#1  
Old 04-17-2009, 12:08 AM
SomeChump SomeChump is offline
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Ratings/Handicaps

I finally figured out what the "ratings" system means. I.e. 1000 is what a world class player would play a typical course at, 10 points less for every additional throw you need to finish the course.

I have also found "Disc Golf U" and put a few of my recent scores in. It tells me my handicap is 11. What would that translate to in the ratings system?

Also, what division should I be playing in when I enter minis? Am I a rec player or an advanced player? (I'm sure I'm not an "open" player.) Is there an intermediate division ever?
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  #2  
Old 04-17-2009, 12:29 AM
mcrow mcrow is offline
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I'm not sure how accurate it is but comparing you handicap to mine I would say you would be rated around 800 to 825.

That would place you in the novice division. A lot of tournaments don't have novice/recreational divisions so you would likely play with the intermediates.
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Old 04-17-2009, 12:36 AM
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TalbotTrojan TalbotTrojan is offline
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Novice is an interesting division but I am guessing that is the best division for you if you have not yet played in tournaments. I have been playing Rec since I started in tournaments and the first three I was way outmatched. I am finally getting to the point where I can compete and even finished in the payout in my last tournament (woo hoo for more plastic in my bag, and a real nice towel). I have not made an account on DGU as I basically think it is a way for Innova to rule the world (go look at the pro shop on the site, that being said all the discs in my bag are Innova).
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Old 04-17-2009, 02:30 AM
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ERicJ ERicJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeChump View Post
I finally figured out what the "ratings" system means. I.e. 1000 is what a world class player would play a typical course at, 10 points less for every additional throw you need to finish the course.
Pretty close, if typical course is one with an SSA of 50.4.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mcrow View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeChump View Post
I have also found "Disc Golf U" and put a few of my recent scores in. It tells me my handicap is 11. What would that translate to in the ratings system?
I'm not sure how accurate it is but comparing you handicap to mine I would say you would be rated around 800 to 825.
DGU has my handicap at "9" based on 15 rounds I put in from the back half of 2008 when I would say I was an 860-870ish player.

The DGU handicaps are all over the place and depend A LOT on the subjective accuracy of the course data they have in their database. That course data was pretty empty or dubious when I was looking at it back in December.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeChump View Post
Also, what division should I be playing in when I enter minis? Am I a rec player or an advanced player? (I'm sure I'm not an "open" player.) Is there an intermediate division ever?
Enter Rec/MA3.

You can see all the available PDGA divisions here:
http://www.pdga.com/documents/divisi...points-factors
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Old 04-17-2009, 05:30 AM
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tamahawk tamahawk is offline
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this is a subject that i don't really understand. i understand the handicap thing, assuming it is similar to ball golf, but the player rating i don't understand. i'm not a big tourney player anyway, but would like to have an idea of what this rating system is about.

a couple of questions:
1) What is SSA?
2) How does the rating system work?

I hear the term 1000rated frequenty, but never really understood this rating system.
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Old 04-17-2009, 06:30 AM
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harr0140 harr0140 is offline
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DGU sucks! Nothing more needs to be said, I have no idea why PDGA aligned itself witht hat site. The handicaps are completely inaccurate and not even precise!
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Old 04-17-2009, 08:44 AM
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swellerdiscgolf swellerdiscgolf is offline
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I was using the DGU site and everytime I put in a new score, my handicap would go up. It didn't seem to matter weather I played better or worse. So I finally said screw it, I'll do it myself. Then I found this site. And as they say....The rest was history!
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:46 AM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamahawk View Post
this is a subject that i don't really understand. i understand the handicap thing, assuming it is similar to ball golf, but the player rating i don't understand. i'm not a big tourney player anyway, but would like to have an idea of what this rating system is about.

a couple of questions:
1) What is SSA?
2) How does the rating system work?

I hear the term 1000rated frequenty, but never really understood this rating system.
Here's an approximate description, very much simplified as the actual math is above my head.

A 1000-rated player is a world-class player. A 1000-rating is a benchmark.

In each tournament, rounds are rated based roughly on how all the players shoot against their ratings. Roughly speaking, if you averaged the ratings of all the players coming in, then averaged the round ratings, you'd get the same thing. So in a given round some people will shoot better than they normally do....some worse....but the system compares your rating coming in, and how you scored, with everyone else's rating coming in, and how they scored, and produces a round rating for each score. It can change slightly from round-to-round on the same course, depending on conditions.

