#31  
Old 09-23-2011, 01:41 PM
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superberry superberry is offline
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Crusher dust (aka crushed stone, road base, etc) can compact nearly as hard as asphault. Many of our tees at Winter Park were just laid on top of existing soil and extreme rains can wash these out. Plus they lead to the 'ever widening/lengthening tee syndrome'. What we've learned is that if you take a rototiller (even one of the mini ones) and work up the soil to about 4" and then scoop that out, you can lay the crusher dust into this cavity and keep it from spreading out if it gets soft or wears thin. It also keeps weeds and grass from growing through from underneath. You could line the front edge with a pressure treated board so that there is a clear distinction for the front of the tee. If you live in an area that gets snow, I highly recommend to lay the crusher dust in late fall and and let the weight of the snow and moisture compact the base well all winter long. Otherwise get some buckets of water and a tamper. Tamp the crusher dust, get it wet, and tamp again. These steps should give you some excellent long lasting, shock absorbing, and slip free tees for a good 5 years depending on how much rain you get and how wet the tees get.
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  #32  
Old 09-23-2011, 01:43 PM
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This 4" base of crusher dust is also the first step for future concrete or rubber pads anyway - if you choose to move toward that upgrade option in the future.
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  #33  
Old 09-23-2011, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superberry View Post
Crusher dust (aka crushed stone, road base, etc) can compact nearly as hard as asphault. Many of our tees at Winter Park were just laid on top of existing soil and extreme rains can wash these out. Plus they lead to the 'ever widening/lengthening tee syndrome'. What we've learned is that if you take a rototiller (even one of the mini ones) and work up the soil to about 4" and then scoop that out, you can lay the crusher dust into this cavity and keep it from spreading out if it gets soft or wears thin. It also keeps weeds and grass from growing through from underneath. You could line the front edge with a pressure treated board so that there is a clear distinction for the front of the tee. If you live in an area that gets snow, I highly recommend to lay the crusher dust in late fall and and let the weight of the snow and moisture compact the base well all winter long. Otherwise get some buckets of water and a tamper. Tamp the crusher dust, get it wet, and tamp again. These steps should give you some excellent long lasting, shock absorbing, and slip free tees for a good 5 years depending on how much rain you get and how wet the tees get.

I know you probably don't have a video of doing this, but if someone does this in the future, taping it would be a great addition to this thread and website. I get a lot of what you're saying to do, but for people that have never worked with crush and run or crusher dust, a video would be extremely helpful.
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  #34  
Old 09-23-2011, 02:16 PM
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ill post video when I do it.
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  #35  
Old 09-23-2011, 02:40 PM
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carpet

Carpet can be put directly on the ground. I have played multiple courses with this type of tee and they have always been nice. Dry, rain, and snow carpet is 100x better than gravel or grass. If you dont like the tee area, or carpet wears out it is easily moved and or removed.
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  #36  
Old 09-23-2011, 03:00 PM
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As much as many want to separate themselves from ball golf we could take a lesson from how they maintain their tee boxes. Build it bigger. Put the markers on one side, one quarter of the tee area if you will. Then move the markers every year, or perhaps every season depending on the use.

Of course this will not always work with established courses that have little room for expansion of the tee area.

Just a thought.
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  #37  
Old 09-23-2011, 03:29 PM
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it's easier to show you what NOT to do. There are two courses in my area with natural tees, both of which aren't good.

Old farm park in Kentwood has natural packed clay pads, but have multiple roots in multiple places that stick up from the pads. (no good pics online)

and Cascade Township Park which you can see the dirt strips that have been worn out, but in all truth are now deep ruts that present multiple tripping dangers.
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  #38  
Old 09-23-2011, 11:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simpletwist View Post
As much as many want to separate themselves from ball golf we could take a lesson from how they maintain their tee boxes. Build it bigger. Put the markers on one side, one quarter of the tee area if you will. Then move the markers every year, or perhaps every season depending on the use.

Of course this will not always work with established courses that have little room for expansion of the tee area.

Just a thought.
I like this idea in theory, but I am not sure it would work as well in dg. alot of holes have specific lines that the course designer wants people to have to throw or not be able to throw. A tee box has to be forward or backward 10 feet to open up a gap, or take away an overhand shot off the tee. moving the tee box can make a hole super hard, or easy.
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  #39  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:31 PM
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madman1101 madman1101 is offline
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The best course with natural tees was The Hill @ Northview Church, had moveable markers in the ground, when an area was starting to get rutted, they'd move the markers about 5-10 feet... the small move made a difference every time. and once the ground recovered, the tees could be moved again.
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  #40  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:40 PM
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DiscGolfer947 DiscGolfer947 is offline
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Winter Park's tees are the natural tees I've played on
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