#1  
Old 08-15-2012, 12:40 PM
BradC BradC is offline
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Mastering longer putts.

I need help on the "best" way to practice draining longer putts, say in the 40'-60' range.

Conventional wisdom is to train your brain to get used to making putts, by putting at ranges you can make.

When doing this, missing the aiming point by a set amount at shorter distances will many times still allow the putt to go in. However, missing by the same deviation at longer distances however, will equate to a sizable miss.

If you practice at shorter ranges, and focus more on less deviation from the aiming point vs. just being happy making the putt, will this translate to making more longer putts? If not, how do you work on longer putts without missing a ton and killing confidence?
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:46 PM
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chrishysell chrishysell is offline
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I'm always confident but my key is not to let a missed putt affect me
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:17 PM
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jmhoekst jmhoekst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrishysell View Post
I'm always confident but my key is not to let a missed putt affect me
This. I've seen people who hang their head on missed 60' putts and it kills the rest of their round. Then, after the round, they talk about how they missed 10 putts. Well, 9 of those were 40' or longer.

Anything outside the circle I view as a bonus putt. If I make it, great. If not, who cares, it was a bonus anyway!

One specific thing I tend to focus on for longer putts is to make sure my technique doesn't result in 3-putting. It's great to go for it from 60' away, but make sure that if you whiff, you don't have a 30' comeback. 3-putting is far worse than only making 1/10 from 50'.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:23 PM
BradC BradC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmhoekst View Post
This. I've seen people who hang their head on missed 60' putts and it kills the rest of their round. Then, after the round, they talk about how they missed 10 putts. Well, 9 of those were 40' or longer.

Anything outside the circle I view as a bonus putt. If I make it, great. If not, who cares, it was a bonus anyway!

.
I agree fully with this. I don't let a missed longer putt in play kill my round.

What I meant about confidence is practicing for 10 minutes at 60' and only hitting a handful...I don't want that to translate to a round.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:25 PM
mjoyce mjoyce is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BradC View Post
I need help on the "best" way to practice draining longer putts, say in the 40'-60' range.

Conventional wisdom is to train your brain to get used to making putts, by putting at ranges you can make.

When doing this, missing the aiming point by a set amount at shorter distances will many times still allow the putt to go in. However, missing by the same deviation at longer distances however, will equate to a sizable miss.

If you practice at shorter ranges, and focus more on less deviation from the aiming point vs. just being happy making the putt, will this translate to making more longer putts? If not, how do you work on longer putts without missing a ton and killing confidence?
I think it would be important to work up to the longer distances. I.E. Worry about being 100% from 10 and 20 feet out before you start worrying about the 40,50,60 footers.

It's also important to not let going for the longer putts and missing in a round affect your mental game negatively as others have stated.

I found that my scores are much better now that I focus on getting my up shot within makable range than they were when I was trying to make puts that are out of my range. This range expands the better you get. But I think it would be key to ensure you're great a putting close before you move out too far.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:25 PM
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bcr123psu bcr123psu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BradC View Post
I need help on the "best" way to practice draining longer putts, say in the 40'-60' range.

Conventional wisdom is to train your brain to get used to making putts, by putting at ranges you can make.

When doing this, missing the aiming point by a set amount at shorter distances will many times still allow the putt to go in. However, missing by the same deviation at longer distances however, will equate to a sizable miss.

If you practice at shorter ranges, and focus more on less deviation from the aiming point vs. just being happy making the putt, will this translate to making more longer putts? If not, how do you work on longer putts without missing a ton and killing confidence?
Too bad you couldn't make the clinic at JC that Jay and Des did on Sunday. Jay covered this.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:26 PM
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McFer McFer is offline
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I've found that using different putters for long putts helps my frame of mind. I like my Pure better for long putts anyway, but if I'm missing with it the bad juju doesn't stick around when I've got a shorter putt with my Aviar. Pulling out the Aviar becomes comforting and confidence-building, because I rarely ever miss with it.
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  #8  
Old 08-15-2012, 01:42 PM
BradC BradC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjoyce View Post
I think it would be important to work up to the longer distances. I.E. Worry about being 100% from 10 and 20 feet out before you start worrying about the 40,50,60 footers.
I understand and can't disagree with this.

The problem I'm having is I am at the point where I have a few of these a round after my drive. Even if I made one or two, it would really help my scores having those two birdies vs. pars.

I don't let it get me down, and I don't feel they are "missed putts", but it's a part of my game that dissatisfies me. Example, last time I was out @ Jordan I shot a 62, with no missed putts inside the circle. If I hit two or three of the longer birdie looks I had, I would have set a personal best. Granted, I could have gotten close to my best had I not muffed two holes elsewhere, but in my eyes, that inconsistency is part of the game @ my level (mid-pack MA2).

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcr123psu View Post
Too bad you couldn't make the clinic at JC that Jay and Des did on Sunday. Jay covered this.
I really wish I could have Brian, but my fiancee was in a wedding the night before out of town and we stayed.

What were his suggestions?
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:49 PM
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ZDotHalbach ZDotHalbach is offline
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I like to go for it half heartedly but going for it but making sure I don't leave myself with another 40 footer
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  #10  
Old 08-15-2012, 01:52 PM
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DiscJunkie DiscJunkie is offline
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1. Have heard it said that Ken Climo considers anything outside of 25' a "bonus". This is great for 2 reasons:
If you make it outside of 25', then you get a lift.
If you miss it outside of 25', then no bad feelings.
2. My advice is to relax and figure out a way to get it to the basket "area" with the least amount of effort and then practice and work on accuracy.
3. Work on being able to relax and get it to the basket, then work on accuracy, not the other way around.
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