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Old 12-06-2016, 04:30 PM
Dana Dana is offline
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Default Tree Planting and Course Design

Hypothetical situation- you've got a wide open field and need to include a few holes here. What kind of trees/bushes/etc are you planting? These would more so be future obstacles vs. beautifying the park/course.

What kind of tree would you plant for beautifying the course (aka a tree that doesn't come in to play, but is there to add beauty to the course/park)?

Any particular kind to stay away from?

Any general tree planting tips or advise?
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Old 12-06-2016, 04:51 PM
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Something that grows fast, and is suitable to your climate and region. The answer is different, everywhere.

If the trees are close to the tee, something with hard bark, or dense foliage, so it's not damaged by bark strikes.

Here, my first choice would be tulip poplars---fast growing, straight, attractive, and native.
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Old 12-06-2016, 05:18 PM
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Terry Calhoun should be able to help you, easily found on FB.

I know enough to say I don't know enough.
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
Something that grows fast, and is suitable to your climate and region. The answer is different, everywhere..
Big time. The answer can change within a few hundred feet given impact of roots or available water soil compositions and maintenance availability etc...
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:31 PM
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Depending on the situation, you might check with the parks department. I recall when we were planting trees at Earlewood, and they vetoed one choice.

Mike Harrington is on DGCR (can't recall his DGCR name at the moment), and I'm pretty sure he's a landscaper, a little north of you. You might track him down, if he doesn't show up here on his own.

The choice for beautifying an open area is vast, as you can see by yards and garden centers. Most trees and shrubs like open sunshine. The choice for the course is restricted a bit, but still pretty wide.

Two tips, from a private course owner:

(1) Trees grow slowly. Unless you have a huge budget, you'll be planting smaller trees that won't be effective obstacles for 5 or 10 years.

(2) Trees grow out, as well as up. Keep in mind the eventual canopy width, or you'll create problems down the road.
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:45 PM
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Get staghorn sumac underway as a great DG fairway boundary hazard.
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:50 PM
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Leyland cypress around here.
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Old 12-06-2016, 09:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscoe View Post
Leyland cypress around here.
Around here too--I dare say they'd do well in most parts of the country except maybe arid/semi-arid environments. Fast growing, dense foliage, and readily available. They are sometimes discouraged for home plantings because they grow too big, too fast and can outgrow their space. Obviously, that's not a problem for most disc golf courses. I think they're probably about the best bet in terms of having a good barrier/obstacle in a relatively short time.
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Old 12-06-2016, 10:38 PM
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Leyland Cypresses don't do too well in the Southeast, where they're subject to a disease.

Otherwise, they're excellent for fast growth and dense foliage. More of a hedge than a shade tree. They have a formal appearance, so depending on the setting they can look very good, or out of place.
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Old 12-06-2016, 10:40 PM
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A generic caution: Many fast-growing trees are also weak, dropping limbs, splitting, or dying young. It's the price you pay for speed. Not all of them, but buy with caution.
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