#41  
Old 11-15-2012, 10:15 AM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blind pilot View Post
Distance may very well be a better skill in ball golf when everyone is 2 putting,and the course is wide open.

Disc golf is played in confined spaces,that limit your opportunity to throw bombs. Tight spaces call for control not power,now when you're forced to let up you're not throwing as far and not separating from the others,when it comes time to hole out you're 2 putting and the good putters are nailing their first putt.They just gained a stroke on you.

Give me good putting all day every day.With some control. Distance is probably the least needed skill in disc golf. Control and putting trump big d most of the time.
Yeah, but slower discs are easier to control and more forgiving and throwing less than your max D with a disc (say around 80%) will give you a lot more control and accuracy. If you throw farther you can take a lot more advantage of both of those facts on way more shots. Max D is important, just not in the way most people seem to like to claim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by agibson View Post
Yeah, there's got to be some hierarchy of necessary skills for developing players.

The difference between a 500 and a 600 foot drive may not be that significant. But, the difference between a 100 and a 200 foot drive is probably _very_ significant. As might be 200 to 250, 250 to 300 (I'm probably still in between there, myself), maybe 300 to 350.

I know as I've lengthened my drives a little in my year of playing, relatively modest improvements seemed to open up whole new possibilities on the course.

So, maybe it's an ordered list like "putt from 15 feet", "drive to 250", "approach from 100", "putt from 25 feet", etc.
I always like it when a new player has the best observations in a thread like this. Trying to boil it down to one single thing doesn't make anywhere near as much sense as looking at it like that.
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  #42  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:24 PM
AdmiralQuack AdmiralQuack is offline
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For me, most holes that I score worse than I expect to are due to failed putts. Second is hitting trees. So for me putting is the most crucial skill to build, and accuracy is second. I have developed the distance improvement by just playing, with much less effort than the others.
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  #43  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:32 PM
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Monkeypaws Monkeypaws is offline
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I'd say control of one's disc would trump all, meaning you get the disc to do what it wants to do according to your flight plan.

There is nothing more satisfying in my fledgling career than planning a shot, selecting the disc I think will be best for the shot, and having it work.
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  #44  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:41 PM
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Tiny Tiny is offline
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I need to get more aces. It lowers what I have to work on. :P That's the main goal.
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  #45  
Old 11-16-2012, 08:28 PM
Widdershins Widdershins is offline
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It is not even a close call, Putting is what matters most.

Over time darn near anyone can develop accuracy off the tee or from upshots. Practice and experience gives accuracy even with marginal skill.

Driving distance is mostly due to raw athletic talent. For the most part you have power or you don't and very few players develop great power.

Ahhh but putting skill is rare magic. Even vast practice and experience may not solve the putting challenge as it is both the shot with the smallest margin of error and the most difficult mental task.

No one can overcome bad putting. The greatest driver or upshooter in history is not going to park the basket every time. If you miss short putt after short putt there is no possible protection.

Great putters may be born and good putters may be developed but bad putters shoot themselves in the foot in a way they cannot recover from.

We all are most attracted to the skills we have the least of. But remember for a moment those days when you airballed from 10 feet repeatedly. You know you choked. Everybody who saw it knew you chocked. It crushes your spirit.

You can win tournaments without having the best power or the greatest accuracy. You ain't winning nothing if you can't putt.
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  #46  
Old 11-19-2012, 10:11 AM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Widdershins View Post
It is not even a close call, Putting is what matters most.

Over time darn near anyone can develop accuracy off the tee or from upshots. Practice and experience gives accuracy even with marginal skill.

Driving distance is mostly due to raw athletic talent. For the most part you have power or you don't and very few players develop great power.

Ahhh but putting skill is rare magic. Even vast practice and experience may not solve the putting challenge as it is both the shot with the smallest margin of error and the most difficult mental task.

No one can overcome bad putting. The greatest driver or upshooter in history is not going to park the basket every time. If you miss short putt after short putt there is no possible protection.

Great putters may be born and good putters may be developed but bad putters shoot themselves in the foot in a way they cannot recover from.

