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Old 03-10-2014, 11:18 AM
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Thumber Thumber is offline
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Ticks

Over the last few years we have seen an alarming growth in the tick population here in eastern Ontario. I don't ever remember these things being in the woods when I was a kid.

Apparently the Black-Legged Tick (which is the Lyme disease vector) is now in the area. Great....

Just wondering how those of you who deal with these nasty creatures regularly prepare for and prevent them.

The thought of having to wear long pants and socks over pants sounds awful. We only get 6 weeks of nice weather here as it is.
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:22 AM
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bradharris bradharris is offline
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Just be vigilant. If you find and remove ticks quickly enough, they won't cause you any problems. I believe they need to be attached for about 24 hours before there's any risk of lyme. So if you make sure to check yourself after spending time in the woods, you should be okay.

Also keep a watch on your gear. A tick could easily get onto/into your bag and get to you or your pets after you bring it into the house.

Again, just be vigilant. Do a little research to educate yourself, and take appropriate actions to stay safe.
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:28 AM
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Kodachrome Kodachrome is online now
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Exactly. As much as I hate ticks (man they're freaky little buggers) I still play most of my rounds with no shirt, just shorts and vibram five fingers. As soon as a tick is on me I know it and I take it off. Even though it may seem counter intuitive I actually feel more aware and they are less likely to sneak up into the hiding spots they seem to favor before I catch them. As long as you check yo self after rounds you'll be golden.
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:28 AM
pmorgan1214 pmorgan1214 is offline
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Repellents play an integral part in your personal protection strategy. Repellents containing DEET are not sufficient to protect against tick bites. DEET only repels ticks to areas where they could bite and even that little protection does not last long. PERMETHRIN kills ticks on contact. Clothing only repellents that contain Permethrin are very effective and provide long-lasting protection. The best protection you can achieve is by using a repellent that contains Permethrin on your clothes and one that contains DEET for your skin.

pulled this from tick encounter resource center. some good advice.


also for the clothes.


What you wear when working or playing could reduce your chances of tick bites. Remember: Ticks start LOW and crawl UP; ticks do not jump, fly or drop from trees, they are down on the ground and crawl up until they find a good spot to attach. Tucking pant legs into socks is a good way to keep ticks on the outside where they may be seen or get brushed off.

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Old 03-10-2014, 11:30 AM
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MrFixIt MrFixIt is offline
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I keep a small bottle (aerosol) of DeepWoods OFF. Has a higher DEET content than the other bug sprays...
I spray my shoes/socks, stool legs and the bottom/back of my bag.
Nasty little buggers...
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:53 AM
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Thumber Thumber is offline
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Thanks for the advice.

Permethrin is pretty nasty stuff. I don't think I would want to spray that on anything my skin will come into contact with. Not something I want stuck to bags or clothes either. Too much risk of kids getting into contact with it

Side Effects

Pyrethroids:
Inhalation: coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, runny or stuffy nose, chest pain, or difficulty breathing.

Skin contact: rash, itching, or blisters.

Long term effects: disrupts the endocrine system by mimicking the female hormone, estrogen, thus causing excessive estrogen levels in females. In human males, its estrogenizing (feminizing) effects include lowered sperm counts. In both, it can lead to the abnormal growth of breast tissue, leading to development of breasts in males and cancerous breast tissue in both male and females.

Neurotoxic effects include: tremors, incoordination, elevated body temperature, increased aggressive behavior, and disruption of learning. Laboratory tests suggest that permethrin is more acutely toxic to children than to adults.

Other: A known carcinogen. There is evidence that pyrethroids harm the thyroid gland. Causes chromosomal damage in hamsters and mice; deformities in amphibians; blood abnormalities in birds.
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:54 AM
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fritothedog fritothedog is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradharris View Post
Just be vigilant. If you find and remove ticks quickly enough, they won't cause you any problems. I believe they need to be attached for about 24 hours before there's any risk of lyme. So if you make sure to check yourself after spending time in the woods, you should be okay.

Also keep a watch on your gear. A tick could easily get onto/into your bag and get to you or your pets after you bring it into the house.

