#41  
Old 11-02-2011, 01:14 AM
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Norcal Norcal is offline
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Originally Posted by Dave242 View Post
I guess what I am proposing is basically the equivalent of a golf sand trap - a device that forces you to execute a different sort of shot to recover from a less-than-ideal upshot (or drive).
I think a modified fence could serve well as a bunker. Here's another example at 50:00:

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The result would be better with fences designed specifically for a given hole- various heights, lengths, shapes and slat configurations. The fence wouldn't completely obstruct certain putts, but it would make them more difficult by forcing shots to go over, through, around or under. Shaped hedges could serve the same purpose, but maintenance would be greater and discs would get lodged.
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  #42  
Old 11-02-2011, 02:53 AM
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Paging Stan McDaniel, paging Stan McDaniel.
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  #43  
Old 11-02-2011, 03:32 AM
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Suunyside Grange in the above video...IMO 10 is far more interesting than 9...I loved putting out around the bushes

Trees, obstacles, boulders, structures around the basket add a ton of fun and challenge to a green....there is nothing wrong with a basket in a jail of trees, behind a wall, between boulders, elevated, or near a slope. I can think of countless examples of such greens.
There seems to be quite a bunch of debate regarding Stan McDaniel and the Charlotte Baskets. I tend to think the side of the fence you are on is based on whether or not you are hitting putts that day.
Why would we want thorns and schule like vegetation near the basket????? that's stupid...I always felt thorns and difficult schule should be removed from the disc golf course....to put such punishment near a basket seems a serious flaw
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  #44  
Old 11-02-2011, 03:50 AM
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Something some designers always seem to forget or not be aware of especially those with a traditional ball golf background:

we are not ball golf....not even remotely close to ball golf. Our hole is suspended in the air (basket is not in the ground like a ball golf hole) Our disc moves through the air and is not rolling on the ground.....therefore we have far more options to make a green interesting. Obstacles to move around and between are the equivalent of the undulating ball golf green. A dense bunch of trees or a large boulder or structure that requires a difficult shot out are our punishing ball golf sand trap. A steep slope acts just like a sloped green in ball golf....tempting you to go for it or play safe and lay up. We can also put baskets close to water, elevate them, block off access from one angle, and countless other creative things that influence the way you approach the basket......quite simply we have more options than ball golf and should embrace that.

I can't understand why players think ball golf greens are more interesting....it's not really the case with the courses I play....maybe I am spoiled.
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  #45  
Old 11-02-2011, 03:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscoe View Post
absolute balderdash...
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  #46  
Old 11-02-2011, 08:03 AM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is offline
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Stoneyhill has steep slopes, close-by O.B., trees inside the circle, or elevated baskets on almost every hole---often in exciting combinations. The one safe green really throws off my game.

One other factor sometimes is available is an open hilltop green in places subject to a lot of wind.

I think you can separate challenging greens into various categories:

---Harder to make the putt. Most often trees inside the circle, but also elevated baskets and perhaps tricky footing.

---Consequences of missed putts. Steep slopes, where even a putt that falls out of the chains may roll away.

---Risk/Reward, with a pucker factor in deciding whether to run at the basket or lay up. O.B. behind the basket, big downhill putts, etc.

A variety of these situations on a given course can be fun. Too much of any particular feature, not so much. Think before putting all baskets on slopes, or all near O.B., or all different heights, or all with lots of trees on the green.
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  #47  
Old 11-02-2011, 08:45 AM
BradC BradC is offline
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I think using natural terrain is the best option.

As linked earlier, #10 at Jordan Creek.



#1 and #9 at Sellersville...





Also, using trees to shield the basket to make only a certain part of the green "puttable" works nice...

Hole 14, C2 at Tyler...

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  #48  
Old 11-02-2011, 08:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E_Rock25 View Post
I am thinking about sand traps that are pee rock that make footing an issue.
i don't think these will have as much effect as you might think... there is a sand trap on hole 10 at blockhouse that was put in for this reason but the shot in question isn't really long enough that the best footing is that much of a concern... if you land on the steeply sloped side of it footing does suck but i don't know that that is an aspect i would want to bring into play on a public course for safety reasons...

ornamental grasses would be something i would consider to liven up otherwise open greens- not a full vertical obstacle like a tree but broader so it forces you to alter your shot to more of a lob rather than a direct putt, also more scenic than a fence...

ironically enough the baskets i have historically had the most trouble putting on tend to be in the wide open due to lack of perspective...
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  #49  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:08 AM
John Rock John Rock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscoe View Post
i don't think these will have as much effect as you might think... there is a sand trap on hole 10 at blockhouse that was put in for this reason but the shot in question isn't really long enough that the best footing is that much of a concern... if you land on the steeply sloped side of it footing does suck but i don't know that that is an aspect i would want to bring into play on a public course for safety reasons...

ornamental grasses would be something i would consider to liven up otherwise open greens- not a full vertical obstacle like a tree but broader so it forces you to alter your shot to more of a lob rather than a direct putt, also more scenic than a fence...

ironically enough the baskets i have historically had the most trouble putting on tend to be in the wide open due to lack of perspective...


Very good point. Many times when stuck behind or in a tree, the player focuses on a certain branch or window and thinks, "All I have to do is flip it over that branch and it'll go in..."
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  #50  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:54 AM
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how about beach balls on ropes that swing back and forth in front of the basket... yea i know, not realistic. but how awesome would that be.

a more realistic suggestion would be incorporating trees such as willows, where the trunk of the tree could be not really in the way but the low hanging thin limbs would pose a problem, they wouldn't stop a disc being so thin but could slightly alter its path if not avoided.

Last edited by New013; 11-02-2011 at 09:58 AM.
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