#1  
Old 05-28-2015, 04:08 PM
bfowler bfowler is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Charlotte, NC
Years Playing: 3.3
Courses Played: 21
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 1,128
Sinking your hips

During a drive I try to shift my weight from back to forward keeping balance between the insteps of my feet. My drive is stuck between 330-350 but I'm pretty consistent with it.

I've been searching for ways to feel or get more power and focused on dropping my rear knee inward and/or rotating my back hip inward. I'm not sure which one causes which.

It feels more like the weight of my butt and lower spine are dropping or sliding down and forward into my front foot.

Normally everything, hips, shoulders, core, front foot kind of rotate at the same time or very close. Doing this sinking of my hips it feels like my back hip/femur is rotating internally which my front foot plants. My hips turn into my front leg until the pressure causes me to rotate on my heel.

I'm not sure exactly what I'm asking but I wanted to explore the situation and discuss it some. I feel a lot more braced and planted and it feels a lot more like I throw with I don't use a run up.
Sponsored Links
Reply With Quote
 

  #2  
Old 05-28-2015, 05:30 PM
sidewinder22's Avatar
sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Creeping Creek DGC
Years Playing: 9.1
Courses Played: 134
Posts: 8,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfowler View Post
During a drive I try to shift my weight from back to forward keeping balance between the insteps of my feet. My drive is stuck between 330-350 but I'm pretty consistent with it.

I've been searching for ways to feel or get more power and focused on dropping my rear knee inward and/or rotating my pelvis inward. I'm not sure which one causes which.

It feels more like the weight of my butt and lower spine are dropping or sliding down and forward into my front foot.

Normally everything, hips, shoulders, core, front foot kind of rotate at the same time or very close. Doing this sinking of my hips it feels like my back hip/femur is rotating externally which my front foot plants. My pelvis turn into my front leg/hip until the pressure causes me to rotate on my heel.

I'm not sure exactly what I'm asking but I wanted to explore the situation and discuss it some. I feel a lot more braced and planted and it feels a lot more like I throw with I don't use a run up.
I'll differentiate between the hips(femurs) and the pelvis. If you turn your pelvis toward the target, your rear hip/femur is externally rotating/extending. So in the backswing your rear hip/femur internally rotates or loads into the pelvis that is turning away from the target, and then in the downswing/forward swing your rear femur externally rotates or explodes from the pelvis, driving it forward toward the target.

The front hip/femur is mirrored during the swing, so that you are internally rotating your femur/hip into the front side of the pelvis as the pelvis is driven forward. Once you have provided enough resistance or internal hip rotation against the pelvis(or pelvis moving into hip/leg), your front knee extends or stiffens and everything pivots (provided you are balanced), this is also known as clearing the hip.

The "knee drop" happens because you made a forward move without spinning out of leverage and your shin is angulated more parallel to the ground(flying). Or it could also happen because you spun out of leverage but didn't' move forward. Which direction your knee "drops" is an indicator. The knee can only "drop" by your foot pivoting or changing the pressure and angle of the foot/ankle. Knee extension and flexion alone doesn't change the knee height.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.