#3941  
Old 08-15-2013, 08:33 PM
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MrFixIt MrFixIt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecoin View Post
Should I get rid of the Groove I just bought because I didn't know any better?
You can always use it for target practice...
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  #3942  
Old 08-15-2013, 10:36 PM
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BrotherDave BrotherDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecoin View Post
Should I get rid of the Groove I just bought because I didn't know any better?
Nah, any disc is worth a test drive first. The only reason to drop a Groove immediately is if it's obviously way too fast for you.

Grooves are great for dyeing practice too.
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  #3943  
Old 08-15-2013, 11:23 PM
SDMike SDMike is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherDave View Post
Nah, any disc is worth a test drive first. The only reason to drop a Groove immediately is if it's obviously way too fast for you.
Grooves are great for dyeing practice too.
How can you tell if a disc is way too fast for you? Serious question.
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  #3944  
Old 08-15-2013, 11:41 PM
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Dan Ensor Dan Ensor is offline
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I thought I had a good explanation for mike. I was wrong. Sorry for this post.

All I'll say is that a disc shouldn't fade out until late in the flight.

Last edited by Dan Ensor; 08-15-2013 at 11:44 PM.
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  #3945  
Old 08-16-2013, 12:21 AM
knave knave is offline
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Yep, what ^ he said.
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  #3946  
Old 08-16-2013, 12:40 AM
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BrotherDave BrotherDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDMike View Post
How can you tell if a disc is way too fast for you? Serious question.
It's all relative, more or less.

Easiest with stable (middle stability, i.e. straight) discs. These feel very "speed stable" to people that can't get them up to speed, meaning they act more overstable than they really are. A good example would be a Wraith, if a player uses a Wraith for headwinds and throws it into a proper headwind and the disc goes straight or turns over (b/c the wind moving over the disc makes the disc behave as if it was travelling at a faster speed) than that player wasn't getting the disc up to speed enough to see the true flight of that Wraith.

Generally, a good thing to do is to take some discs of varying speeds and throw them all in a field for distance (not necessarily max D lines but long golf distance lines where accuracy is still important) and just observe the consistent results of which discs are out ranging which and by how much. For example, say you threw a Teebird, Wraith, and Cannon and the Teebird consistently flew farther than the other two. There's a great chance the Wraith and Cannon were too fast for you. Or all three are pretty close together, like within 15-20' from shortest to longest. Pretty good chance the Wraith and Cannon were a bit too fast unless you're getting 400'+ out of all these.

Bottom line is that elite throwers can throw midranges like 400' and most drivers are definitely capable of that, you just have to give the slower ones more height to carry that far. Of course I'm not advocating sticking to putters and mids until you can throw them hella far but your drivers need to decidedly out range your mids, your mids out range your putters to put things in basic context. If you can get a full flight out of your disc i.e. turn and fade when you want it for a good distance without strong-arming and OATing the hell out of it then you're generally good to go.

Blake Takkunen of DGR had a nice guideline of benchmark discs like an Aviar, Roc, Teebird, etc and what distances players of certain skill level should be able to consistently achieve but I couldn't find it.
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  #3947  
Old 08-16-2013, 12:41 AM
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holotone holotone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDMike View Post
How can you tell if a disc is way too fast for you? Serious question.
I'd say that as a general rule of thumb you should only throw putters / mids until you can get them out to 300ft, then add in fairway drivers until you're throwing 350ft, and only bust out distance drivers (speed 10 an above) if you're throwing 350+.
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  #3948  
Old 08-16-2013, 01:07 AM
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BrotherDave BrotherDave is offline
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Originally Posted by holotone View Post
I'd say that as a general rule of thumb you should only throw putters / mids until you can get them out to 300ft, then add in fairway drivers until you're throwing 350ft, and only bust out distance drivers (speed 10 an above) if you're throwing 350+.
I'm going to respectfully disagree a little bit.

Even absolute beginners are fine throwing really slow drivers like Cheetahs, Leopards, Cyclones, etc, especially in base plastic. Drivers teach you how to throw with proper nose angle a lot better than the more nose up forgiving mids and putters. The other wrinkle to this is that even if you can't throw a driver that much farther than a mid or putter, they're still useful b/c they fly on lower lines easier and if you play predominantly wooded courses often you'll encounter a lot of low ceiling fairways where a driver is often a more rewarding choice.

Basically, anyone trying to become a well-rounded a disc golfer shouldn't be afraid to bag a slow fairway driver at all. You just don't want to fall in the trap of, "well, I should drive my driver off the tee every hole b/c it says driver on it, and only use my putter to putt with," and so forth.
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  #3949  
Old 08-16-2013, 01:33 AM
Time2Shine Time2Shine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherDave View Post
I'm going to respectfully disagree a little bit.

Even absolute beginners are fine throwing really slow drivers like Cheetahs, Leopards, Cyclones, etc, especially in base plastic. Drivers teach you how to throw with proper nose angle a lot better than the more nose up forgiving mids and putters. The other wrinkle to this is that even if you can't throw a driver that much farther than a mid or putter, they're still useful b/c they fly on lower lines easier and if you play predominantly wooded courses often you'll encounter a lot of low ceiling fairways where a driver is often a more rewarding choice.

Basically, anyone trying to become a well-rounded a disc golfer shouldn't be afraid to bag a slow fairway driver at all. You just don't want to fall in the trap of, "well, I should drive my driver off the tee every hole b/c it says driver on it, and only use my putter to putt with," and so forth.
Pretty much how I feel about the whole thing.

I agree that atleast 1 fairway and distance driver should be in every bag.

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  #3950  
Old 08-16-2013, 07:31 AM
dgar dgar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherDave View Post
I'm going to respectfully disagree a little bit.

Even absolute beginners are fine throwing really slow drivers like Cheetahs, Leopards, Cyclones, etc, especially in base plastic.
Thanks for the info...curious why you say "especially the base plastic" I'm a new player, been at this a couple months now, usually play 4 or five times a week, and I'm finally throwing a few drivers that don't immediately hook left.

My current drivers are a Dragon, and a 150gr beat in Leopard DX, I think the 150 gr may be too light for me, I just purchased a Valkyrie 168 in CH plastic yesterday.. haven't had a chance to throw it enough yet to see if its going to work for me.

I'd like to keep throwing my drivers, maybe add a few, but was curious about the base plastic comment, I just prefer the feel of the Champ plastic although I understand it takes longer to break in.. but in the heavily wooded course I play trees seem to speed up the break in period.. another reason I like the champ plastic is they don't seem to get nicked up nearly as bad when I'm chopping timber with my disc.

Thanks
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