Disc Golf Store
  #1  
Old 05-19-2009, 01:21 PM
OLAD OLAD is offline
Bogey Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Edmond, OK
Years Playing: 9.7
Courses Played: 5
Posts: 50
Help with accuracy

I have been playing off and on for about 4 years. Up until this year I only cared about getting out and hanging w/ my friends. This year I am actually trying to improve my game. So far everything I know has pretty much been self taught. I've watched the Dan Beato video on YouTube and just watched other players. I'm pretty sure I'm missing something. I can throw fairly accurately to about 200' (I'm guessing). But once I start trying to put some power into it the discs go right. They are nice straight drives, just going the wrong way. So here is my question: What do I need to do to learn to drive accurately with distance? Are there DVDs that would help me? Do I just need to go throw in a field for hours on end? Do I need to find a clinic near me? I'm at a loss of where to go from here.
Sponsored Links
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-19-2009, 01:30 PM
SomeChump SomeChump is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Courses Played: 33
Posts: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by OLAD View Post
I have been playing off and on for about 4 years. Up until this year I only cared about getting out and hanging w/ my friends. This year I am actually trying to improve my game. So far everything I know has pretty much been self taught. I've watched the Dan Beato video on YouTube and just watched other players. I'm pretty sure I'm missing something. I can throw fairly accurately to about 200' (I'm guessing). But once I start trying to put some power into it the discs go right. They are nice straight drives, just going the wrong way. So here is my question: What do I need to do to learn to drive accurately with distance? Are there DVDs that would help me? Do I just need to go throw in a field for hours on end? Do I need to find a clinic near me? I'm at a loss of where to go from here.
1) Throw accurate discs (midranges)

2) Practice at least once in a field for every round you go play.

3) Discs turn right for only a few reasons:

They are being thrown faster than they are designed to fly
They're being thrown with too much nose down
They are being thrown with an anhyzer release
They're too old and beat and you need new ones
You release the disc toward the right (griplock)
You're applying the infamous off-axis-torque (OAT.)

The first five are pretty easy to fix on your own. The last seems to be a life-long quest.

I suggest you spend a little money on a new mid-range (say a Roc or a Buzz or something else reasonably stable) and a new fairway driver (say a TL, a Teebird or similar) and go out to a field for an hour and practice NOT throwing to the right (aim left, hyzer release with more stable discs). I cut 10 throws off my rounds the first month I actually started practicing instead of just playing.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-19-2009, 01:31 PM
mashnut's Avatar
mashnut mashnut is offline
*Super Moderator*
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Temecula, CA
Years Playing: 12.7
Courses Played: 816
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 13,966
If you are doing any kind of run up to your drives, you might try eliminating that for the time being, and just work on your accuracy from a standstill. Once you get more consistency, you could add back steps one at a time and try to keep that same consistency. Worked for me.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-19-2009, 02:08 PM
OLAD OLAD is offline
Bogey Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Edmond, OK
Years Playing: 9.7
Courses Played: 5
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeChump View Post
3) Discs turn right for only a few reasons:

They are being thrown faster than they are designed to fly
They're being thrown with too much nose down
They are being thrown with an anhyzer release
They're too old and beat and you need new ones
You release the disc toward the right (griplock)
You're applying the infamous off-axis-torque (OAT.)
Out of these I think my issue is griplock. The discs don't seem to have any anhyzer when I release.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeChump View Post
I suggest you spend a little money on a new mid-range (say a Roc or a Buzz or something else reasonably stable) and a new fairway driver (say a TL, a Teebird or similar) and go out to a field for an hour and practice NOT throwing to the right (aim left, hyzer release with more stable discs). I cut 10 throws off my rounds the first month I actually started practicing instead of just playing.
I only have about 4 discs and was thinking of getting some more for practice. I'll be sure to get ones that you suggest. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
If you are doing any kind of run up to your drives, you might try eliminating that for the time being, and just work on your accuracy from a standstill. Once you get more consistency, you could add back steps one at a time and try to keep that same consistency. Worked for me.
For me to get any accuracy I have to throw from standing still. It is when I add steps or a pull that I have issues. Not sure I'm using the term pull right. To get an accurate 200' shot I am throwing from my right pec standing still.

Thanks for the ideas.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-19-2009, 02:12 PM
OLAD OLAD is offline
Bogey Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Edmond, OK
Years Playing: 9.7
Courses Played: 5
Posts: 50
Ok, after looking at the distances on my home course again I am more likely only throwing between 125' and 150' accurately.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-19-2009, 03:08 PM
SomeChump SomeChump is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Courses Played: 33
Posts: 630
If you're only throwing 125 accurately, it sounds like you need to work on your form. Practice, practice, practice. I can probably only throw 125 too if I don't bring the disc past my right pec.

The key to adding distance is to use your body rather than your arm to throw.

Start out facing the basket, then gradually turn your body more and more to the left. Your distance will get longer each time. Then, when you're perpendicular (shoulders in line with the basket) you can start taking the disc further back. First to your left pec, then a little past your body, then as far as you can reach. Your drive starts in your feet, then your hips, back, and shoulders, arm, and wrist. Once you can do that well, it's time to learn an X-step. The purpose of a run-up is NOT to get a little more speed, it is to get your body even more wound up than you could otherwise. I laugh when I see Barneys doing a run up and not x-stepping. What's the point?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-19-2009, 04:00 PM
sumner420 sumner420 is offline
Bogey Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Western Massachusetts
Years Playing: 12.5
Courses Played: 10
Posts: 97
To improve accuracy I would say to practice from a standstill, use your elbow and shoulder as a guide for direction.
Don't forget to allow your body rotate, a good followthrough should pull your back leg up from it's plant and wrap it around the front of your body, following the lead of your throwing arm, this will add torque to the throw, but should keep the accuracy you need because you don't ever need to take your eyes of the prize.
Also be aware of your forward motion, from a standstill its more of a weight shift from back leg to front as the disc passes the center line of you torso.
After this motion is ingrained into your subconcious, add the steps to it.
Just my two cents...
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-19-2009, 07:08 PM
A.Mutt's Avatar
A.Mutt A.Mutt is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Central Ohio
Years Playing: 11.5
Courses Played: 34
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 1,350
One thing that has helped me with accuracy is to think of it like playing catch with an imaginary person/dog. Bear in mind I'm not very accurate backhand yet but this strategy has taken me from only hitting my lines on dumb luck to getting them about a third of the time on purpose. Its a work in progress and I'm in very much the same scenario as you, having only been casual to hang with friends until this year.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-19-2009, 08:06 PM
BrotherDave's Avatar
BrotherDave BrotherDave is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NC
Years Playing: 7.3
Courses Played: 102
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 11,419
Something that practically eliminated all my grip lock issues was when I adopted the stack grip.
This is the article that pic came from, pretty helpful, just make sure your pull is straight, i.e. your not pulling through in an arc and you should be better.
http://discgolfreview.com/resources/...ttoripit.shtml
Reply With Quote
 

  #10  
Old 05-19-2009, 10:32 PM
klay's Avatar
klay klay is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Eagle County, CO
Years Playing: 6.5
Courses Played: 147
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 810
Just chiming in to say thanks for all the replies. I'm in the same boat as the OP, but with under a year of experience.

Still trying to figure out all the variables like form, grip, and appropriate disc types and every time I come on here I learn something new.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.