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Old 04-14-2016, 06:06 AM
BCDan BCDan is offline
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Default Homeowners near course demand removal of hole...

So, a couple local homeowners bordering our local course are upset about hole #5 being too close. I've already moved it once, and so it's now 100+ feet away from any fence line.

Here is youtube video of hole #5 and a map.
https://youtu.be/IKwV3TEDoSU?t=1m28s



Allegedly the homeowners are upset about people throwing their discs in their yards, but in 200 games playing , I've never seen anybody throw into a yard for hole #4. For Hole #5, under old design when basket was 65 feet away, I did see it happen a couple times.

I think the real reason is, they feel like they owned the park and never saw anyone they .didn't know near their fence line. In fact, they told me multiple times, they bought their houses by the park because they never expected it to actually be utilized by the general public.

I took hole #5 basket out until I can get signage, or come up with a solution, just to show the city that we respect concerns, and will evaluate options.

I've thought about putting the basket back, but adding a MANDO post 80 feet from the fence line and/or an OB line 30 feet from their fence line to further dissuade shots anywhere near the fence line. That would be considered due diligence I believe.
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Last edited by BCDan; 04-14-2016 at 06:09 AM.
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  #2  
Old 04-14-2016, 07:46 AM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is online now
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I can't watch the video, but looking at the map, I'm on the homeowners' side.

A mando has limited effect. Players aren't obligated to obey it, and even when they do, bad throws that miss the mando continue to fly in the unwanted direction.

If a course is open to the public, there are going to be some players making simply awful throws, and a few players who will feel entitled to retrieving their discs, no matter where they go.

Regardless of the homeowners' motivations---or, perhaps, mixed motivations---you need to make it almost impossible for discs to land in their yards. They may be unreasonably possessive of the park, but they're not of their own property.
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Old 04-14-2016, 07:51 AM
JC17393 JC17393 is offline
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I'd recommend finding out if there are any city officials/employees (council member, committee member, parks dept, etc) who would be willing to come to the park on a busy day and observe the hole for a couple hours, just to observe how it is played and how frequently or how close discs come near the neighboring yards. Basically let them make their observations and form their own conclusions about whether the homeowners have a legitimate case or they're just making things up because they don't want traffic in that part of the park.

The mando and/or OB is a nice gesture that will look good to the city and all, but I think we all know that many players will ignore those things if it doesn't suit them (or if they're hackers who don't know the rules anyway). So in the long run, they're not going to be much of a solution if players are truly throwing close to or into the neighbors' yards.

Maybe the best solution is for the park to build a privacy fence on the property line...something that can block errant shots, dissuade anyone from climbing over, and will also keep players out of view of these folks trying to enjoy their home and yard. Or maybe a tall hedge row?
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Old 04-14-2016, 08:28 AM
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Reniger Reniger is offline
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While I agree the homeowners may be overzealous in their voiced concern, I can also see their issue. Plenty of our local courses are close to homes and other property and I've had a few run-ins with annoyed neighbors. Including one with a guy at a newly planted course sporting a shot gun "protecting his land from all the trespassers." I kindly and respectfully thanked him for letting me know it was private property and said I would inform everyone I could and suggested he post signs for private property. This was just a tree-line behind a small creek. No implication that it wasn't part of the already heavily wooded park.

Anyway, David is right. You cannot protect from errant throws, high winds pushing discs over, or people then trespassing to retrieve their discs. The video looks like there's plenty of room to compensate, but we've all had days where we release too early or too high and discs wind up where we'd never expect them. From your map, it looks like there may be room for a hole between 1 and 2, over the creek. However, that would likely interfere with 2's fairway. Hard to tell distances from that map. Even moving 5's teepad right next to 3's. It'd make for a very short hole, but it keeps people further from the housing.

TL;DR - If we were all pros, not a big deal. But there's no protection from errant throws. Best to avoid the possible confrontations. My 2
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Old 04-14-2016, 08:29 AM
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filobedo filobedo is offline
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Be proactive and have a discussion with a member of the HOA for a compromise or ask to visit an HOA meeting if allowable. It should not be difficult to find out when they have meetings if you ask some one other than the pissed off neighbors. I learned after being on our HOA BOD that sometimes committees deal with ridiculous requests and tend to agree with the level headed party and compromise. The craziest example for me was when a homeowner came to the open forum part of HOA meeting and wanted us to not allow his next door neighbors children to play basketball in front of their home during certain hours of the day because he liked to sit on his porch and read. Immediately it popped into everyone's mind that the children were playing late in the evening. The guy then was asked what time this was going on and he replied between 3pm and 6pm. Immediately the HOA members thought this was a joke but this guy was serious. If any of the neighbors or their children play you should have a case to keep this and possibly expand the course. Also think about a disc golf clinic for the neighborhood with a few players instructing and giving each attendee a player to teach them the sport but make sure it is well organized. Communication is key to solve problems.

Last edited by filobedo; 04-14-2016 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 04-14-2016, 08:44 AM
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mark996 mark996 is offline
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Fast growing, closely placed cedar trees. We used them for a property line before the city bought the adjacent property, they catch discs extremely well. If they're a part of an HOA, they'll likely bitch about blocking views, or about any other numerous things for the sake of bitching...but hopefully not. Wooden privacy fence may help too...looks like most of the homes there have chain link fences in the back yard, if the city came in and put up a fence just off the homes fence line, it may help keep people from at least going in to their yards to get discs.

They have a right to complain about discs/people getting in to their yard...and the city/golfers need to do everything they can to prevent that. With homeowners in the area, its best to be as civil as possible and come up with a timely resolution to the problem. One or two holes creating an issue may turn in to a bigger problem for the other holes if the city steps in and does something without conferring with course designers/local golfers.
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Old 04-14-2016, 08:53 AM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JC17393 View Post
I'd recommend finding out if there are any city officials/employees (council member, committee member, parks dept, etc) who would be willing to come to the park on a busy day and observe the hole for a couple hours, just to observe how it is played and how frequently or how close discs come near the neighboring yards. Basically let them make their observations and form their own conclusions about whether the homeowners have a legitimate case or they're just making things up because they don't want traffic in that part of the park.
The weakness here is that it could be only 1 disc a week. If I were a homeowner, that might be enough to bother me up. But a few hours of monitoring may not see that one disc.
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Old 04-14-2016, 08:56 AM
TimSyl TimSyl is offline
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How about moving the #5 tee, play to the #6 basket, and turn the 12 hole course into an 11 hole course?????
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Old 04-14-2016, 09:13 AM
Gblambert Gblambert is offline
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Remove hole #5, move the hole #6 tee pad to the right, make a new hole that throws from the #7 tee pad across the creek to a basket located at the bottom of the mowed area, then reverse the tee and basket locations on hole #10.
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  #10  
Old 04-14-2016, 09:18 AM
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Aim For The Chains Aim For The Chains is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
I can't watch the video, but looking at the map, I'm on the homeowners' side.

A mando has limited effect. Players aren't obligated to obey it, and even when they do, bad throws that miss the mando continue to fly in the unwanted direction.

If a course is open to the public, there are going to be some players making simply awful throws, and a few players who will feel entitled to retrieving their discs, no matter where they go.

Regardless of the homeowners' motivations---or, perhaps, mixed motivations---you need to make it almost impossible for discs to land in their yards. They may be unreasonably possessive of the park, but they're not of their own property.
Yep.
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