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Old 08-26-2014, 04:48 PM
shep proudfoot shep proudfoot is offline
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Short tees vs long tees for practice?

I don't know if this has been discussed before, but here goes. I play a lot of rounds by myself at my local course. Each hole has long and short teepads and baskets. I usually just play short to short and shoot around -1 to -3 (mostly 3's, a few birdies and the occasional 4). I occasionally play long to long (I did today) and just get my ass kicked (a few 3's, lots of 4's and 5's, sometimes 6's). It's borderline demeaning. I was wondering what people think is more beneficial for practice rounds; shooting under par short to short or getting walloped long to long?
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:04 PM
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bradharris bradharris is offline
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Mix it up. You don't need to do the same practice every day. Each set of tees will help you focus on different aspects of your game. The shorts can help prepare you for those deuce-or-die holes that give you scoring opportunities while the longs give you more opportunity to practice scrambling and throwing from less than ideal lies.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:08 PM
coupe coupe is offline
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A) It's only demeaning if you allow it to be;

B) if your goal is to improve, don't practice the things you do well; practice the things you DON'T do well;

C) depends on what your goal is: if it's to stroke your ego by shooting par or close to par, play the shorts; if it's to step up your game, play the longs; if it's to work on a specific shot, technique, or hitting a particular line, play the tees and baskets that provide the most opportunites to practice it, regardless of their position; if it's to hone in your skills for a tournament or league round, play the layout you're going to be competing on.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:09 PM
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sandman365 sandman365 is offline
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Guess it depends what you're working on, but its more beneficial to your game to play the longer locations since it may demand distance and a wider variety of shots.

And since you're playing solo, the score doesn't matter much and it's basically practice.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:13 PM
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Tfire25 Tfire25 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coupe View Post
A) It's only demeaning if you allow it to be;

B) if your goal is to improve, don't practice the things you do well; practice the things you DON'T do well;

C) depends on what your goal is: if it's to stroke your ego by shooting par or close to par, play the shorts; if it's to step up your game, play the longs; if it's to work on a specific shot, technique, or hitting a particular line, play the tees and baskets that provide the most opportunites to practice it, regardless of their position; if it's to hone in your skills for a tournament or league round, play the layout you're going to be competing on.
Qft

Practice the long tees until you go under par from them.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:23 PM
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mashnut mashnut is offline
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I would be wary of answers like "play longs" or "play shorts". You need to look at your own game and at what tees are the most appropriate level of challenge for you. The holes that are the best for practice are the ones that you have a pretty good chance to birdie if you execute the best you can, and punish you if you miss your line or don't have a great shot. Throwing holes that leave you with short upshots every time because they're 50' longer than your max controlled distance isn't going to help you a whole lot, you should either play holes that are barely reachable or that leave you a second shot that challenges you. That might mean playing some mix of long and short tees and pins to find the right shots to test your skills. Make sure that mix includes a bunch of different line shaping skills too if possible, don't let yourself choose mostly hyzer holes if you're already better at that.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:26 PM
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Hampstead Hampstead is online now
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Maybe go odds/evens to mix things up. Play all the odd holes from the longs and the even holes from the shorts. Next time do the opposite. Forget about your score for a few rounds and try to find incremental improvement in your game. If it's all about your ego, play every hole as a par 23 and feel great as you crush the course.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:30 PM
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Toro71 Toro71 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
The holes that are the best for practice are the ones that you have a pretty good chance to birdie if you execute the best you can, and punish you if you miss your line or don't have a great shot. Throwing holes that leave you with short upshots every time because they're 50' longer than your max controlled distance isn't going to help you a whole lot, you should either play holes that are barely reachable or that leave you a second shot that challenges you.
I was leaning toward the longs, but this is a good point. And really, a lot of what should be considered "practice" should probably be field work, repeating all kinds of lines over and over. Use the long tees/baskets more as a yardstick to see if/how much D you're adding, etc. (This is if you're goal is really primarily becoming a better golfer.)
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:41 PM
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zugthug1705 zugthug1705 is offline
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My local course plays as 18 or 27 holes...I can usually shoot -7 or better on the 18, but the 27 usually kicks my butt and I'm lucky to break even. I have friends who will avoid playing the 27 because their scores are discouraging but that means they never really get better at playing the course. My advice is maybe play a little safer to try to turn your 5's into 4's, 4's into 3's, etc. But remember that once you finish a hole, put it behind you. You'll become better over time by challenging yourself and finding new ways to approach different looks the course might throw at you.
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  #10  
Old 08-26-2014, 05:44 PM
shep proudfoot shep proudfoot is offline
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Thanks for the responses guys. It's not really a matter of my ego... But what would be appropriate to play for my skill level. You wouldn't send a first time ball golfer to a par 5 course. Now I've been playing for about a year and consider myself an intermediate player (just played my first tourney, came in 5th in int). I do a lot of field work as well. I like the idea of doing a mix of longs and shorts to work on different lines.
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