#3951  
Old 08-16-2013, 07:39 AM
Aim For The Chains's Avatar
Aim For The Chains Aim For The Chains is offline
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Base plastics are generally slower and have more "glide" to them than compared to premium plastics which are faster and generally more overstable than a base plastic of the same mold.

Its not a huge deal though as there are still understable premium plastic discs and IMO boils down to the players own preference in cost, feel and availability. I dont carry any baseline discs fwiw but they have unique flights and beat in to become some of the most workable discs you could have.

Last edited by Aim For The Chains; 08-16-2013 at 07:41 AM.
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  #3952  
Old 08-16-2013, 09:22 AM
SDMike SDMike is offline
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Thanks for the responses guys some good info there. Like I said I'm only 4 months or so in so still learning.

The reason I asked mainly was because I started out with a NukeSS as my only driver which is now beat in pretty good. I am now turning it over or flipping. Today I drove it pretty consistently 375-400 on long T-shots that needed it and it was a feeling of accomplishment to see the disc start on a slight hyzer and then pop up and just gooooo.

Conversely I have a standard Nuke and another SS that I haven't thrown much that really seem to fade hard. I'm wondering I need to throw them each more to get them seasoned before I will really see what they will do or could it be that they are just still too fast for me?

Appreciate all the feedback, one think I am really digging about this community is the general helpfulness of the people involved.
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  #3953  
Old 08-16-2013, 10:00 PM
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BrotherDave BrotherDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aim For The Chains View Post
Base plastics are generally slower and have more "glide" to them than compared to premium plastics which are faster and generally more overstable than a base plastic of the same mold.

Its not a huge deal though as there are still understable premium plastic discs and IMO boils down to the players own preference in cost, feel and availability. I dont carry any baseline discs fwiw but they have unique flights and beat in to become some of the most workable discs you could have.
Precisely, well stated. For n00bs, it's generally best to err on the side of caution and try base plastic first b/c: A) it's cheap, B) it's more likely to be straight and C) a lot of the older discs fly better (glide, go farther) in them (b/c their molds were designed before the Champ kind of plastic was available).

For beginners that play predominately wooded courses, base vs premium debate is murkier. Base plastic does get beat up and warped a lot faster but it's not as bad as people make out. You just have to do what the old timers did, bend them back into shape, throw, and repeat. If you couldn't get x-outs and factory 2nds for pretty cheap, I'd still probably prefer starting out on base plastic. A lot of the faster discs (speed 10+) do kind of suck in base plastic b/c of all the weight along the wider rims makes them taco-prone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SDMike View Post
Thanks for the responses guys some good info there. Like I said I'm only 4 months or so in so still learning.

The reason I asked mainly was because I started out with a NukeSS as my only driver which is now beat in pretty good. I am now turning it over or flipping. Today I drove it pretty consistently 375-400 on long T-shots that needed it and it was a feeling of accomplishment to see the disc start on a slight hyzer and then pop up and just gooooo.

Conversely I have a standard Nuke and another SS that I haven't thrown much that really seem to fade hard. I'm wondering I need to throw them each more to get them seasoned before I will really see what they will do or could it be that they are just still too fast for me?

Appreciate all the feedback, one think I am really digging about this community is the general helpfulness of the people involved.
Nukes are pretty inconsistent so you probably just need to break those in and see what you have. Your distances are a little on the minimal limits for having business throwing something as fast as a Nuke so I can't really comment on them being too fast without seeing you throw. You could see some benefit from throwing something a little slower or you could be a form tweak away from tacking on an extra 50' or so onto your throw, could go either way.
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  #3954  
Old 08-17-2013, 04:54 AM
disctildeath disctildeath is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherDave View Post
I'm going to respectfully disagree a little bit.

Even absolute beginners are fine throwing really slow drivers like Cheetahs, Leopards, Cyclones, etc, especially in base plastic. Drivers teach you how to throw with proper nose angle a lot better than the more nose up forgiving mids and putters. The other wrinkle to this is that even if you can't throw a driver that much farther than a mid or putter, they're still useful b/c they fly on lower lines easier and if you play predominantly wooded courses often you'll encounter a lot of low ceiling fairways where a driver is often a more rewarding choice.

