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Old 03-20-2015, 04:49 PM
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brichert brichert is online now
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Help with elementary kids

I have a group of (around 20) elementary students to teach disc golf to. Ages range from 6 to 12 and we will meet 1 hour a week for 4 weeks. Each student will have their own putter and I have several portable baskets and a large elementary playground. What activities would you suggest for each session?
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  #2  
Old 03-20-2015, 04:56 PM
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Beto drill.


j/k

"Ring Of Fire", for sure.
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:58 PM
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DougCrawford DougCrawford is offline
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Stretching- maybe a couple simplified versions of sidewinders drills, total of about 15 minutes for that,

For driving practice, 2 lines of 10 people, starting at one side, throw the disc, run to the other side and pick up their disc on the way, second line repeats, go back and forth. Make smaller groups of 5 and 4 lines for more individual attention.

Putt like a relay race- divide them evenly among your baskets- front person putts, grabs disc, and runs to the back.

I haven't taught disc golf to kids in groups before- just my 8 year old- but I am an elementary school teacher, and the best thing you can do is keep them moving and changing things up. Holding the younger ones attention for even 5 minutes can be challenging sometimes.

I would advise heavily against them throwing toward anyone else- like in pro clinics when everyone putts in a circle. There are gonna be some kids who throw hard on purpose and someone it gonna get hurt.
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:44 PM
spinachd spinachd is offline
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I did this for a cub scout troop but we were at a small course.

I went though the different throws and putting. I also showed them a full bag and demonstrated briefly how different discs did different things. Then they each got a Magnet and a few minutes to practice throw.

Then we drew cards and played best shot doubles. This worked great because even the less skilled had a shot get used here and there. Lots of high fives an team atmosphere.

Since you have a playground it's harder but you could make four holes. That way each week culminates with a tournament. in my experience they will like part that the most and look forward to it each week.
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:46 PM
spinachd spinachd is offline
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My kids go to a catholic school with a big fundraising auction every year. I am giving away this same format Disc Golf Tournament for $20. We hope to get 20 players, givem a disc, play dubs and grill.
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Old 03-20-2015, 08:14 PM
jdw91479 jdw91479 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougCrawford View Post

I haven't taught disc golf to kids in groups before- just my 8 year old- but I am an elementary school teacher, and the best thing you can do is keep them moving and changing things up. Holding the younger ones attention for even 5 minutes can be challenging sometimes.

I would advise heavily against them throwing toward anyone else- like in pro clinics when everyone putts in a circle. There are gonna be some kids who throw hard on purpose and someone it gonna get hurt.
I definitely agree with this. Minimize the amount of time they are standing in line and make sure they are moving.

This probably doesn't have to be said, but be positive. No matter how bad of a throw or form a kid has, find something positive to say about what they are doing before you correct them. Also make sure they are complimenting each other. In the school I work in we use a lot of cooperative structures and whenever kids are grouped or paired up they always end with a positive closing gambit. Something as small as making sure they thank their partners and say something that the partner did that they liked.
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Old 03-21-2015, 12:11 AM
Steve West Steve West is online now
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Use hula hoops for tees. They "get" throwing from within the hoop.

Throwing from behind an invisible line connecting two markers, not so much.
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Old 03-21-2015, 07:55 AM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougCrawford View Post
Stretching- maybe a couple simplified versions of sidewinders drills, total of about 15 minutes for that,

For driving practice, 2 lines of 10 people, starting at one side, throw the disc, run to the other side and pick up their disc on the way, second line repeats, go back and forth. Make smaller groups of 5 and 4 lines for more individual attention.

Putt like a relay race- divide them evenly among your baskets- front person putts, grabs disc, and runs to the back.

I haven't taught disc golf to kids in groups before- just my 8 year old- but I am an elementary school teacher, and the best thing you can do is keep them moving and changing things up. Holding the younger ones attention for even 5 minutes can be challenging sometimes.

I would advise heavily against them throwing toward anyone else- like in pro clinics when everyone putts in a circle. There are gonna be some kids who throw hard on purpose and someone it gonna get hurt.
This, and particularly the bold part. I coached youth sports for many years, and having multiple stations and keeping the kids moving and active instead of watching and listening is very important.

If you've got room to start out by throwing a long throw yourself, you'll get their attention.

I once helped with a disc golf intro at a small elementary school. We had the 4th, 5th, & 6th graders, each for an hour. One thing we did was a version of the putting relay, but instead of doing it by time, we kept team scores. (The kids don't need to retrieve discs, if they all have their own putters). The line went around about 3 times. The putts were very short, 15-20'

Driving is tricky because they can be so wild. Some will wind up and throw a disc backwards, or at least, almost backwards. Be careful. Also, watch the boys who, if they're standing around with something throwable, will eventually throw it out of turn.

You've got a vast range of ages there. You'll need different plans for 7-year-olds and 12-year-olds.

Congratulations and good luck.
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:09 AM
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DougCrawford DougCrawford is offline
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Oh something else I thought of- give them assigned spots for their formations for whatever exercises you have them do. It takes more time to set up originally- but will save you loads of transitional time later on. If they know right when they get there they have to go to their spot in the stretch block- or move to their spot in the putting line- and it's the same each time, it will be a much faster change with less chance of "elementary drama"- like- "he pushed me!"- or-"she cut in front of me!"- if it's all assigned that stuff goes away. Alternating boy girl helps cut down on extra chatter a little bit too.

Last edited by DougCrawford; 03-21-2015 at 09:11 AM.
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:53 AM
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Disc Golf Live Disc Golf Live is offline
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Show them the forehand for sure. Small people's hands can manage this much better for longer shots, from what I can tell. Most of the successful little one's I've seen have adopted forehand techniques for most longer shots.
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