#3041  
Old 09-27-2012, 04:42 PM
BigSky's Avatar
BigSky BigSky is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Years Playing: 3.6
Courses Played: 1
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 7,167
Dang it to all the testers

I had no desire to buy an N Axis until your reviews

Thanks for the reviews, and making me blow money on more discs!
Sponsored Links
  #3042  
Old 09-27-2012, 05:05 PM
Rogue9 Rogue9 is offline
Birdie Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Norcal
Posts: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by discspeed View Post

2 Axis (pink 178, blue 177, both moderate domes)
The two Axis fly pretty similarly to each other. However, they are quite a different animal from the Protons. To me, the Axis feels a little better with some dome, so that along with the grippier plastic really makes these feel much better in my hand. Flightwise these are flying much more like midrange versions of the Anode than my other Axis do...Meaning they are more HSS and drop slower than the older Axis. I like my FR green Axis for it's stability, but honestly it flies like it weighs 10 grams more than it does, dropping quickly as soon as it loses speed. While these N Axis are still spin hungry, they have a lot more carry at the end of their flight. While fairly domey compared to most P Axis, these N Axis don't fly like the domey pink FR Axis either, as they are a lot less LSS (and perhaps more HSS). These discs have me quite excited as they really seem like something new to me...I'm anxious to see what they think about a headwind though before I get too excited.
So, to make sure I am understanding you correctly. They are straighter at lower speeds (less rpm?) than Ps?
  #3043  
Old 09-27-2012, 05:11 PM
BigSky's Avatar
BigSky BigSky is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Years Playing: 3.6
Courses Played: 1
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 7,167
If I understand Discspeed correctly, the N Axis is both less likely to turn at the start of the flight, AND less likely to fade at the end, than the Proton Axis. I'm not sure how this is possible, but gyro might explain it.
  #3044  
Old 09-27-2012, 06:01 PM
discspeed's Avatar
discspeed discspeed is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: MI
Posts: 3,314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue9 View Post
So, to make sure I am understanding you correctly. They are straighter at lower speeds (less rpm?) than Ps?
They glide better at lower speeds, which means they are still gliding when they start to fade, so they are not really straighter at low speeds...Probably won't be straighter until they break in a little.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigSky View Post
If I understand Discspeed correctly, the N Axis is both less likely to turn at the start of the flight, AND less likely to fade at the end, than the Proton Axis. I'm not sure how this is possible, but gyro might explain it.
Getting a true no-turn-no-fade shot requires the thrower to impart the perfect amount of spin to keep the disc flying level at the perfect height so that the disc hits the ground before it stops spinning enough to cause fade. No disc truly makes this easy for someone who is not skilled enough to do as I describe above. I just want to state this so that no one buys a N Axis and is pissed at me because it doesn't fly straight without fade for them...

That being said, the N Axis is good at this because it's HSS allows it to be thrown perfectly flat without turning, the disc likes to ride flat, and it drops straight before it starts to fade. I think the dome on the N version helps with this because it allows the disc to keep gliding straight as it slows, where flatter discs tend to stall out earlier.
  #3045  
Old 09-27-2012, 06:16 PM
BigSky's Avatar
BigSky BigSky is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Years Playing: 3.6
Courses Played: 1
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 7,167
Thanks for the info Discspeed. I've been leaving my Axis behind for the X Comet because I wanted a straighter flight with less fade. The Comet seems pretty finicky though. And, it's not great in the wind.

The N Axis sounds like the perfect blend of laser and glide, without turning with a good rip.
  #3046  
Old 09-27-2012, 06:37 PM
ZAMson's Avatar
ZAMson ZAMson is offline
^Has PhD in Disc-Artistry
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Slaughter Ln, Austin TX
Posts: 2,632
Axis & Vector, they be live.
  #3047  
Old 09-27-2012, 06:54 PM
onemilemore's Avatar
onemilemore onemilemore is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: San Marcos, CA
Years Playing: 3.8
Courses Played: 25
Throwing Style: LHBH
Posts: 4,877
Snagged the lightest Vector they had, 171. Really wanted an Axis in that weight, but to no avail.
  #3048  
Old 09-27-2012, 10:02 PM
McJesus's Avatar
McJesus McJesus is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,024
Just got my second ACE today with my P vector after I fished it out of a pond. And to think, I was gonna leave it. My love has been solidified.
  #3049  
Old 09-27-2012, 10:15 PM
zj1002 zj1002 is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Driving Range
Years Playing: 7.1
Courses Played: 28
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 1,906
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZAMson View Post
Axis & Vector, they be live.
Best feeling MVP plastic to date. No question

Über grippy. The axis neutron molded up great
 

  #3050  
Old 09-27-2012, 11:14 PM
Mad Scientist's Avatar
Mad Scientist Mad Scientist is offline
Birdie Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Courses Played: 2
Posts: 391
Question - are the core and overmold "keyed" into one another, like the first runs? The cross-section view on the MVP website shows an illustration with a smooth face along the edge of the core. Is that just to simplify the concept, or is that how they are made now? Just curious.
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.