We all are most attracted to the skills we have the least of. But remember for a moment those days when you airballed from 10 feet repeatedly. You know you choked. Everybody who saw it knew you chocked. It crushes your spirit.

You can win tournaments without having the best power or the greatest accuracy. You ain't winning nothing if you can't putt.
Lots of people claim stuff like this, but how many play as many high level events as _MTL_?

Quote:
Originally Posted by _MTL_ View Post
However I will say that throwing accurately, in my opinion, far outweights good putting.

Some of my best rounds I've ever had I didn't putt well. Hell, I set a course record once and missed 4 putts. I just didn't miss a drive the whole round.

But the stupid insanely good course record rounds I've had, I've thrown well and putted well. The guys in the 1040 range do that. Throw well and putt well.

But I can name countless players who got over the 1000 barrier and couldn't putt worth a lick.
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  #47  
Old 11-19-2012, 11:35 AM
discvoog discvoog is offline
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You can be the best Putter, farthest driver, most accurate thrower but if you don't have a strong metal game and make the shots when they count then none of it matters. So mentality is what matters most. When you get to pro level or play against people with equal skills, the person with the stronger wins 100% of the time.
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  #48  
Old 11-19-2012, 12:25 PM
wake911 wake911 is offline
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You know what. I've been practicing my putting SO much over the last 2 months since i got a basket, and my game has gone to the gutter. I've not been going to fields and throwing, going to courses and working on my mids and drives. Now I've shot the worst rounds ever, despite hitting TONS of putts i never used to hit.

I've learned something in this time. ITS ALL IMPORTANT....i used to blame my bad scores on my poor putting, but now i realize it was just poor balance between drive-mid-putt....(depending on the course) they are all equally important. Some courses might make mids or drives more important due to length, but overall they are all equal.
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  #49  
Old 11-19-2012, 01:25 PM
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Brokensaint Brokensaint is offline
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Accuracy. Accuracy IS making the shot, be it drive approach putt whatever. Placement is the skill that realizes the strategy of the game. Being able to land where you want to is everything. I tend to brainfart putts way more often than I care to admit, so for my personal game putting is the biggest pitfall, but as long as I take my time and get my approach up accurately, I've placed myself in good shape for an easier putt, therefore reducing the risk of said brainfart.
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  #50  
Old 11-19-2012, 01:48 PM
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KenTyburski KenTyburski is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smarkquart View Post
If you play well, the birdies will come. If you start pressing yourself to get birdies all the time or actually try to get a birdie to offset an earlier bogey, you are only going to get yourself in deeper trouble.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonny View Post
My opinion: the most important part of the game is the part inside your head. I see a lot of players who just get in their own way. There's a lot to be gained with a good mental game.
I had the pleasure of playing my first round with Barry Schultz this past weekend. Through five holes, I was actually up on him by one throw. He had taken a bad three-putt on our first hole in unpredictable winds, and made a nice birdie two holes later, but I know his mental game was really struggling to get going. Although he was hitting good lines, his distance was a little off, and he wasn't putting up to his own expectations. My distance was off the whole round, but that's a different story!

So we come up to hole #9 (we had started on #4), and he just catches fire. One solid throw followed by one solid putt, and he goes on to hit nine 2's in a row. About halfway through this run, responding to the quiet compliments from the whole card, he says, "Isn't it something when you just get out of your own way?" After his poor start, he ended up shooting the hot round of the morning.

He knew he had the skill, but what made the difference in his round was entirely mental.

In this same tournament, I would have to say that my accuracy really struggled, and I would consider it the most important element. After the first round, I kept saying that my putting cost me, and that was partially true; I missed several "easy" putts. But reflecting on the round, though, I realize that my distance was off. The reason I was missing putts is because my tee shots and approaches left me with putts that were beyond my range of confidence. During the second round, it was the opposite problem. I putted well, but put three of my throws OB during the round, forcing me to scramble. I carded the same score. During Sunday's final round, I put both together pretty well, and outside of three or four poorly managed holes in the middle of the round, threw way better than on Saturday. Accurate and well-executed middle distance throws, followed by putting, followed by pure distance.
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