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  #21  
Old 02-24-2010, 09:50 AM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billnchristy View Post
100' and 150' elevation changes?? Really?

This is a 40' manlift, are you telling me the elevation of a 200' long hole (5x the length of this boom) is 4x the height of this boom? They call that a cliff.
Yep, they're fun as heck to throw off of.

http://www.playdg.com/courses/?s=MN&c=bryantlake&h=11
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  #22  
Old 02-24-2010, 09:53 AM
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prerube prerube is offline
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Carousel Park in Deleware has a 75' elevation change on a 340' foot hole and it was steep. I lookes at the picture of 8, there is no way that is 150' foot elevation change unless there is a sheer drop off and a case of spiral stairs off in the distance. 150' on a 219' that would be nearly impossible to walk back up if you passed your disc.

Last edited by prerube; 02-24-2010 at 09:57 AM.
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  #23  
Old 02-24-2010, 10:14 AM
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toothyfish toothyfish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prerube View Post
Carousel Park in Deleware has a 75' elevation change on a 340' foot hole and it was steep. I lookes at the picture of 8, there is no way that is 150' foot elevation change unless there is a sheer drop off and a case of spiral stairs off in the distance. 150' on a 219' that would be nearly impossible to walk back up if you passed your disc.
Stairs, that would be a good idea. I've played that hole, the elevation gain may not be 150, but it is pushing the limits of walking. I had to traverse to get up.

FWIW, I like throwing understable uphill, sometimes a slower disc so that it glides at the lower speeds. DX Teebird has worked well for me, too.

On that pictured hole #8, I throw a bright colored understable fairway. It tends to get near the top and the bright color is easier to find if (if? when) it rolls 400 ft back down the mountain. 5 is a good score.
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  #24  
Old 02-24-2010, 11:19 AM
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Mile High Golfer Mile High Golfer is offline
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Here is some elevation for you. The whole left side is ob and the pin is by the green table.

Kiss it Goodbye. Aspen, CO

http://www.flickr.com/photos/scottsh...7619421599339/
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  #25  
Old 02-24-2010, 11:23 AM
tick tick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bikinjack View Post
Did I not read somewhere that every 3 feet of elevation equates to 1 foot of distance? add the height of the basket to the distance (ex., 230ft hole and 20ft up throw a 250ft throw.)
The rule of thumb used by experienced designers is 3 ft of distance for every 1 foot of elevation change. Thus the 200' hole with 150' of elevation throws like a 650' hole (200' + 450'). A 200' tough par 4! This rule works a little better for uphill than downhill shots.

Personally I usually throw a putter on seriously steep downhill shots, although on really open shots I might throw an understable driver like the light TL mentioned. I lost a putter in the treetops downhill from me with a poor throw from the tee on a 500' ski-slope hole. (#18 Sipapu). Parked the TL on #18 at Hyland in the Twin Cities.

I'll throw either under or overstable uphill if it provides the control and especially glide that I need.
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  #26  
Old 02-24-2010, 11:29 AM
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Consider the airspeed. Throwing downhill will create more airspeed causing the disc to act less stable. Throwing uphill will be slower and the disc will act more stable.
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  #27  
Old 02-24-2010, 11:30 AM
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prerube prerube is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tick View Post
The rule of thumb used by experienced designers is 3 ft of distance for every 1 foot of elevation change. Thus the 200' hole with 150' of elevation throws like a 650' hole (200' + 450'). A 200' tough par 4! This rule works a little better for uphill than downhill shots.

Personally I usually throw a putter on seriously steep downhill shots, although on really open shots I might throw an understable driver like the light TL mentioned. I lost a putter in the treetops downhill from me with a poor throw from the tee on a 500' ski-slope hole. (#18 Sipapu). Parked the TL on #18 at Hyland in the Twin Cities.

I'll throw either under or overstable uphill if it provides the control and especially glide that I need.
I am not sure that is how the equation is translated, and wouldn't downhill equation be more like 200-150 = 50ft
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  #28  
Old 02-24-2010, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tick View Post
The rule of thumb used by experienced designers is 3 ft of distance for every 1 foot of elevation change. Thus the 200' hole with 150' of elevation throws like a 650' hole (200' + 450'). A 200' tough par 4! This rule works a little better for uphill than downhill shots.

Personally I usually throw a putter on seriously steep downhill shots, although on really open shots I might throw an understable driver like the light TL mentioned. I lost a putter in the treetops downhill from me with a poor throw from the tee on a 500' ski-slope hole. (#18 Sipapu). Parked the TL on #18 at Hyland in the Twin Cities.

I'll throw either under or overstable uphill if it provides the control and especially glide that I need.
Way to butcher my words. If you're gonna quote me, quote me. If you're gonna quote smyith quote smyith.

Last edited by bikinjack; 02-24-2010 at 11:57 AM.
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  #29  
Old 02-24-2010, 11:59 AM
nitegolfer nitegolfer is offline
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Number 8 Campgaw

I would probably throw a beat Champ Sidewinder (168) on that hole. Or my lighter 160g Sidewinder.

When throwing uphill the disc is probably gonna have the nose up a little more than normal while throwing downhill usually means the disc will have its nose down a little more.
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  #30  
Old 02-24-2010, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mile High Golfer View Post
Here is some elevation for you. The whole left side is ob and the pin is by the green table.

Kiss it Goodbye. Aspen, CO

http://www.flickr.com/photos/scottsh...7619421599339/
Wow, that is one of the most amazing disc golf photos I've ever seen. I think I'd have to go with something understable there...I wonder how many thousands of feet people have thrown OB on this hole...
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