand form. I also really like it on 220-250' holes.

Little 90%-wrist flicks (o/s putter/mid, even Firebird) are very reliable and are easier to execute from a standstill than BH.
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  #13  
Old 04-02-2014, 10:33 AM
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Stardoggy Stardoggy is offline
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Anything from 60' to about 200' (on approaches) is a standstill shot for me...living in the snow half the year means you have to learn one, and it's become an invaluable part of my game. It takes a bit to get good at, but once you get comfortable with the release angles and weight shift, I find it to be quite accurate.

I will add that I've started working on a step through putting motion for shots over 40'...if it works out, I'd like to be able to use it to 80ish' at some point.
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  #14  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:51 AM
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DiscinFiend DiscinFiend is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stardoggy View Post
Anything from 60' to about 200' (on approaches) is a standstill shot for me...living in the snow half the year means you have to learn one, and it's become an invaluable part of my game. It takes a bit to get good at, but once you get comfortable with the release angles and weight shift, I find it to be quite accurate.

I will add that I've started working on a step through putting motion for shots over 40'...if it works out, I'd like to be able to use it to 80ish' at some point.
Living in Wisconsin you need to have a good standstill throw. When throwing on ice & snow a run up isn't always a option. As Stardoggy said its been an invauable adition to my game. I throw from a standstill from about 100 - 250'. I agree with the others that said the less moving parts in your throw the better. Throwing from a standstill is harder to master than a short run up but better in the long run IMO.

From outside of the circle to around 100' I use a step through putt. I find I'm more consistent doing a step through putt than a jump putt. I see way to many people illegally jump putting. I know when I used to jump putt I didn't always do it properly. I'd rather not even have to deal with the possibility of being called out for illegally jump putting in tourneys. Step through putting has less moving parts than jump putting. It also allows me to keep my form closer to what it is inside the circle.

Stardoggy, you should definitely stick with the step through. Maybe its a WI thing but after jump putting for awhile in the winter I quickly switched to the step through. I even fell once when I landed on some ice doing a jump putt at Dretzkas winter course.
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  #15  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:57 AM
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kingjames1014 kingjames1014 is offline
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I have kind of a weird step-thru putt/approach that i use from 50-100 feet. outside that i standstill or one step approach.
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  #16  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:58 AM
Punk In Drublic Punk In Drublic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whentherainscome View Post
I make more mistakes at the 150' range, I find it harder to gauge the power. I had to stop using my Aviar at that distance due to overthrowing. I know "when in doubt, hyzer" but I still throw the straight-and-fade shot whenever it's an option.

At >100' I usually do a jump putt form and lay up. This is the real reason I carry an Aviar with Wizards. The extra glide is very noticeable. I don't make putts with it, really. What it does do is allow me to keep my normal putting stance out to 60/70' and jumper stance out to 100' or so, allowing me to be squared up to the target with less chance to get off-line vs a backhand form. I also really like it on 220-250' holes.

Little 90%-wrist flicks (o/s putter/mid, even Firebird) are very reliable and are easier to execute from a standstill than BH.




THIS.
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  #17  
Old 04-02-2014, 04:49 PM
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JFibeZZZ JFibeZZZ is offline
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I am not good at FH hand shots but I just couldn't bring mysel to even try them when putting, seems a lot less reliable.
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  #18  
Old 04-03-2014, 12:51 AM
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The Mad Cow The Mad Cow is offline
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i felt the same way until i was just goofing around one day and tried it.
i don't have a huge FH... but can control a 100-150' flick well enough that i'm going for birdie a LOT more often now and not trying to lay one up close and hope i don't blow the putt for par.
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  #19  
Old 04-13-2014, 06:45 AM
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QuinnAA199 QuinnAA199 is offline
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Learn to flick a gator. Anny and hyzer will save the day.
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  #20  
Old 04-13-2014, 08:08 AM
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joecoin joecoin is online now
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Watch McBeth and other pros. A lot of them have a rocking motion setup that ends up with their back foot pushing off the ground to help propel the disc forward. For me, this provides the best degree of accuracy.
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