#11  
Old 12-11-2012, 05:06 PM
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Austin, the amount that color would affect a disc is less than the chance your disc is a gram or 2 off of the weight you think it is. Dont worry about colors affecting your flight, worry about keeping your grades up so mom will let you keep beating us old guys.

And yes there are 3 threads on this topic
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  #12  
Old 12-11-2012, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
LOL! Look, there is NO WAY something as innocuous as pigment can affect disc stability. It's not the color, it's the run...or lot if you prefer. This should be self evident.
Disagree.

While the other factors you mentioned are more influential, I believe the theory that red and variants of red fly more OS than lets say a blue counterpart with identical weight, dome and plh
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  #13  
Old 12-11-2012, 05:11 PM
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Disagree.

While the other factors you mentioned are more influential, I believe the theory that red and variants of red fly more OS than lets say a blue counterpart with identical weight, dome and plh
While you are correct in theory, the chance someone is so consistant to notice the difference is minimal. It is mostly mental.
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Old 12-11-2012, 05:12 PM
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It is mostly mental.
You're mostly mental.
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Old 12-11-2012, 05:14 PM
steve a steve a is offline
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Blue discs always land in the water when it is an option.
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Old 12-11-2012, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by prerube View Post
While you are correct in theory, the chance someone is so consistant to notice the difference is minimal. It is mostly mental.
Imo, if red and variants of red have iron in them, they would absolutely be more dense. So im not sure how much of a theory it actually is, since its true (not sure if 100% of the colorants used out there have iron in their red so i cant commit to that), if you take something that has iron and something that has no iron, stands to reason one would be heavier or more dense right? Whether or not the average person would notice isnt the point really, its that if its true it would almost certainly have some effect on flight.
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Old 12-11-2012, 05:16 PM
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Nothing flies quite like a flannel patterned groove. Waaaay more consistent than that awful checker patterned grooves....and stability? FORGET about it.
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  #18  
Old 12-11-2012, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Pwingles View Post
Imo, if red and variants of red have iron in them, they would absolutely be more dense. So im not sure how much of a theory it actually is, since its true (not sure if 100% of the colorants used out there have iron in their red so i cant commit to that), if you take something that has iron and something that has no iron, stands to reason one would be heavier or more dense right? Whether or not the average person would notice isnt the point really, its that if its true it would almost certainly have some effect on flight.
If it had iron in it than it would not be pdga legal.
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Old 12-11-2012, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pwingles View Post
Imo, if red and variants of red have iron in them, they would absolutely be more dense. So im not sure how much of a theory it actually is, since its true (not sure if 100% of the colorants used out there have iron in their red so i cant commit to that), if you take something that has iron and something that has no iron, stands to reason one would be heavier or more dense right? Whether or not the average person would notice isnt the point really, its that if its true it would almost certainly have some effect on flight.
A 172 green and a 172 red are both 172. The minute difference in density will be unnoticable to the average thrower. If I dye a white disc red will it become more stable? I dont think so. If a disc is half red and half blue will it wobble?
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  #20  
Old 12-11-2012, 05:18 PM
Wanderer Wanderer is offline
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Seriously, color pigment affecting the disc's stability ain't happening. Almost everything else can though. We all know the usual culprits...
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