Again, just be vigilant. Do a little research to educate yourself, and take appropriate actions to stay safe.
I thought that the disease was transferred faster than that, maybe a different disease that they spread. Still, they often take awhile before they actually bite so be vigilant and remove any after a round. you will be just fine.
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:58 AM
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bradharris bradharris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fritothedog View Post
I thought that the disease was transferred faster than that, maybe a different disease that they spread. Still, they often take awhile before they actually bite so be vigilant and remove any after a round. you will be just fine.
From the CDC.

Quote:
In most cases, the tick must be attached for 36-48 hours or more before the Lyme disease bacterium can be transmitted.
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:58 AM
pmorgan1214 pmorgan1214 is offline
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Signs and Symptoms of Lyme Disease
If you had a tick bite, live in an area known for Lyme disease or have recently traveled to an area where it occurs, and observe any of these symptoms, you should seek medical attention!

Early localized stage (3-30 days post-tick bite)
•Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM)
•Fatigue, chills, fever, headache, muscle and joint aches, and swollen lymph nodes
Some people may get these general symptoms in addition to an EM rash, but in others, these general symptoms may be the only evidence of infection.

Some people get a small bump or redness at the site of a tick bite that goes away in 1-2 days, like a mosquito bite. This is not a sign that you have Lyme disease. However, ticks can spread other organisms that may cause a different type of rash. For example, Southern Tick-associated Rash Illness (STARI) causes a rash with a very similar appearance.

Erythema migrans (EM) or "bull's-eye" rash

Rash occurs in approximately 70-80% of infected persons1 and begins at the site of a tick bite after a delay of 3-30 days (average is about 7 days).
Rash gradually expands over a period of several days, and can reach up to 12 inches (30 cm) across. Parts of the rash may clear as it enlarges, resulting in a “bull's-eye” appearance.
Rash usually feels warm to the touch but is rarely itchy or painful.
EM lesions may appear on any area of the body.

Early disseminated stage (days to weeks post-tick bite)
Untreated, the infection may spread from the site of the bite to other parts of the body, producing an array of specific symptoms that may come and go, including:

•Additional EM lesions in other areas of the body
•Facial or Bell's palsy (loss of muscle tone on one or both sides of the face)
•Severe headaches and neck stiffness due to meningitis (inflammation of the spinal cord)
•Pain and swelling in the large joints (such as knees)
•Shooting pains that may interfere with sleep
•Heart palpitations and dizziness due to changes in heartbeat
Many of these symptoms will resolve over a period of weeks to months, even without treatment2.However, lack of treatment can result in additional complications, described below.

Bell's (facial) palsy
Loss of muscle tone on one or both sides of the face is called facial or “Bell's” palsy.

Late disseminated stage (months-to-years post-tick bite)
Approximately 60% of patients with untreated infection may begin to have intermittent bouts of arthritis, with severe joint pain and swelling. Large joints are most often affected, particularly the knees3. Arthritis caused by Lyme disease manifests differently than other causes of arthritis and must be distinguished from arthralgias (pain, but not swelling, in joints).

Up to 5% of untreated patients may develop chronic neurological complaints months to years after infection4. These include shooting pains, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, and problems with short-term memory.

Arthritis
Pain and swelling in the large joints (such as knees) can occur.

Lingering symptoms after treatment (post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome)
Approximately 10-20% of patients with Lyme disease have symptoms that last months to years after treatment with antibiotics5. These symptoms can include muscle and joint pains, cognitive defects, sleep disturbance, or fatigue. The cause of these symptoms is not known, but there is no evidence that these symptoms are due to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi. This condition is referred to as Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). There is some evidence that PTLDS is caused by an autoimmune response, in which a person's immune system continues to respond, doing damage to the body’s tissues, even after the infection has been cleared. Studies have shown that continuing antibiotic therapy is not helpful and can be harmful for persons with PTLDS.

some info on lyme disease.
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  #10  
Old 03-10-2014, 12:10 PM
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Use 95% deet Deep woods off. Not everyone carries it. You have to look for it.
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