A player's rating is determined by his average round rating over a certain number of recent rounds, though any rounds deviating too much are dropped.

The 10-points-per-stroke is an approximation. It depends on the course. On easier courses it might be 12-points-per-stroke; on harder ones, 7 or 8.

A given course's SSA is the score that produced a 1000-rated round. Courses don't have fixed SSAs, but if the layout stays the same, the SSA will be very close to the same from event to event.

So, for example....if the SSA of a course is 50---that is, in tournaments a score of 50 produces a 1000 rating.....you can roughly guess that a score of 60 will produce a 900 rating. Or, to reverse it, if your rating is 900, expect to shoot about 60.
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Old 04-17-2009, 11:24 AM
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ERicJ ERicJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
Here's an approximate description, very much simplified as the actual math is above my head.

A 1000-rated player is a world-class player. A 1000-rating is a benchmark.

In each tournament, rounds are rated based roughly on how all the players shoot against their ratings. Roughly speaking, if you averaged the ratings of all the players coming in, then averaged the round ratings, you'd get the same thing. So in a given round some people will shoot better than they normally do....some worse....but the system compares your rating coming in, and how you scored, with everyone else's rating coming in, and how they scored, and produces a round rating for each score. It can change slightly from round-to-round on the same course, depending on conditions.

A player's rating is determined by his average round rating over a certain number of recent rounds, though any rounds deviating too much are dropped.

The 10-points-per-stroke is an approximation. It depends on the course. On easier courses it might be 12-points-per-stroke; on harder ones, 7 or 8.

A given course's SSA is the score that produced a 1000-rated round. Courses don't have fixed SSAs, but if the layout stays the same, the SSA will be very close to the same from event to event.

So, for example....if the SSA of a course is 50---that is, in tournaments a score of 50 produces a 1000 rating.....you can roughly guess that a score of 60 will produce a 900 rating. Or, to reverse it, if your rating is 900, expect to shoot about 60.
Very well put.

A couple things I'll add. The SSA (Scratch Scoring Average) is the score a 1000-rated player would expect to average on that course. Since it is an average it will obviously vary from round to round.

Weather can significantly effect the SSA of a course, especially if there are a lot of AMs playing the course. In the calculation of the SSA a player rated 1020 factors in with the same weight as a player rated 820. However, in adverse conditions the 1000+ rated player is much more likely to shoot closer to their rating. Whereas lower skilled AM players are typically more volatile in their scoring and when you add in adverse weather they typically even worse. So if your player pool is populated by a lot of lower skilled players and the rain is pouring and the wind is howling expect to see a significantly higher SSA than if you had a player pool of all Pros.
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  #10  
Old 04-17-2009, 11:48 AM
t i m t i m is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ERicJ View Post
Very well put.

A couple things I'll add. The SSA (Scratch Scoring Average) is the score a 1000-rated player would expect to average on that course. Since it is an average it will obviously vary from round to round.

Weather can significantly effect the SSA of a course, especially if there are a lot of AMs playing the course. In the calculation of the SSA a player rated 1020 factors in with the same weight as a player rated 820. However, in adverse conditions the 1000+ rated player is much more likely to shoot closer to their rating. Whereas lower skilled AM players are typically more volatile in their scoring and when you add in adverse weather they typically even worse. So if your player pool is populated by a lot of lower skilled players and the rain is pouring and the wind is howling expect to see a significantly higher SSA than if you had a player pool of all Pros.
Not necessarily true. Even pros take quite a few hits from the wind. I don't think skill level of the players matters that much -- wind affects everyone. And in crazy conditions, the SSA for a course will be several strokes high no matter who is playing.

For pros, the wind is not going to affect their drives as much, but it will mean they make a lot less long putts, which will add several strokes per round.

For low-rated players, they take a lot more 3s, 4s and 5s anyway. Low-rated players loose the most strokes on putts. Short putts hit metal or miss close and then they just have a drop in. If you're a low-rated player and you're shooting a lot of 4s on a clear day, wind may not matter that much -- you'll still take a lot of the same 4s if you play at all smart.

And a lot of mid-rated players are folks who have been playing for a long time and are pretty smart and have good mental games, and the wind actually helps them shoot better than their peers -- relatively speaking.

Wind/rain/other adverse conditions does add to scores, but I think it affects every skill range of player in a pretty similar way.
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