#11  
Old 11-01-2011, 06:34 PM
kyledstauffer's Avatar
kyledstauffer kyledstauffer is offline
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Have you considered using plant material to make a "rough" that would cost players strokes? I'm thinking a very thick undergrowth of something thorny closely surrounding the hole on three sides such that a missed putt would likely wind up with a disc in the "rough" costing a stroke. (I'm a landscape architect, so plant material is the first thing to come to my mind!).

Also elevating the hole with a penalty, like a severe drop off, rough, or water feature on the other side would likely increase difficulty. Aiming higher should cause the disc to go farther on a miss.

p.s. not to thread jack, but I'd love to design courses...any idea how to get into that? I have two landscape design degrees and am looking for a job in the spring. Any help much appreciated!
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  #12  
Old 11-01-2011, 06:46 PM
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E_Rock25 E_Rock25 is offline
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kyledstauffer - try to find the course designers in your area and volunteer to help them, they will welcome you with open arms if you have access and knowledge of landscapeing. I got started by starting a league at Somerset this year and hearing people who wanted more. I contacted the city and they told me there was 13 more acre's that we could use to expand the course. The original course designer was helping me with the league and welcomed me to help with expansion. I then met Joe Feidt a DG hall of famer who liked the maps I had made for Somerset he asked me to help him with a new course he is working on. All of this happened this summer. The whole thing is getting bigger then I ever thought. I showed some interest in supporting the local DG scene and it just snowballed.

I hope you can find the same success we need passionate people in this sport.

Also read as many DG and Ball golf course design resources as you can.
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  #13  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:02 PM
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bradharris bradharris is offline
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A couple options: Using a slope, big drop-off, or water can cause some scary long putts. Reward goes to the players that find the right part of the green to get a less risky look. Another option with a similar result is to bracket the basket between two trees. This can kind of be gimicky since you have no "reward" option to go for it if you're in the wrong part of the green, but it does emphasize placement on the green. Just reaching it isn't enough.

The other thing to consider is making hitting the green tougher. Use of OB or trees can make hitting a good upshot as important as a good tee shot.
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  #14  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:14 PM
John Rock John Rock is offline
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Get some of the directional "Dr. Fred" baskets.
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  #15  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:18 PM
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kyledstauffer kyledstauffer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E_Rock25 View Post
kyledstauffer - try to find the course designers in your area and volunteer to help them, they will welcome you with open arms if you have access and knowledge of landscapeing. I got started by starting a league at Somerset this year and hearing people who wanted more. I contacted the city and they told me there was 13 more acre's that we could use to expand the course. The original course designer was helping me with the league and welcomed me to help with expansion. I then met Joe Feidt a DG hall of famer who liked the maps I had made for Somerset he asked me to help him with a new course he is working on. All of this happened this summer. The whole thing is getting bigger then I ever thought. I showed some interest in supporting the local DG scene and it just snowballed.

I hope you can find the same success we need passionate people in this sport.

Also read as many DG and Ball golf course design resources as you can.
Thanks E_rock I will see what I can do. I would love to get involved! Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about plant material/site grading, landscape stuff in general!
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  #16  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:56 PM
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harr0140 harr0140 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyledstauffer View Post
Thanks E_rock I will see what I can do. I would love to get involved! Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about plant material/site grading, landscape stuff in general!
Nice to see someone else with landscape experience getting involved in disc golf course design. I believe it is one of the things that will help take the course design to the next level. I have 18 years of experience in the green industry and i am just 36. All I have ever done in my life for work is outside either working for landscaping companies, working on private resorts and country clubs golf course maintenance, or now owning my own landscape business, so I think I have a lot of input into course design from a sustainability and maintenance perspective. I wish I knew more about construction but I can still learn those things as I get further into it.

I joined the DGCD disc golf designers group this past year just to get my name on their list (since the group doesnt do much right now) but that gets you on the listserve where you can discuss design ideas with the other people in the group. It is like any other listserv, sometimes it is busy sometimes it is really quiet, but there is good information to be had, and I am sure you can contribute something to the process too.

I have only volunteered my time at my home course (and basically have single handedly taken over any course work out there) but the parks people are pretty helpful so it doesnt require a ton from me. I have helped install a couple of practice courses in our area this summer, and am looking for that first opportunity to propose a course to someone. I have two already in mind, I just need some time this winter to come up with the best approach to talk to these people about seasonal courses (one golf course (in the winter) and one ski hill (in the summer)).

If anyone else interested in disc golf course design check out that DGCD group and maybe join up, but I welcome course design discussions anytime.

Erock I will let you know when I am able to make it up to MN either over the winter or early in the spring and maybe I can walk the property with you!
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  #17  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:57 PM
joesouthfla joesouthfla is offline
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I played a course not to long ago that had a pretty open basket on level ground but behind it was a small bunker/ditch. If you missed your put the return put was not that easy. I also like baskets that are surrounded with bushes or trees and branches that make you have to putt from one knee it you miss the narrow openings. Try to avoid gimmicky holes. I hate the ones that are hanging up in a tree or on top of a stump and you have to use a ladder to get the disc.
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  #18  
Old 11-01-2011, 08:00 PM
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birdman101 birdman101 is offline
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Here is one of the more difficult greens in the area around me



I plan to take some more pictures at some point but this will have to do. The basket is circled in red and sits on top of a berm so you usually have an uphill putt but if you miss you may have another uphill putt. I have seen people go back and forth over the top of the berm multiple times before laying up.

putting the basket on the side of a hill is always an option too. We have that situation on #9 at mccauley park in nixa its a big hill with the basket maybe 3/4 of the way up and the hill slopes left to right off when looking at it from the tee.
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  #19  
Old 11-01-2011, 08:20 PM
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Norcal Norcal is offline
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I'm all for making disc golf putting more challenging and I appreciate sloping greens. That said, there's such a thing as too much slope. I've seen baskets placed on the face of severely sloping hills without any available landing area (Skyline Wilderness, Napa, Ca). When the slope is too extreme, luck becomes too much of a factor because a good shot may roll away while a bad one may stick. A well-designed hole will provide a reasonably flat, amply-sized landing area close to the basket.
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  #20  
Old 11-01-2011, 08:46 PM
bombmk bombmk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal View Post
I'm all for making disc golf putting more challenging and I appreciate sloping greens. That said, there's such a thing as too much slope. I've seen baskets placed on the face of severely sloping hills without any available landing area (Skyline Wilderness, Napa, Ca). When the slope is too extreme, luck becomes too much of a factor because a good shot may roll away while a bad one may stick. A well-designed hole will provide a reasonably flat, amply-sized landing area close to the basket.
Basically this. How a disc rolls away is already exposed to a reasonable degree of random circumstance. Should be very careful not to add more too it. Adding a feature that hurts a missed 10 feet putt as much as 50 feet one would be a travesty (assuming an average miss on the same scale ofc.).
Risk/reward should not be confused with a roll of the dice.

As far as objects go the PDGA guidelines say the following:
"There should not be too many objects within 33 ft (10m) of each
target. An object near the target should never be so large that a player cannot find an unobstructed flight path by stretching sideways, throwing from a low stance, throwing through or over the top of the object."

http://www.pdga.com/files/documents/...Guides2011.pdf

That being said, I don't think I have seen many holes with a 10m completely clear circle, and I have seen very few I thought was unfair. And a lot don't even have a 3-4m clear circle.
All depends on the way there too, though. If the lines from the tee/fairway are already challenging, there should be little lottery in placement inside the circle. On the other hand, if the approach is clear it does not hurt to have some obstacles on the side/back to put some pressure on it.
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