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Old 11-16-2012, 12:31 PM
joesouthfla joesouthfla is offline
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sleeves in 5 gallon buckets

We are getting read to install some alternate sleeves and one of our members suggested putting them into 5 gallon buckets instead of pouring the concrete straight into the ground. Has anyone used this method? What are the pros and cons?
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:40 PM
1978 1978 is offline
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Its easy to dig up a 5 gallon bucket worth of concrete since it is all smooth and round on the sides. Pro and Con...

You have to use SO much more concrete to do this...and digging a hole that wide and deep and round...then leveling it is not easy. It is easier to dig a hole... pound in some short rebar and fill with 40 lb of crete. Crete conforms to your hole and you just level the sleeve in that. WAY easier and cheaper and more secure. Ever try digging up a pole that had rebar stuck from its concrete into the surrounding ground like a christmas tree stand? IT IS NOT FUN. It makes the alt location more secure and sturdy than a burried bucket full of concrete would be.
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Old 11-16-2012, 01:30 PM
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Discette Discette is offline
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Joe

From your name, I will assume you are in South Florida.

There are two reasons NOT to use five gallon buckets - only one applies to South Florida.

1- In areas where the ground freezes in winter, the buckets will get pushed up each year through freeze and thaw. Sometime after spring number 3, the bucket should be forced out of the ground enough for someone to take notice that it is a five gallon bucket. By this time, it is fairly easy to pop the target and bucket out of the ground and put into the back of the waiting truck or van.

2 - In areas without freezing. At any time after installation, the target can be dug up with some hard labor and thrown in the back of the waiting truck.
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Old 11-16-2012, 08:48 PM
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tom12003 tom12003 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joesouthfla View Post
We are getting read to install some alternate sleeves and one of our members suggested putting them into 5 gallon buckets instead of pouring the concrete straight into the ground. Has anyone used this method? What are the pros and cons?
Best technique I've seen is to dig the depth needed for the sleeve, balling out the bottom of the hole, adding 3+ 2' pieces of rebar diagonally driven, and adding a valve cover box at the top of the hole (Innova routinely does this and I have also done this; non-used sleeves are at ground level and covered). Makes the sleeve virtually theft resistant as well as being a non-tripper when not in use and not damaged by lawn mowing. The extra $15 is worth it.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:11 PM
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optidiscic optidiscic is online now
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I don't know why people think 5 gallon buckets is a good idea
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:27 PM
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justin justin is offline
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Please don't do this. My local course's Recreation Dept insisted on doing this. Local punks LOVE to rock the baskets back and forth until they fall over.

Also, the way they set the pols all the way to the base of hte buckets means all the basket are a bit low. PLEASE don't do the buckets.

That said, it's great you're expanding your course and it's always great to hear someone's got a new course or more baskets going in. I hope you have a blast getting those in there and playing them once they're done.
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Old 11-16-2012, 10:24 PM
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iacas iacas is offline
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I hadn't thought of doing rebar, but that's a good tip.

Is there a page or site or something with "The Ultimate Guide to Installing a Disc Golf Basket" or something like that? A place that lists all these handy tips and steps, possibly with some photos?
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Old 11-25-2012, 09:09 PM
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Deaf Leopard Deaf Leopard is offline
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If possible get scrap pipe instead of re-bar if you know any construction workers. Electrical tubing isn't at solid as re-bar but if you have seven pipes driven into the dirt fanned out it would be extremely difficult to remove. Just an idea as I bought a piece of re-bar and a few sticks can add up quick$!

Sprinkler pipe would be more than adequate too.
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Old 11-26-2012, 02:39 PM
1978 1978 is offline
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I have a friend that gets me stainless pipe scrap. But! If you have a local rr track take a walk with a bucket up a ways and back again. RR spikes work for a number of projects but I always find other types of metal...10-12" spikes for what I do not know seem to be common and you can pound those in.

Another good place is the local transfer/recycling depot. People bring in truckloads of yard and household trash. usually they have a "metal only" area. There are lots of things made with solid metal poles that peoplet throw away. Ive found bundles of steel tubing, silt fence posts, etc that have used for basket installation, OB, or retaining walls.

I go to the "construction material" area for 2x8,10,12 scraps (for benches) and 2x4' scraps for stairs and retaining walls. come in with an old mattress and leave with a truck full of course material.
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2012, 02:49 PM
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scarpfish scarpfish is offline
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The only time that I've ever seen buckets of concrete used was for alternate bases for tourney temps. For permanent sleeves, I think its a bad idea.
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