#1  
Old 03-27-2012, 09:54 AM
DSmith's Avatar
DSmith DSmith is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Greens-bro North Cacka-lacka
Years Playing: 9.5
Courses Played: 131
Posts: 678
Temp tee pad advice needed

Im installing 3 "temp" holes on an existing course, that we can switch to for tournaments and whatnot when areas of the existing course are too wet. Im going with having temp pads for now but need a good base material thats cheap, readily available,will resist rutting, and still drains well. I was also thinking of using stall mats on top which are cheap at $40 each.
As a side not all 3 holes are heavily wooded so I dont see alot of power going into shots off the pads. I mainly want the players to have a safe teeing area.

Down the road my plan is to replace the temp pads with concrete.

Thanks in advance on any advice
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-27-2012, 10:23 AM
BogeyNoMore's Avatar
BogeyNoMore BogeyNoMore is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Walled Lake, MI
Years Playing: 10.4
Courses Played: 171
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 6,162
Not sure what stall mats are, but at $40 each, they'd cost way less than Fly pads, mostly cause the material comes in 90 foot rolls. The 3/8" material works out to about $100 per tee (assuming 10' per tee), but you have to buy 9 tees worth = $900.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-27-2012, 12:05 PM
donnyv's Avatar
donnyv donnyv is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: MI
Years Playing: 17.4
Courses Played: 24
Posts: 635
Lightbulb

My course has two swamp holes that are unplayable during spring thaw. We need to move a couple tees too but didn't want to spend the extra $$$ for teepads that would only be used 6-8 weeks a year.

Though not the prettiest, USED higher-grade carpet cut into tee sections (we use 12'x6' pcs.) is a cheap alternative for temp tees when tacked-in place on a flat and well-drained area. You can find some FREE locally on the curbsides on garbage day. They keep the weeds down, won't rut, provide decent traction, transportable (unless wet), and can be easily moved/removed when your concrete tees are installed. They also give you a visual of potential tee areas and if those spots would be ideal for your course.

We have some off-white berber carpet that looks like concrete from a distance. I'll see if I have a pic or two.

just my cheap .02 (actually the carpet was free)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-27-2012, 12:19 PM
esdubya's Avatar
esdubya esdubya is online now
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Oldcastle Ontario
Years Playing: 19.4
Courses Played: 94
Posts: 766
If you frame in the tee area with 4x4 or 2x4 posts, then you will at the very least have a level and stable surface which is a huge factor.

You will also have the frame already there when you do go ahead with the concrete.

Depending on how much time and effort you area able to invest, you could go with large stones as a base, then a smaller stone mid-layer with a fine gravel on top. This would drain well and also be a good solid base when you do pour the concrete.

I prefer a natural (dirt or gravel) surface over carpet. But in Michigan the snow and ice makes carpet really slippery. It may work better in KY. Also, I've not liked carpet tees unless they are installed over a good base and framed in somehow.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-27-2012, 12:34 PM
gwillim gwillim is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Portland, Oregon
Years Playing: 13.4
Courses Played: 161
Throwing Style: LHBH
Posts: 549
Stall mats work great, get the 3/4" if you can! They are so heavy that they compress the ground after a few rounds and are pretty solid feeling. I suggest flipping them upside down so the textured side is up, they are pretty grippy that way. Also, take a shovel and a rake and level the ground below them.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-27-2012, 04:14 PM
Oklahyzer Oklahyzer is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,110
A simple wood frame box with a plywood decking and carpeting or the stall mat...you could even do it with 2 or 3 good shipping pallets. Cheap 1/4" plywood is sufficient as long as you have frame support beneath it...can probably get some low pile carpet or other material for free if you wanted to. As long as you have a reasonably flat surface to place it on, it's a great solution. Takes more time than money, but it'll last longer and be serviceable in all weather if your concrete plans are delayed.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-28-2012, 09:41 AM
donnyv's Avatar
donnyv donnyv is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: MI
Years Playing: 17.4
Courses Played: 24
Posts: 635
^^^^^Just don't make them like our nearby Oakland University's tees. Pretty small and some of them are close to a foot off the ground. Nice little 18-holer but I'd rather play off the grass or dirt than risk rolling my ankle.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-28-2012, 10:16 AM
TwoTechnics's Avatar
TwoTechnics TwoTechnics is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Monterey/San Fransisco,Ca
Posts: 220
the rubber undrside of astroturf or sythentic grass works good.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-17-2012, 11:17 AM
DSmith's Avatar
DSmith DSmith is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Greens-bro North Cacka-lacka
Years Playing: 9.5
Courses Played: 131
Posts: 678
We ended up with framed gravel pads (12x 6). We used what maintenance keeps calling "kitty litter" which I'm guessing is crush and run. Took about a bucket and a half to fill. Same stuff they use at ball parks around high traffic areas. They seem pretty solid and stable for now and the locals love them. All the materials were already available and there was no extra cost to parks and rec.
We may use these to add second pads to the other holes down the line.
Reply With Quote
 

  #10  
Old 04-17-2012, 11:33 AM
1978 1978 is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Charlotte, Nc
Years Playing: 6.2
Courses Played: 180
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 2,999
Pre leveled and framed with 2x4's and dug down so the tops were 1" above ground, all 20 tee pads at Nevin before the concrete pour. We filled with pea gravel that we found. These lasted 2 months before we got concrete with no rutting at all. Only issue was that the gravel would be pushed to the front of the pad a little but a hard rake and 2 minutes fixed those issues.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.