#1  
Old Yesterday, 11:37 AM
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duckychucky duckychucky is offline
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2 tee 2 basket ?

The only course I have played with 2 tees and 2 baskets on each hole (blackfalls vt, my fav all time course) had the layout as short tee to short basket= red, short to long=white, long to short=blue and long to long=gold. So for the most part, the distance (and difficulty) between tees was more than the distance between baskets, so that blue was longer than white. However on some holes the basket positions had the greater difference so the white layout was longer.

Is this the norm for dual tee dual basket courses?

Or do some courses have the distance between baskets greater than distance between tees so that blue layout is short to long and white is long to short?

Do any course mix it up so that if you are playing blue some times you are long to short and other holes short to long, whichever happens to be greater?

This last option would make the most sense on hilly courses where choices for tee positions may be limited due to terrain, but it would also be the most confusing.

Just curious...
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  #2  
Old Yesterday, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duckychucky View Post
Is this the norm for dual tee dual basket courses?
There is no standard or norm.

Well done dual-tee/dual-basket courses (Black Falls definitely falls in this category) will present very different layouts so that each of the four ways to play a hole is unique. It's not just about making sure one layout is always longer than the other. And sometimes, the shorter configuration can be a tougher shot than the longer.

Generally what you find as a good rule of thumb is that the long tee to long basket is the toughest (gold level) layout, short to short is the easiest (red level) and the two intermediate layouts give you the option of where you want to be challenged. The long tees will challenge you more on your tee shot while the long pins will make finding the green more challenging.
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  #3  
Old Yesterday, 12:03 PM
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duckychucky duckychucky is offline
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I'm a fan of designing to the pdga par guidelines and think that a layout that blue and white flip flop, short to long, long to short, makes the most sense, so that blue is always the harder and both layouts get some of the harder greens and some of the harder tees. just probably too confusing for most players unless you had detailed "next tee" signs that showed where to go for all four color layouts.
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Old Yesterday, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by duckychucky View Post
I'm a fan of designing to the pdga par guidelines and think that a layout that blue and white flip flop, short to long, long to short, makes the most sense, so that blue is always the harder and both layouts get some of the harder greens and some of the harder tees. just probably too confusing for most players unless you had detailed "next tee" signs that showed where to go for all four color layouts.
I had to read this a couple times, but I think I get what you're saying. Essentially, you want, on every hole, for the blue layout to be longer than the white. So on a hole-by-hole basis, the longer between the short-to-long and long-to-short is the blue layout.

It's doable for sure. Maple Hill does a great job of communicating the various layouts. I'm not sure if blue is always longer than white, but it's certainly possible.

I don't really think there's a right or wrong way to do it. In the case of Blackfalls or Borderland, I don't think anyone really thinks of the layouts as "blue" or "white." They're simply "short-to-long" or "long-to-short." Whereas Maple Hill clearly defines colored layouts with tees and baskets all over the place.
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  #5  
Old Yesterday, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by bradharris View Post
I had to read this a couple times, but I think I get what you're saying. Essentially, you want, on every hole, for the blue layout to be longer than the white. So on a hole-by-hole basis, the longer between the short-to-long and long-to-short is the blue layout.
Exactly. You said it better than me. Although, i would make the exception on a couple holes when the shorter layout is the harder shot of the 2, than it should be the blue.
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  #6  
Old Yesterday, 05:01 PM
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Distance isn't the only factor. Don't forget factoring in OB, dog legs, elevation, fast greens, and other hazzards. That is why some "shorter" hole configurations may breach into a tougher color code. It's rare, but it does happen.

Edit: for some reason when i read the OP, the previous replies did not show up.

Last edited by jrawk; Yesterday at 05:04 PM.
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  #7  
Old Yesterday, 05:03 PM
Billipo Billipo is offline
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I like two tees to vary distance. Two pins with one having a trickier green. Could be more protected or potential for run away on misses. Difficulty isn't all about distance. Configure like Warwick ...color to color.
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  #8  
Old Today, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Billipo View Post
I like two tees to vary distance. Two pins with one having a trickier green. Could be more protected or potential for run away on misses. Difficulty isn't all about distance. Configure like Warwick ...color to color.
Just looking at Warwicks scorecard reinforces what I'm talking about. Sometimes the difernce in tees is greater and sometimes the difference in baskets is greater so that the difference in length of long to short (lime green?) verses short to long(purple?) is only 60 ft, 6,727ft vs 6,787ft. If it was layed out so that the longer of the two was one layout and the shorter the other you would get 7,164 ft and 6,350 ft layouts that would each get to play some of the harder tees and some of the harder greens. That 814 ft difference isnt huge, but averages 45 ft per hole. For some players that could make the difference between having to hit a long putt or a gimme layup extra stroke (NAGS).

Of course you could play any layout you want casually, but having the course officially set up to make a bigger difference in the middle layouts would give more players an opportunity to play a course that is designed for their skill level.
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Old Today, 08:20 AM
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Oops double post

Last edited by duckychucky; Today at 08:21 AM. Reason: double post
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  #10  
Old Today, 08:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duckychucky View Post
Of course you could play any layout you want casually, but having the course officially set up to make a bigger difference in the middle layouts would give more players an opportunity to play a course that is designed for their skill level.
The problem with this approach is that not all designers are intentionally trying to differentiate skill levels with the middle layouts. In many cases, it could simply be that they're making use of two natural pin locations and then putting in a pair of tees that give some interesting looks at the hole.

Keep in mind that disc golf course designers have to let the land dictate the layout to an extent. It's not like ball golf where significant landscaping is done to create a course.

Because of the nature of our game compared to ball golf, our course designers get a lot of freedom to be very creative in how they set up a course. I would hate to see that creativity stifled by trying to hit specific distance benchmarks.
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