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View Poll Results: "Linear/start line aimer" vs. "Non-linear/finish position aimer"? (See first pos
Linear/Start Line Aimer 51 49.51%
Non-Linear/Finish Position Aimer 26 25.24%
It changes / I don't know 26 25.24%
Voters: 103. You may not vote on this poll

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  #21  
Old 11-19-2012, 03:24 PM
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KGroff25 KGroff25 is offline
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*Missed the five minute mark to add this in as an edit.

A good throwing motion keeps the disc on the same line from the apex of the reach back to the release point anyway. So it makes sense to focus on a point on the horizon (or anywhere ahead) and keep the disc on a line from the apex of the reach back to the point on the horizon throughout the whole throwing motion.

I believe that's why the pros always go to the front of the tee box and hold their disc in front of them. They're eyeballing their target in the distance and creating a mental line/plane to keep their disc on from reach back to release point.
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  #22  
Old 11-19-2012, 03:25 PM
Violets caddy Violets caddy is offline
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I definitely let the flight take care of itself.
Focus on the target for a second or two, throw. My body knows how much speed, how much angle, and how much height the disc needs to get to the target better than my brain does. If I think about aiming for a certain tree at a certain height with a certain amount of hyzer the shot is doomed to fail.

See basket, throw disc.
I think all of the conscience thought of flight path are settled with disc selection long before the shot.
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  #23  
Old 11-19-2012, 03:45 PM
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jtreadwell jtreadwell is offline
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OK I get it now and yes, by the definition here I'm more linear. While this is all interesting, how can knowing this be used to improve my game?
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  #24  
Old 11-19-2012, 04:15 PM
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iacas iacas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtreadwell View Post
OK I get it now and yes, by the definition here I'm more linear. While this is all interesting, how can knowing this be used to improve my game?
Well, I'm not far enough along in disc golf to have the answer to that, and I'm not sure the ways I teach people to do this in golf apply, so I won't talk about that.

I have seen people find some relief and some improvement by just knowing what style they are and solidifying it a little bit.

For example, a linear aimer might have a hard time throwing a good tee shot in a wide open field, or to a big downhill hole because there's nothing on the horizon, no "gap" to hit, etc. This guy might want to still pick a cloud, a building or tree in the distance, something to throw at.

A non-linear aimer might have trouble on holes where he can't see the finish area, a blind tee-shot for example or a shot that curves around a stand of trees. This guy might do well to move around so he can see the landing area, then keep that picture in his mind as he visually maps out the flight of the disc.
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  #25  
Old 11-19-2012, 04:26 PM
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notroman notroman is offline
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I also voted for the third option because how I aim varies from shot to shot.

When I make a routine shot/putt it's all finish-position aiming. For instance, any wide open putt inside the circle or throwing a pretty straight forward drive in the woods I just pick where I want my disc to end up and I throw it there. I don't look for any apex or any specific point I have to get through to get there. It's all so automatic and ingrained in muscle memory that any additional thinking gets in the way of the shot.

For more complex shots the aiming is linear. For instance if I have to bend a putt around some tree or through a gap, I aim for a spot the disc has to travel through and the angle it has to be at to get it to the basket. For tighter wooded lines where I'm trying to hit a gap that's pretty far away and I want a disc to be traveling at a certain angle when it's hitting that gap, then it's all linear.

I guess the shots that I have not practiced or thrown enough to be "automatic" require linear aiming for me. Anything that I've covered in field work or that I throw frequently is non-linear.
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  #26  
Old 11-19-2012, 04:28 PM
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sisyphus sisyphus is offline
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Actually kind of an interesting discussion.

I'm linear, after "beginning with the end in mind": if I can see the basket, I'm usually visualizing the path the disc needs to take, and work back to the fact that I need to release on a line with that tree there, so the fade will take the shot in close.

Kind of like bowling: you know how much hook you get, you know your focus point is the second arrow in from the right, then you adjust your starting point in increments as small as a half an inch, in order to fine tune based on that day's oil pattern...
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  #27  
Old 11-19-2012, 05:00 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
A non-linear aimer might have trouble on holes where he can't see the finish area, a blind tee-shot for example or a shot that curves around a stand of trees. This guy might do well to move around so he can see the landing area, then keep that picture in his mind as he visually maps out the flight of the disc.
I guess this supports the fact that I'm not a linear aimer. I shoot rather well (maybe even better) if I can't see the landing area. In fact, my only fairway ace was a blind shot.
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  #28  
Old 11-19-2012, 07:19 PM
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KGroff25 KGroff25 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
For example, a linear aimer might have a hard time throwing a good tee shot in a wide open field, or to a big downhill hole because there's nothing on the horizon, no "gap" to hit, etc. This guy might want to still pick a cloud, a building or tree in the distance, something to throw at.
True story. I moved next to a course that has a lot of short-wide open shots with lots of OB and had a lot of trouble with some fairly easy holes for a while. I had to learn to really pick something out every time and commit to that line rather than aiming at the basket.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtreadwell View Post
OK I get it now and yes, by the definition here I'm more linear. While this is all interesting, how can knowing this be used to improve my game?
It's mostly just a mental thing to build consistency. By knowing which style you are you can focus on that before every shot and make your game really repetitive (in a good way.)

Building a pre-shot routine mentally and physically and doing the same thing every time you step up to the tee box takes some of the thoughts and nerves out of the game. You just step up to the box, physically and mentally go through the same process you do every time, and huk away.

It helps in times when you're throwing over water, OB, etc. in a round that matters. You don't think about whether your going to go OB. You just pick out your spot on the horizon, step up to the box, line yourself up, spin the disc (or whatever else gets you comfortable,) visualize your throw the way that works best for you, and perform knowing the disc is going to do the same thing it did the last thousand times you went through the same routine.

I guess knowing you're going to throw down the line you pick out makes it so you mentally commit to the shot and don't second guess yourself. It's just another way to remove a variable that you could screw up when you're nervous.
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  #29  
Old 11-20-2012, 02:38 AM
AdmiralQuack AdmiralQuack is offline
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I voted linear. I visualise the shot needed to get the results necessary and then concentrate on hitting the gap or line required.
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  #30  
Old 11-20-2012, 02:50 AM
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wake_rider wake_rider is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garublador View Post
I guess this supports the fact that I'm not a linear aimer. I shoot rather well (maybe even better) if I can't see the landing area. In fact, my only fairway ace was a blind shot.
This. I aim for spots as a way to see a line that I'm trying to hit. From there it seems that my shot is much more accurate as to where I want it to end up when I focus more on hitting a line, rather than dropping it near the hole. This is why wide open courses are my enemy. I'm much better at tight, technical stuff that makes you stop and think about your shot, how you're lining it up, and what technique/disc would best fit the flight pattern needed to follow that line. Wide open holes just leave me lost and rushing an ill-aimed, ill visualized shot...
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