Basically, anyone trying to become a well-rounded a disc golfer shouldn't be afraid to bag a slow fairway driver at all. You just don't want to fall in the trap of, "well, I should drive my driver off the tee every hole b/c it says driver on it, and only use my putter to putt with," and so forth.
I have to agree, I've been playing for 6 years and most of the people I know along with myself will never be able to throw a mid-range 300 ft, and believe me I've watched every clinic video possible, have a portable I practice on regularly (an hour almost everyday) and still never get consistently better (does help with putting) or get this kind of distance with putters or mids. I throw a Teebird much more consistently and with better control than a mid-range even on densely wooded courses. I will agree with the person you quoted in the sense you should probably stay away from anything with a rim over 2.0 cm if hitting 400 isn't a realistic possibility, but especially now with Innova running the Beast in Blizzard (hopefully the Orc is coming soon) and base plastics offering light weights it won't hurt players to use a driver.
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  #3955  
Old 08-26-2013, 08:32 AM
dgar dgar is offline
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? about used and new disc

Sorry these may be silly questions..

What is the "sleepy scale" people use when selling disc.


The Inova disc that have the BIG star are often times advertised as First Run, is this correct? Also many of them dont have the mold printed on them? sure would be nice to have the name of disc to simplify identifying it later..

One last one.. Jolly Rancher plastic.. please explain, I have a Mako 3 St Patricks day stamp I believe I read that it was JR plastic.. seems very similar to Champ plastic


Thanks
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  #3956  
Old 08-26-2013, 09:10 AM
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MrGlass01 MrGlass01 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgar View Post
Sorry these may be silly questions..

What is the "sleepy scale" people use when selling disc.


The Inova disc that have the BIG star are often times advertised as First Run, is this correct? Also many of them dont have the mold printed on them? sure would be nice to have the name of disc to simplify identifying it later..

One last one.. Jolly Rancher plastic.. please explain, I have a Mako 3 St Patricks day stamp I believe I read that it was JR plastic.. seems very similar to Champ plastic


Thanks
1. Sleepy is stickies on top of the market place. It's the way we rate used discs for sale or trade.
2. Those are referred to as protostar and yes they are first runs.
3. Jr plastic is newer champ that looks like jolly ranchers. It's stiffer and the mako3 is probably jr. Hope this helps.
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  #3957  
Old 08-26-2013, 09:54 AM
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NuNinja NuNinja is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgar View Post
Sorry these may be silly questions..

What is the "sleepy scale" people use when selling disc.


The Inova disc that have the BIG star are often times advertised as First Run, is this correct? Also many of them dont have the mold printed on them? sure would be nice to have the name of disc to simplify identifying it later..

One last one.. Jolly Rancher plastic.. please explain, I have a Mako 3 St Patricks day stamp I believe I read that it was JR plastic.. seems very similar to Champ plastic


Thanks
Quote:
Disc Condition Scale aka "The Sleepy Scale"
10 - Never thrown, no ink, brand new condition
9 - Field tested or used for one or two rounds
8 - Lightly used with very minimal wear
7 - Used with some minor dings or scuffs but still in good shape
6 - Typical used disc with the usual dings, scratches but still worthy
5 - Kinda beat, significant wear, has lost a good bit of it's stability
4 - Beat up turnover disc with some evident war story wear
3 or under - Beat to Hades dog chew toy
I believe first runs are now usually tournament stamped. I don't know if this has always been the case, but some(if not all) newer "Protostar" discs are not actually first runs. Someone will correct if I am wrong.

Innova calls it "Jolly Launcher". It tends to be a bit more gummy or grippy and clear/glassy than older champ runs in my opinion.
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  #3958  
Old 08-26-2013, 11:43 AM
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PMantle PMantle is offline
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When people set up a photo shoot in #6 fairway because they don't know there's a disc course there, do you:

attempt to get them to move
throw way around them knowing you're going to lose a stroke
skip the hole?
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  #3959  
Old 08-26-2013, 01:27 PM
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plastic cannon plastic cannon is offline
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I would tell them that they are in danger of getting hit.
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  #3960  
Old 08-26-2013, 01:38 PM
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BigSky BigSky is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PMantle View Post
When people set up a photo shoot in #6 fairway because they don't know there's a disc course there, do you:

attempt to get them to move
throw way around them knowing you're going to lose a stroke
skip the hole?
I'm assuming they are in a public park, right? They have the right to be there also, so I'd probably skip the hole. If they were just arriving, I might wave that I'm throwing. Either way I'd warn them of the danger of being in the fairway.
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