#1  
Old 10-20-2014, 10:52 PM
greg_b_4 greg_b_4 is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Princeton WV
Years Playing: 2.4
Courses Played: 35
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 149
disc golf club question

I didn't know where this question would fit so I stuck it here. I recently designed, built, and installed a course in a local city park which opened first of July. I did 95% of all of that by myself and all voluntarily. I have yet to run any kind of event and was wanting to run one in the next couple of weeks. When I spoke to the park manager he said that an event would have to be held when the park is open between may and sept. The baskets are left up and playable but there are no staff or restrooms available during off months. He also said he would let me run an event unless I formed a club because allowing one individual to do one would be seen as favoritism. I think this is bs since I alone was responsible for them having a course. He also says once I form a club that I would need additional insurance policy to any event. He said this because rc airplace and boat clubs have to have insurance when they use the park.

Long winded I know but has anyone know anything about needing insurance for events or clubs? Also what are your thoughts on the rest of what I wrote?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-21-2014, 08:03 AM
BuzzSharpe BuzzSharpe is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Climax, NC
Years Playing: 44.3
Courses Played: 50
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 128
Firstly, congratulations, Greg on your accomplishment. I know what you're saying about basically being The Lone Ranger. Wish you had done this ten years ago, when I was in Princeton every few weeks running a sales route.
PDGA sanctioned events do require insurance, whether already in place by the P&R, or by purchasing for the duration of the event.
A good players' association can be invaluable in operating events, as there is a bit involved, especially if you're going for PDGA sanctioning. It can also be important in matters of on-going course maintenance. Just be careful not to assemble a bunch of young'uns who will make their primary purpose that of totally taking over and taking credit where credit is not due.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-21-2014, 08:22 AM
bradharris's Avatar
bradharris bradharris is offline
Team Borderland
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Merrimack, NH
Years Playing: 11.5
Courses Played: 75
Posts: 4,376
Regardless of how much work you put in, the parks department still owns the land and the park. Whenever you have an event there, you're acting as an extension of the P&R. Thus, you need to operate within their rules. That means having full facilities available and having some basic insurance coverage. These things are pretty standard.

As for the club requirement, look at it from their perspective. You built the course mostly by yourself. Now you want to start having events by yourself as well. While your intentions are good, it can look to the parks dept like you're using their property for your own personal gain. By involving a club, you're making your event more of a community effort rather than a personal one.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-21-2014, 08:40 AM
JC17393 JC17393 is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Years Playing: 16.8
Courses Played: 119
Throwing Style: LHBH
Posts: 2,334
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzzSharpe View Post
PDGA sanctioned events do require insurance, whether already in place by the P&R, or by purchasing for the duration of the event.
PDGA events don't require insurance, they come with insurance. TD and players are covered by the PDGA's policy just by being members (or temp members) registered for the event. The additional $50 fee for insurance is to add the course powers (parks dept, city/town/state, property owners, etc) on the policy for the duration of the event.

To the OP, club or not, PDGA sanctioning is easily your best bet in terms of having the insurance coverage to satisfy the parks department's needs. Single event policies through an independent insurer could run in the hundreds of dollars where as a PDGA event costs $100 ($50 sanction, $50 insurance) plus player fees included in the entry.

A club is a must if you're dealing with a park course. It shares the workload and ensures that the stewardship of the course is in good hands should you move on for some reason. It's a community course, it should be a community effort to grow interest in it. Doing anything by yourself is just going to burn you out eventually.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-21-2014, 08:44 AM
Timeetyo Timeetyo is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Albion, NY
Years Playing: 0.6
Courses Played: 20
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 648
Another thing to consider. Although it seems like it is a hassle and another hoop to jump through they may be doing you a big favor. Getting a few of the right guys together for the core of the club can mean that you don't have to undertake the next project alone and have others there to help with events. Given the other requirements, you now have until may to get this going.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-21-2014, 09:06 AM
kenjiac's Avatar
kenjiac kenjiac is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Colonie NY
Years Playing: 7.3
Courses Played: 60
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 522
How big is your event? We insurer our sanctioned tournaments but any weekly league or casual gathering (monthlies) we do not get insurance. Sometimes it's better to ask forgiveness instead of permission. If you already asked permission and your having a small event 10-20 players I like to use the analogy to a pick up game of football. Ask them would you require 20 guys playing a pick up game of football in the park to get insurance? If not then why require you to get insurance? Here with our courses in local parks the parks insurance covers DG play just like it would any other park user using the playground or basketball courts or whatever amenities the park has. Good Luck insurance issues can kill a course. We had funding, layout, permission from the parks reps, and then a new town lawyer got involved and his requirements on insurance killed the project.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-21-2014, 09:32 AM
1978 1978 is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Charlotte, Nc
Years Playing: 6.3
Courses Played: 181
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 3,039
Run the event, sanctioned through the PDGA, they cover you with insurance that should be good enough.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-21-2014, 10:06 PM
greg_b_4 greg_b_4 is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Princeton WV
Years Playing: 2.4
Courses Played: 35
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 149
I'm sorry I made it sound like I wanted to do events alone. I do want to form a club but I think it's too late in the year for that, I have plans for that early spring. Once the club is formed I will definitely run events through the club. But I was thinking more of unsanctioned events like an Ice Bowl or an Ace Race. I think I'm gonna see if the manager would be down with just having people sign a waiver for events. No more than 20-30 people just to get interest. The sport is still very new to the area and most people have never heard of it. Also after first pitching the idea to the park and really pushing the free to play idea they did turn around and started charging 2 bucks a round. It isn't bad of course but I'm wondering how a club would work with a pay to play course. I'm thinking of with club membership getting a club bag tag and that tag would let you play for free. I would negotiate a club fee to the park so they still fill like they are getting money. If a non member would want to play in a weekly doubles or something they would just pay the 2 bucks and play with us.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-22-2014, 02:15 AM
scarpfish's Avatar
scarpfish scarpfish is offline
Resident Grouch
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Brownbackistan
Years Playing: 11.3
Courses Played: 317
Posts: 6,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_b_4 View Post
I think I'm gonna see if the manager would be down with just having people sign a waiver for events. No more than 20-30 people just to get interest.
The point of insurance is to protect the parks department from liability, not the participants. Waivers generally need to be written (or at least reviewed) by an attorney to make sure the verbiage holds up to muster, and even in the rosiest scenario they still aren't bulletproof. For one, they don't cover non-participants who don't sign them whose bodies or property end up in the line of fire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_b_4 View Post
The sport is still very new to the area and most people have never heard of it.
In which case, you need the time to form a group which will become the basis for your club. This isn't going to happen overnight. It will take a year minimum. The "event" you should be considering doing is an informal weekly league. From there, you can gauge the interest in doing bigger and more formalized things.
Reply With Quote
 

  #10  
Old 10-22-2014, 07:36 AM
DavidSauls's Avatar
DavidSauls DavidSauls is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Newberry, SC
Years Playing: 19.3
Courses Played: 115
Posts: 7,684
The insurance part makes sense, and the sanctioning advice is the easiest way to obtain it.

The club part, less so. I've played in many, many tournaments in public parts that were run by an individual, not a club. I think they've got it backwards. Once there's a club willing to take some responsibility for the course and asking for exclusive time for events, the park should give them consideration. Until then, why do they care? (If they're opposed to an individual making money, just show them the tournament budget!)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.